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Haloperidol and Ziprasidone for Treatment of Delirium in Critical Illness.
Girard TD, Exline MC, Carson SS, Hough CL, Rock P, Gong MN, Douglas IS, Malhotra A, Owens RL, Feinstein DJ, Khan B, Pisani MA, Hyzy RC, Schmidt GA, Schweickert WD, Hite RD, Bowton DL, Masica AL, Thompson JL, Chandrasekhar R, Pun BT, Strength C, Boehm LM, Jackson JC, Pandharipande PP, Brummel NE, Hughes CG, Patel MB, Stollings JL, Bernard GR, Dittus RS, Ely EW, MIND-USA Investigators
(2018) N Engl J Med 379: 2506-2516
MeSH Terms: Aged, Antipsychotic Agents, Critical Illness, Delirium, Dopamine Antagonists, Double-Blind Method, Female, Haloperidol, Humans, Kaplan-Meier Estimate, Male, Middle Aged, Piperazines, Respiratory Insufficiency, Shock, Thiazoles, Treatment Failure
Show Abstract · Added October 23, 2018
BACKGROUND - There are conflicting data on the effects of antipsychotic medications on delirium in patients in the intensive care unit (ICU).
METHODS - In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we assigned patients with acute respiratory failure or shock and hypoactive or hyperactive delirium to receive intravenous boluses of haloperidol (maximum dose, 20 mg daily), ziprasidone (maximum dose, 40 mg daily), or placebo. The volume and dose of a trial drug or placebo was halved or doubled at 12-hour intervals on the basis of the presence or absence of delirium, as detected with the use of the Confusion Assessment Method for the ICU, and of side effects of the intervention. The primary end point was the number of days alive without delirium or coma during the 14-day intervention period. Secondary end points included 30-day and 90-day survival, time to freedom from mechanical ventilation, and time to ICU and hospital discharge. Safety end points included extrapyramidal symptoms and excessive sedation.
RESULTS - Written informed consent was obtained from 1183 patients or their authorized representatives. Delirium developed in 566 patients (48%), of whom 89% had hypoactive delirium and 11% had hyperactive delirium. Of the 566 patients, 184 were randomly assigned to receive placebo, 192 to receive haloperidol, and 190 to receive ziprasidone. The median duration of exposure to a trial drug or placebo was 4 days (interquartile range, 3 to 7). The median number of days alive without delirium or coma was 8.5 (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.6 to 9.9) in the placebo group, 7.9 (95% CI, 4.4 to 9.6) in the haloperidol group, and 8.7 (95% CI, 5.9 to 10.0) in the ziprasidone group (P=0.26 for overall effect across trial groups). The use of haloperidol or ziprasidone, as compared with placebo, had no significant effect on the primary end point (odds ratios, 0.88 [95% CI, 0.64 to 1.21] and 1.04 [95% CI, 0.73 to 1.48], respectively). There were no significant between-group differences with respect to the secondary end points or the frequency of extrapyramidal symptoms.
CONCLUSIONS - The use of haloperidol or ziprasidone, as compared with placebo, in patients with acute respiratory failure or shock and hypoactive or hyperactive delirium in the ICU did not significantly alter the duration of delirium. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and the VA Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center; MIND-USA ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01211522 .).
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17 MeSH Terms
Evidence against dopamine D1/D2 receptor heteromers.
Frederick AL, Yano H, Trifilieff P, Vishwasrao HD, Biezonski D, Mészáros J, Urizar E, Sibley DR, Kellendonk C, Sonntag KC, Graham DL, Colbran RJ, Stanwood GD, Javitch JA
(2015) Mol Psychiatry 20: 1373-85
MeSH Terms: 2,3,4,5-Tetrahydro-7,8-dihydroxy-1-phenyl-1H-3-benzazepine, Animals, Corpus Striatum, Dopamine Agonists, Dopamine Antagonists, GTP-Binding Protein alpha Subunits, Gq-G11, Grooming, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Luminescent Proteins, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Models, Molecular, Motor Activity, Nucleus Accumbens, Phosphorylation, Protein Multimerization, Protein Structure, Tertiary, Receptors, Dopamine D1, Receptors, Dopamine D2
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
Hetero-oligomers of G-protein-coupled receptors have become the subject of intense investigation, because their purported potential to manifest signaling and pharmacological properties that differ from the component receptors makes them highly attractive for the development of more selective pharmacological treatments. In particular, dopamine D1 and D2 receptors have been proposed to form hetero-oligomers that couple to Gαq proteins, and SKF83959 has been proposed to act as a biased agonist that selectively engages these receptor complexes to activate Gαq and thus phospholipase C. D1/D2 heteromers have been proposed as relevant to the pathophysiology and treatment of depression and schizophrenia. We used in vitro bioluminescence resonance energy transfer, ex vivo analyses of receptor localization and proximity in brain slices, and behavioral assays in mice to characterize signaling from these putative dimers/oligomers. We were unable to detect Gαq or Gα11 protein coupling to homomers or heteromers of D1 or D2 receptors using a variety of biosensors. SKF83959-induced locomotor and grooming behaviors were eliminated in D1 receptor knockout (KO) mice, verifying a key role for D1-like receptor activation. In contrast, SKF83959-induced motor responses were intact in D2 receptor and Gαq KO mice, as well as in knock-in mice expressing a mutant Ala(286)-CaMKIIα that cannot autophosphorylate to become active. Moreover, we found that, in the shell of the nucleus accumbens, even in neurons in which D1 and D2 receptor promoters are both active, the receptor proteins are segregated and do not form complexes. These data are not compatible with SKF83959 signaling through Gαq or through a D1/D2 heteromer and challenge the existence of such a signaling complex in the adult animals that we used for our studies.
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22 MeSH Terms
Relationship between impulsivity, prefrontal anticipatory activation, and striatal dopamine release during rewarded task performance.
Weiland BJ, Heitzeg MM, Zald D, Cummiford C, Love T, Zucker RA, Zubieta JK
(2014) Psychiatry Res 223: 244-52
MeSH Terms: Adult, Anticipation, Psychological, Carbon Radioisotopes, Corpus Striatum, Dopamine, Dopamine Antagonists, Female, Humans, Impulsive Behavior, Income, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Middle Aged, Neostriatum, Nucleus Accumbens, Positron-Emission Tomography, Prefrontal Cortex, Raclopride, Receptors, Dopamine D2, Receptors, Dopamine D3, Reward, Task Performance and Analysis
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2017
Impulsivity, and in particular the negative urgency aspect of this trait, is associated with poor inhibitory control when experiencing negative emotion. Individual differences in aspects of impulsivity have been correlated with striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability and function. This multi-modal pilot study used both positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to evaluate dopaminergic and neural activity, respectively, using modified versions of the monetary incentive delay task. Twelve healthy female subjects underwent both scans and completed the NEO Personality Inventory Revised to assess Impulsiveness (IMP). We examined the relationship between nucleus accumbens (NAcc) dopaminergic incentive/reward release, measured as a change in D2/D3 binding potential between neutral and incentive/reward conditions with [(11)C]raclopride PET, and blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) activation elicited during the anticipation of rewards, measured with fMRI. Left NAcc incentive/reward dopaminergic release correlated with anticipatory reward activation within the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), left angular gyrus, mammillary bodies, and left superior frontal cortex. Activation in the mPFC negatively correlated with IMP and mediated the relationship between IMP and incentive/reward dopaminergic release in left NAcc. The mPFC, with a regulatory role in learning and valuation, may influence dopamine incentive/reward release.
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
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21 MeSH Terms
A thalamocorticostriatal dopamine network for psychostimulant-enhanced human cognitive flexibility.
Samanez-Larkin GR, Buckholtz JW, Cowan RL, Woodward ND, Li R, Ansari MS, Arrington CM, Baldwin RM, Smith CE, Treadway MT, Kessler RM, Zald DH
(2013) Biol Psychiatry 74: 99-105
MeSH Terms: Adaptation, Psychological, Adolescent, Adult, Benzamides, Cerebral Cortex, Cognition, Corpus Striatum, Dextroamphetamine, Dopamine, Dopamine Antagonists, Female, Humans, Male, Nerve Net, Pyrrolidines, Radionuclide Imaging, Thalamus, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added May 27, 2014
BACKGROUND - Everyday life demands continuous flexibility in thought and behavior. We examined whether individual differences in dopamine function are related to variability in the effects of amphetamine on one aspect of flexibility: task switching.
METHODS - Forty healthy human participants performed a task-switching paradigm following placebo and oral amphetamine administration. [(18)F]fallypride was used to measure D2/D3 baseline receptor availability and amphetamine-stimulated dopamine release.
RESULTS - The majority of the participants showed amphetamine-induced benefits through reductions in switch costs. However, such benefits were variable. Individuals with higher baseline thalamic and cortical receptor availability and striatal dopamine release showed greater reductions in switch costs following amphetamine than individuals with lower levels. The relationship between dopamine receptors and stimulant-enhanced flexibility was partially mediated by striatal dopamine release.
CONCLUSIONS - These data indicate that the impact of the psychostimulant on cognitive flexibility is influenced by the status of dopamine within a thalamocorticostriatal network. Beyond demonstrating a link between this dopaminergic network and the enhancement in task switching, these neural measures accounted for unique variance in predicting the psychostimulant-induced cognitive enhancement. These results suggest that there may be measurable aspects of variability in the dopamine system that predispose certain individuals to benefit from and hence use psychostimulants for cognitive enhancement.
Copyright © 2013 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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18 MeSH Terms
Pharmacological evaluation of SN79, a sigma (σ) receptor ligand, against methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity in vivo.
Kaushal N, Seminerio MJ, Robson MJ, McCurdy CR, Matsumoto RR
(2013) Eur Neuropsychopharmacol 23: 960-71
MeSH Terms: Animals, Benzoxazoles, Central Nervous System Stimulants, Corpus Striatum, Dopamine, Dopamine Antagonists, Dopamine Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins, Drug Synergism, Fever, Guanidines, Male, Methamphetamine, Mice, Nerve Tissue Proteins, Neurons, Neuroprotective Agents, Neurotoxicity Syndromes, Piperazines, Random Allocation, Receptors, sigma, Serotonin, Serotonin Antagonists, Serotonin Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins
Show Abstract · Added July 10, 2013
Methamphetamine is a highly addictive psychostimulant drug of abuse, causing hyperthermia and neurotoxicity at high doses. Currently, there is no clinically proven pharmacotherapy to treat these effects of methamphetamine, necessitating identification of potential novel therapeutic targets. Earlier studies showed that methamphetamine binds to sigma (σ) receptors in the brain at physiologically relevant concentrations, where it "acts in part as an agonist." SN79 (6-acetyl-3-(4-(4-(4-florophenyl)piperazin-1-yl)butyl)benzo[d]oxazol-2(3H)-one) was synthesized as a putative σ receptor antagonist with nanomolar affinity and selectivity for σ receptors over 57 other binding sites. SN79 pretreatment afforded protection against methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia and striatal dopaminergic and serotonergic neurotoxicity in male, Swiss Webster mice (measured as depletions in striatal dopamine and serotonin levels, and reductions in striatal dopamine and serotonin transporter expression levels). In contrast, di-o-tolylguanidine (DTG), a well established σ receptor agonist, increased the lethal effects of methamphetamine, although it did not further exacerbate methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia. Together, the data implicate σ receptors in the direct modulation of some effects of methamphetamine such as lethality, while having a modulatory role which can mitigate other methamphetamine-induced effects such as hyperthermia and neurotoxicity.
Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.
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23 MeSH Terms
A flow cytometry-based dopamine transporter binding assay using antagonist-conjugated quantum dots.
Kovtun O, Ross EJ, Tomlinson ID, Rosenthal SJ
(2012) Chem Commun (Camb) 48: 5428-30
MeSH Terms: Binding, Competitive, Biotin, Dopamine, Dopamine Antagonists, Dopamine Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins, Flow Cytometry, Fluorescent Dyes, Gene Expression Regulation, HEK293 Cells, High-Throughput Screening Assays, Humans, Phorbol Esters, Piperazines, Polyethylene Glycols, Quantum Dots, Spectrometry, Fluorescence
Show Abstract · Added May 27, 2014
Here we present the development and validation of a flow cytometry-based dopamine transporter (DAT) binding assay that uses antagonist-conjugated quantum dots (QDs). We anticipate that our QD-based assay is of immediate value to the high throughput screening of novel DAT modulators.
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16 MeSH Terms
Prostaglandin E2-mediated attenuation of mesocortical dopaminergic pathway is critical for susceptibility to repeated social defeat stress in mice.
Tanaka K, Furuyashiki T, Kitaoka S, Senzai Y, Imoto Y, Segi-Nishida E, Deguchi Y, Breyer RM, Breyer MD, Narumiya S
(2012) J Neurosci 32: 4319-29
MeSH Terms: 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylacetic Acid, Analysis of Variance, Animals, Benzazepines, Calcium-Binding Proteins, Corticosterone, Cyclooxygenase 1, Cyclooxygenase 2, Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors, Dinoprostone, Disease Models, Animal, Disease Susceptibility, Dominance-Subordination, Dopamine, Dopamine Antagonists, Homovanillic Acid, Interpersonal Relations, Maze Learning, Membrane Proteins, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Inbred ICR, Mice, Knockout, Microfilament Proteins, Neural Pathways, Oxidopamine, Prefrontal Cortex, Pyrazoles, Receptors, Prostaglandin E, Signal Transduction, Stress, Psychological, Sulfonamides, Time Factors, Tyrosine 3-Monooxygenase, Ventral Tegmental Area
Show Abstract · Added December 21, 2013
Various kinds of stress are thought to precipitate psychiatric disorders, such as major depression. Whereas studies in rodents have suggested a critical role of medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in stress susceptibility, the mechanism of how stress susceptibility is determined through mPFC remains unknown. Here we show a critical role of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), a bioactive lipid derived from arachidonic acid, in repeated social defeat stress in mice. Repeated social defeat increased the PGE(2) level in the subcortical region of the brain, and mice lacking either COX-1, a prostaglandin synthase, or EP1, a PGE receptor, were impaired in induction of social avoidance by repeated social defeat. Given the reported action of EP1 that augments GABAergic inputs to midbrain dopamine neurons, we analyzed dopaminergic response upon social defeat. Analyses of c-Fos expression of VTA dopamine neurons and dopamine turnover in mPFC showed that mesocortical dopaminergic pathway is activated upon social defeat and attenuated with repetition of social defeat in wild-type mice. EP1 deficiency abolished such repeated stress-induced attenuation of mesocortical dopaminergic pathway. Blockade of dopamine D1-like receptor during social defeat restored social avoidance in EP1-deficient mice, suggesting that disinhibited dopaminergic response during social defeat blocks induction of social avoidance. Furthermore, mPFC dopaminergic lesion by local injection of 6-hydroxydopamine, which mimicked the action of EP1 during repeated stress, facilitated induction of social avoidance upon social defeat. Taken together, our data suggest that PGE(2)-EP1 signaling is critical for susceptibility to repeated social defeat stress in mice through attenuation of mesocortical dopaminergic pathway.
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35 MeSH Terms
Attenuation of cocaine's reinforcing and discriminative stimulus effects via muscarinic M1 acetylcholine receptor stimulation.
Thomsen M, Conn PJ, Lindsley C, Wess J, Boon JY, Fulton BS, Fink-Jensen A, Caine SB
(2010) J Pharmacol Exp Ther 332: 959-69
MeSH Terms: Allosteric Regulation, Animals, Central Nervous System Stimulants, Cocaine, Cocaine-Related Disorders, Conditioning, Operant, Discrimination, Psychological, Dopamine Antagonists, Ligands, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Muscarinic Agonists, Receptor, Muscarinic M1, Receptor, Muscarinic M4, Reinforcement, Psychology, Self Administration
Show Abstract · Added February 19, 2015
Muscarinic cholinergic receptors modulate dopaminergic function in brain pathways thought to mediate cocaine's abuse-related effects. Here, we sought to confirm and extend in the mouse species findings that nonselective muscarinic receptor antagonists can enhance cocaine's discriminative stimulus. More importantly, we tested the hypothesis that muscarinic receptor agonists with varied receptor subtype selectivity can blunt cocaine's discriminative stimulus and reinforcing effects; we hypothesized a critical role for the M(1) and/or M(4) receptor subtypes in this modulation. Mice were trained to discriminate cocaine from saline, or to self-administer intravenous cocaine chronically. The nonselective muscarinic antagonists scopolamine and methylscopolamine, the nonselective muscarinic agonists oxotremorine and pilocarpine, the M(1)/M(4)-preferring agonist xanomeline, the putative M(1)-selective agonist (4-hydroxy-2-butynyl)-1-trimethylammonium-3-chlorocarbanilate chloride (McN-A-343), and the novel M(1)-selective agonist 1-(1-2-methylbenzyl)-1,4-bipiperidin-4-yl)-1H benzo[d]imidazol-2(3H)-one (TBPB) were tested as substitution and/or pretreatment to cocaine. Both muscarinic antagonists partially substituted for cocaine and enhanced its discriminative stimulus. Conversely, muscarinic agonists blunted cocaine discrimination and abolished cocaine self-administration with varying effects on food-maintained behavior. Specifically, increasing selectivity for the M(1) subtype (oxotremorine < xanomeline < TBPB) conferred lesser nonspecific rate-suppressing effects, with no rate suppression for TBPB. In mutant mice lacking M(1) and M(4) receptors, xanomeline failed to diminish cocaine discrimination while rate-decreasing effects were intact. Our data suggest that central M(1) receptor activation attenuates cocaine's abuse-related effects, whereas non-M(1)/M(4) receptors probably contribute to undesirable effects of muscarinic stimulation. These data provide the first demonstration of anticocaine effects of systemically applied, M(1) receptor agonists and suggest the possibility of a new approach to pharmacotherapy for cocaine addiction.
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18 MeSH Terms
Operant sensation seeking engages similar neural substrates to operant drug seeking in C57 mice.
Olsen CM, Winder DG
(2009) Neuropsychopharmacology 34: 1685-94
MeSH Terms: Analysis of Variance, Animals, Behavior, Animal, Conditioning, Operant, Dopamine Antagonists, Exploratory Behavior, Extinction, Psychological, Flupenthixol, Food Preferences, Locomotion, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Photic Stimulation, Receptors, Dopamine D1, Reinforcement Schedule, Self Administration, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added May 19, 2014
Novelty and sensation seeking have been associated with elevated drug intake in human and animal studies, suggesting overlap in the circuitry mediating these behaviors. In this study, we found that C57Bl/6J mice readily acquired operant responding for dynamic visual stimuli, a phenomenon we term operant sensation seeking (OSS). Like operant studies using other reinforcers, mice responded on fixed and progressive ratio schedules, were resistant to extinction, and had sustained responding with extended access. We also found that OSS, like psychostimulant self-administration, is sensitive to disruption of dopamine signaling. Low doses of the dopamine antagonist cis-flupenthixol increased active lever responding, an effect reported for psychostimulant self-administration. Additionally, D1-deficient mice failed to acquire OSS, although they readily acquired lever pressing for food. Finally, we found that one common measure of novelty seeking, locomotor activity in a novel open field, did not predict OSS performance. OSS may have predictive validity for screening compounds for use in the treatment of drug addiction. In addition, we also discuss the potential relevance of this animal model to the field of behavioral addictions.
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19 MeSH Terms
Mechanisms underlying methamphetamine-induced dopamine transporter complex formation.
Hadlock GC, Baucum AJ, King JL, Horner KA, Cook GA, Gibb JW, Wilkins DG, Hanson GR, Fleckenstein AE
(2009) J Pharmacol Exp Ther 329: 169-74
MeSH Terms: Animals, Benzazepines, Blotting, Western, Data Interpretation, Statistical, Dopamine, Dopamine Antagonists, Dopamine D2 Receptor Antagonists, Dopamine Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins, Dopamine Uptake Inhibitors, In Vitro Techniques, Male, Methamphetamine, Neostriatum, Nucleus Accumbens, Oxidopamine, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Receptors, Dopamine D1, Receptors, Dopamine D2, Salicylamides, Sympathectomy, Chemical, Synaptosomes
Show Abstract · Added December 7, 2012
Repeated, high-dose methamphetamine (METH) administrations cause persistent dopaminergic deficits in rodents, nonhuman primates, and humans. In rats, this treatment also causes the formation of high-molecular mass (greater than approximately 120 kDa) dopamine transporter (DAT)-associated complexes, the loss of DAT monomer immunoreactivity, and a decrease in DAT function, as assessed in striatal synaptosomes prepared 24 h after METH treatment. The present study extends these findings by demonstrating the regional selectivity of DAT complex formation and monomer loss because these changes in DAT immunoreactivity were not observed in the nucleus accumbens. Furthermore, DAT complex formation was not a consequence limited to METH treatment because it was also caused by intrastriatal administration of 6-hydroxydopamine. Pretreatment with the D2 receptor antagonist, eticlopride [S-(-)-3-chloro-5-ethyl-N-[(1-ethyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)methyl]-6-hydroxy-2-methoxybenzamide hydrochloride], but not the D1 receptor antagonist, SCH23390 [R(+)-7-chloro-8-hydroxy-3-methyl-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine hydrochloride], attenuated METH-induced DAT complex formation. Eticlopride pretreatment also attenuated METH-induced DAT monomer loss and decreases in DAT function; however, the attenuation was much less pronounced than the effect on DAT complex formation. Finally, results also revealed a negative correlation between METH-induced DAT complex formation and DAT activity. Taken together, these data further elucidate the underlying mechanisms and the functional consequences of repeated administrations of METH on the DAT protein. Furthermore, these data suggest a multifaceted role for D2 receptors in mediating METH-induced alterations of the DAT and its function.
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22 MeSH Terms