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IRE1α-XBP1 signaling in leukocytes controls prostaglandin biosynthesis and pain.
Chopra S, Giovanelli P, Alvarado-Vazquez PA, Alonso S, Song M, Sandoval TA, Chae CS, Tan C, Fonseca MM, Gutierrez S, Jimenez L, Subbaramaiah K, Iwawaki T, Kingsley PJ, Marnett LJ, Kossenkov AV, Crespo MS, Dannenberg AJ, Glimcher LH, Romero-Sandoval EA, Cubillos-Ruiz JR
(2019) Science 365:
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cells, Cultured, Cyclooxygenase 2, Dinoprostone, Endoribonucleases, Humans, Leukocytes, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Myeloid Cells, Pain, Postoperative, Promoter Regions, Genetic, Prostaglandin-E Synthases, Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases, Signal Transduction, Unfolded Protein Response, Visceral Pain, X-Box Binding Protein 1
Show Abstract · Added March 12, 2020
Inositol-requiring enzyme 1[α] (IRE1[α])-X-box binding protein spliced (XBP1) signaling maintains endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis while controlling immunometabolic processes. Yet, the physiological consequences of IRE1α-XBP1 activation in leukocytes remain unexplored. We found that induction of prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (/Cox-2) and prostaglandin E synthase (/mPGES-1) was compromised in IRE1α-deficient myeloid cells undergoing ER stress or stimulated through pattern recognition receptors. Inducible biosynthesis of prostaglandins, including the pro-algesic mediator prostaglandin E2 (PGE), was decreased in myeloid cells that lack IRE1α or XBP1 but not other ER stress sensors. Functional XBP1 transactivated the human and genes to enable optimal PGE production. Mice that lack IRE1α-XBP1 in leukocytes, or that were treated with IRE1α inhibitors, demonstrated reduced pain behaviors in PGE-dependent models of pain. Thus, IRE1α-XBP1 is a mediator of prostaglandin biosynthesis and a potential target to control pain.
Copyright © 2019 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.
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18 MeSH Terms
mPGES-1-Mediated Production of PGE and EP4 Receptor Sensing Regulate T Cell Colonic Inflammation.
Maseda D, Banerjee A, Johnson EM, Washington MK, Kim H, Lau KS, Crofford LJ
(2018) Front Immunol 9: 2954
MeSH Terms: Animals, CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes, Colitis, Dinoprostone, Intestinal Mucosa, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Mice, Transgenic, Nuclear Receptor Subfamily 1, Group F, Member 3, Prostaglandin-E Synthases, Receptors, Prostaglandin E, EP2 Subtype, Receptors, Prostaglandin E, EP4 Subtype, T-Lymphocytes, T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory
Show Abstract · Added March 25, 2020
PGE is a lipid mediator of the initiation and resolution phases of inflammation, as well as a regulator of immune system responses to inflammatory events. PGE is produced and sensed by T cells, and autocrine or paracrine PGE can affect T cell phenotype and function. In this study, we use a T cell-dependent model of colitis to evaluate the role of PGE on pathological outcome and T-cell phenotypes. CD4 T effector cells either deficient in mPGES-1 or the PGE receptor EP4 are less colitogenic. Absence of T cell autocrine mPGES1-dependent PGE reduces colitogenicity in association with an increase in CD4RORγt cells in the lamina propria. In contrast, recipient mice deficient in mPGES-1 exhibit more severe colitis that corresponds with a reduced capacity to generate FoxP3 T cells, especially in mesenteric lymph nodes. Thus, our research defines how mPGES-1-driven production of PGE by different cell types in distinct intestinal locations impacts T cell function during colitis. We conclude that PGE has profound effects on T cell phenotype that are dependent on the microenvironment.
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Intestinal host defense outcome is dictated by PGE production during efferocytosis of infected cells.
Dejani NN, Orlando AB, Niño VE, Penteado LA, Verdan FF, Bazzano JMR, Codo AC, Salina ACG, Saraiva AC, Avelar MR, Spolidorio LC, Serezani CH, Medeiros AI
(2018) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 115: E8469-E8478
MeSH Terms: Animals, Citrobacter rodentium, Colitis, Dendritic Cells, Dinoprostone, Enterobacteriaceae Infections, Female, Intestines, Macrophages, Mice, Receptors, Prostaglandin E, EP4 Subtype
Show Abstract · Added March 18, 2020
Inflammatory responses are terminated by the clearance of dead cells, a process termed efferocytosis. A consequence of efferocytosis is the synthesis of the antiinflammatory mediators TGF-β, PGE, and IL-10; however, the efferocytosis of infected cells favors Th17 responses by eliciting the synthesis of TGF-β, IL-6, and IL-23. Recently, we showed that the efferocytosis of apoptotic -infected macrophages by dendritic cells triggers PGE production in addition to pro-Th17 cytokine expression. We therefore examined the role of PGE during Th17 differentiation and intestinal pathology. The efferocytosis of apoptotic -infected cells by dendritic cells promoted high levels of PGE, which impaired IL-1R expression via the EP4-PKA pathway in T cells and consequently inhibited Th17 differentiation. The outcome of murine intestinal infection was dependent on the EP4 receptor. Infected mice treated with EP4 antagonist showed enhanced intestinal defense against compared with infected mice treated with vehicle control. Those results suggest that EP4 signaling during infectious colitis could be targeted as a way to enhance Th17 immunity and host defense.
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Protective Role of mPGES-1 (Microsomal Prostaglandin E Synthase-1)-Derived PGE (Prostaglandin E) and the Endothelial EP4 (Prostaglandin E Receptor) in Vascular Responses to Injury.
Hao H, Hu S, Wan Q, Xu C, Chen H, Zhu L, Xu Z, Meng J, Breyer RM, Li N, Liu DP, FitzGerald GA, Wang M
(2018) Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 38: 1115-1124
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Adhesion, Cell Proliferation, Cells, Cultured, Dinoprostone, Disease Models, Animal, Endothelial Cells, Female, Femoral Artery, Humans, Leukocytes, Male, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Muscle, Smooth, Neointima, Prostaglandin-E Synthases, Re-Epithelialization, Receptors, Epoprostenol, Receptors, Prostaglandin E, EP4 Subtype, Signal Transduction, Vascular System Injuries
Show Abstract · Added May 29, 2018
OBJECTIVE - Deletion of mPGES-1 (microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1)-an anti-inflammatory target alternative to COX (cyclooxygenase)-2-attenuates injury-induced neointima formation in mice. This is attributable to the augmented levels of PGI (prostacyclin)-a known restraint of the vascular response to injury, acting via IP (I prostanoid receptor). To examine the role of mPGES-1-derived PGE (prostaglandin E) in vascular remodeling without the IP.
APPROACH AND RESULTS - Mice deficient in both IP and mPGES-1 (DKO [double knockout] and littermate controls [IP KO (knockout)]) were subjected to angioplasty wire injury. Compared with the deletion of IP alone, coincident deletion of IP and mPGES-1 increased neointima formation, without affecting media area. Early pathological changes include impaired reendothelialization and increased leukocyte invasion in neointima. Endothelial cells (ECs), but not vascular smooth muscle cells, isolated from DKOs exhibited impaired cell proliferation. Activation of EP (E prostanoid receptor) 4 (and EP2, to a lesser extent), but not of EP1 or EP3, promoted EC proliferation. EP4 antagonism inhibited proliferation of mPGES-1-competent ECs, but not of mPGES-1-deficient ECs, which showed suppressed PGE production. EP4 activation inhibited leukocyte adhesion to ECs in vitro, promoted reendothelialization, and limited neointima formation post-injury in the mouse. Endothelium-restricted deletion of EP4 in mice suppressed reendothelialization, increased neointimal leukocytes, and exacerbated neointimal formation.
CONCLUSIONS - Removal of the IP receptors unmasks a protective role of mPGES-1-derived PGE in limiting injury-induced vascular hyperplasia. EP4, in the endothelial compartment, is essential to promote reendothelialization and restrain neointimal formation after injury. Activating EP4 bears therapeutic potential to prevent restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention.
© 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.
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22 MeSH Terms
mPGES1-Dependent Prostaglandin E (PGE) Controls Antigen-Specific Th17 and Th1 Responses by Regulating T Autocrine and Paracrine PGE Production.
Maseda D, Johnson EM, Nyhoff LE, Baron B, Kojima F, Wilhelm AJ, Ward MR, Woodward JG, Brand DD, Crofford LJ
(2018) J Immunol 200: 725-736
MeSH Terms: Animals, Autocrine Communication, Dinoprostone, Epitopes, T-Lymphocyte, Gene Expression Regulation, Immunization, Immunomodulation, Lymphocyte Activation, Mice, Paracrine Communication, Phenotype, Prostaglandin-E Synthases, Receptors, Prostaglandin E, EP2 Subtype, Receptors, Prostaglandin E, EP4 Subtype, Th1 Cells, Th17 Cells
Show Abstract · Added March 25, 2020
The integration of inflammatory signals is paramount in controlling the intensity and duration of immune responses. Eicosanoids, particularly PGE, are critical molecules in the initiation and resolution of inflammation and in the transition from innate to acquired immune responses. Microsomal PGE synthase 1 (mPGES1) is an integral membrane enzyme whose regulated expression controls PGE levels and is highly expressed at sites of inflammation. PGE is also associated with modulation of autoimmunity through altering the IL-23/IL-17 axis and regulatory T cell (Treg) development. During a type II collagen-CFA immunization response, lack of mPGES1 impaired the numbers of CD4 regulatory (Treg) and Th17 cells in the draining lymph nodes. Ag-experienced mPGES1 CD4 cells showed impaired IL-17A, IFN-γ, and IL-6 production when rechallenged ex vivo with their cognate Ag compared with their wild-type counterparts. Additionally, production of PGE by cocultured APCs synergized with that of Ag-experienced CD4 T cells, with mPGES1 competence in the APC compartment enhancing CD4 IL-17A and IFN-γ responses. However, in contrast with CD4 cells that were Ag primed in vivo, exogenous PGE inhibited proliferation and skewed IL-17A to IFN-γ production under Th17 polarization of naive T cells in vitro. We conclude that mPGES1 is necessary in vivo to mount optimal Treg and Th17 responses during an Ag-driven primary immune response. Furthermore, we uncover a coordination of autocrine and paracrine mPGES1-driven PGE production that impacts effector T cell IL-17A and IFN-γ responses.
Copyright © 2018 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.
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Prostaglandin E glyceryl ester is an endogenous agonist of the nucleotide receptor P2Y.
Brüser A, Zimmermann A, Crews BC, Sliwoski G, Meiler J, König GM, Kostenis E, Lede V, Marnett LJ, Schöneberg T
(2017) Sci Rep 7: 2380
MeSH Terms: Animals, Binding Sites, Cell Line, Tumor, Cyclooxygenase 2, Dinoprostone, HEK293 Cells, High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing, High-Throughput Screening Assays, Humans, Kinetics, Ligands, Mice, Molecular Docking Simulation, Protein Binding, Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical, Protein Conformation, beta-Strand, Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs, Purinergic Agonists, RAW 264.7 Cells, Receptors, Purinergic P2, Substrate Specificity, Thermodynamics, Transcriptome
Show Abstract · Added March 17, 2018
Cyclooxygenase-2 catalyses the biosynthesis of prostaglandins from arachidonic acid but also the biosynthesis of prostaglandin glycerol esters (PG-Gs) from 2-arachidonoylglycerol. Previous studies identified PG-Gs as signalling molecules involved in inflammation. Thus, the glyceryl ester of prostaglandin E, PGE-G, mobilizes Ca and activates protein kinase C and ERK, suggesting the involvement of a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). To identify the endogenous receptor for PGE-G, we performed a subtractive screening approach where mRNA from PGE-G response-positive and -negative cell lines was subjected to transcriptome-wide RNA sequencing analysis. We found several GPCRs that are only expressed in the PGE-G responder cell lines. Using a set of functional readouts in heterologous and endogenous expression systems, we identified the UDP receptor P2Y as the specific target of PGE-G. We show that PGE-G and UDP are both agonists at P2Y, but they activate the receptor with extremely different EC values of ~1 pM and ~50 nM, respectively. The identification of the PGE-G/P2Y pair uncovers the signalling mode of PG-Gs as previously under-appreciated products of cyclooxygenase-2.
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23 MeSH Terms
Efferocytosis-induced prostaglandin E2 production impairs alveolar macrophage effector functions during Streptococcus pneumoniae infection.
Salina AC, Souza TP, Serezani CH, Medeiros AI
(2017) Innate Immun 23: 219-227
MeSH Terms: Animals, Apoptosis, Bacteriolysis, Cyclic AMP, Cyclic AMP-Dependent Protein Kinases, Dinoprostone, Female, Homeostasis, Humans, Hydrogen Peroxide, Jurkat Cells, Macrophages, Alveolar, Phagocytosis, Pneumococcal Infections, Rats, Rats, Wistar, Receptors, Prostaglandin E, EP2 Subtype, Receptors, Prostaglandin E, EP4 Subtype, Signal Transduction, Streptococcus pneumoniae
Show Abstract · Added May 4, 2017
Alveolar macrophages (AMs) are multitasking cells that maintain lung homeostasis by clearing apoptotic cells (efferocytosis) and performing antimicrobial effector functions. Different PRRs have been described to be involved in the binding and capture of non-opsonized Streptococcus pneumoniae, such as TLR-2, mannose receptor (MR) and scavenger receptors (SRs). However, the mechanism by which the ingestion of apoptotic cells negatively influences the clearance of non-opsonized S. pneumoniae remains to be determined. In this study, we evaluated whether the prostaglandin E2 (PGE) produced during efferocytosis by AMs inhibits the ingestion and killing of non-opsonized S. pneumoniae. Resident AMs were pre-treated with an E prostanoid (EP) receptor antagonist, inhibitors of cyclooxygenase and protein kinase A (PKA), incubated with apoptotic Jurkat T cells, and then challenged with S. pneumoniae. Efferocytosis slightly decreased the phagocytosis of S. pneumoniae but greatly inhibited bacterial killing by AMs in a manner dependent on PGE production, activation of the EP2-EP4/cAMP/PKA pathway and inhibition of HO production. Our data suggest that the PGE produced by AMs during efferocytosis inhibits HO production and impairs the efficient clearance non-opsonized S. pneumoniae by EP2-EP4/cAMP/PKA pathway.
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20 MeSH Terms
Selective Small Molecule Activators of TREK-2 Channels Stimulate Dorsal Root Ganglion c-Fiber Nociceptor Two-Pore-Domain Potassium Channel Currents and Limit Calcium Influx.
Dadi PK, Vierra NC, Days E, Dickerson MT, Vinson PN, Weaver CD, Jacobson DA
(2017) ACS Chem Neurosci 8: 558-568
MeSH Terms: Action Potentials, Animals, Antibodies, Calcium, Dinoprostone, Electric Stimulation, Fluoxetine, Ganglia, Spinal, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Lectins, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mutation, Nociceptors, Potassium Channel Blockers, Potassium Channels, Tandem Pore Domain, Protein Synthesis Inhibitors, Tetracycline
Show Abstract · Added November 13, 2017
The two-pore-domain potassium (K2P) channel TREK-2 serves to modulate plasma membrane potential in dorsal root ganglia c-fiber nociceptors, which tunes electrical excitability and nociception. Thus, TREK-2 channels are considered a potential therapeutic target for treating pain; however, there are currently no selective pharmacological tools for TREK-2 channels. Here we report the identification of the first TREK-2 selective activators using a high-throughput fluorescence-based thallium (Tl) flux screen (HTS). An initial pilot screen with a bioactive lipid library identified 11-deoxy prostaglandin F2α as a potent activator of TREK-2 channels (EC ≈ 0.294 μM), which was utilized to optimize the TREK-2 Tl flux assay (Z' = 0.752). A HTS was then performed with 76 575 structurally diverse small molecules. Many small molecules that selectively activate TREK-2 were discovered. As these molecules were able to activate single TREK-2 channels in excised membrane patches, they are likely direct TREK-2 activators. Furthermore, TREK-2 activators reduced primary dorsal root ganglion (DRG) c-fiber Ca influx. Interestingly, some of the selective TREK-2 activators such as 11-deoxy prostaglandin F2α were found to inhibit the K2P channel TREK-1. Utilizing chimeric channels containing portions of TREK-1 and TREK-2, the region of the TREK channels that allows for either small molecule activation or inhibition was identified. This region lies within the second pore domain containing extracellular loop and is predicted to play an important role in modulating TREK channel activity. Moreover, the selective TREK-2 activators identified in this HTS provide important tools for assessing human TREK-2 channel function and investigating their therapeutic potential for treating chronic pain.
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19 MeSH Terms
Inhibition of the Biosynthesis of Prostaglandin E2 By Low-Dose Aspirin: Implications for Adenocarcinoma Metastasis.
Boutaud O, Sosa IR, Amin T, Oram D, Adler D, Hwang HS, Crews BC, Milne G, Harris BK, Hoeksema M, Knollmann BC, Lammers PE, Marnett LJ, Massion PP, Oates JA
(2016) Cancer Prev Res (Phila) 9: 855-865
MeSH Terms: Adenocarcinoma, Adult, Aspirin, Cell Line, Tumor, Cyclooxygenase 2, Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors, Dinoprostone, Female, Humans, Male, Neoplasm Invasiveness
Show Abstract · Added January 29, 2018
Meta-analyses have demonstrated that low-dose aspirin reduces the risk of developing adenocarcinoma metastasis, and when colon cancer is detected during aspirin treatment, there is a remarkable 83% reduction in risk of metastasis. As platelets participate in the metastatic process, the antiplatelet action of low-dose aspirin likely contributes to its antimetastatic effect. Cycloxooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-derived prostaglandin E (PGE) also contributes to metastasis, and we addressed the hypothesis that low-dose aspirin also inhibits PGE biosynthesis. We show that low-dose aspirin inhibits systemic PGE biosynthesis by 45% in healthy volunteers (P < 0.0001). Aspirin is found to be more potent in colon adenocarcinoma cells than in the platelet, and in lung adenocarcinoma cells, its inhibition is equivalent to that in the platelet. Inhibition of COX by aspirin in colon cancer cells is in the context of the metastasis of colon cancer primarily to the liver, the organ exposed to the same high concentrations of aspirin as the platelet. We find that the interaction of activated platelets with lung adenocarcinoma cells upregulates COX-2 expression and PGE biosynthesis, and inhibition of platelet COX-1 by aspirin inhibits PGE production by the platelet-tumor cell aggregates. In conclusion, low-dose aspirin has a significant effect on extraplatelet cyclooxygenase and potently inhibits COX-2 in lung and colon adenocarcinoma cells. This supports a hypothesis that the remarkable prevention of metastasis from adenocarcinomas, and particularly from colon adenocarcinomas, by low-dose aspirin results from its effect on platelet COX-1 combined with inhibition of PGE biosynthesis in metastasizing tumor cells. Cancer Prev Res; 9(11); 855-65. ©2016 AACR.
©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.
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11 MeSH Terms
Regulation of arterial reactivity by concurrent signaling through the E-prostanoid receptor 3 and angiotensin receptor 1.
Kraemer MP, Choi H, Reese J, Lamb FS, Breyer RM
(2016) Vascul Pharmacol 84: 47-54
MeSH Terms: Angiotensin II, Animals, Calcium, Dinoprostone, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Femoral Artery, Focal Adhesion Kinase 2, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Receptor, Angiotensin, Type 1, Receptors, Prostaglandin E, EP3 Subtype, Vasoconstriction, rho-Associated Kinases
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2017
Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a cyclooxygenase metabolite that generally acts as a systemic vasodepressor, has been shown to have vasopressor effects under certain physiologic conditions. Previous studies have demonstrated that PGE2 receptor signaling modulates angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced hypertension, but the interaction of these two systems in the regulation of vascular reactivity is incompletely characterized. We hypothesized that Ang II, a principal effector of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, potentiates PGE2-mediated vasoconstriction. Here we demonstrate that pre-treatment of arterial rings with 1nM Ang II potentiated PGE2-evoked constriction in a concentration dependent manner (AUC-Ang II 2.778±2.091, AUC+Ang II 22.830±8.560, ***P<0.001). Using genetic deletion models and pharmacological antagonists, we demonstrate that this potentiation effect is mediated via concurrent signaling between the angiotensin II receptor 1 (AT1) and the PGE2 E-prostanoid receptor 3 (EP3) in the mouse femoral artery. EP3 receptor-mediated vasoconstriction is shown to be dependent on extracellular calcium in combination with proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2) and Rho-kinase. Thus, our findings reveal a novel mechanism through which Ang II and PGE2 regulate peripheral vascular reactivity.
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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15 MeSH Terms