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Invited Commentary on "Optimizing Diffusion-Tensor Imaging Acquisition for Spinal Cord Assessment," with Response from Dr Martín Noguerol et al.
Smith SA
(2020) Radiographics 40: 428-431
MeSH Terms: Diffusion Tensor Imaging, Physical Examination, Spinal Cord
Added March 30, 2020
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1 Members
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3 MeSH Terms
Probing axons using multi-compartmental diffusion in multiple sclerosis.
Bagnato F, Franco G, Li H, Kaden E, Ye F, Fan R, Chen A, Alexander DC, Smith SA, Dortch R, Xu J
(2019) Ann Clin Transl Neurol 6: 1595-1605
MeSH Terms: Adult, Axons, Brain, Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Multiple Sclerosis, White Matter
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2020
OBJECTS - The diffusion-based spherical mean technique (SMT) provides a novel model to relate multi-b-value diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data to features of tissue microstructure. We propose the first clinical application of SMT to image the brain of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and investigate clinical feasibility and translation.
METHODS - Eighteen MS patients and nine age- and sex-matched healthy controls (HCs) underwent a 3.0 Tesla scan inclusive of clinical sequences and SMT images (isotropic resolution of 2 mm). Axial diffusivity (AD), apparent axonal volume fraction (V ), and effective neural diffusivity (D ) parametric maps were fitted. Differences in AD, V , and D between anatomically matched regions reflecting different tissues types were estimated using generalized linear mixed models for binary outcomes.
RESULTS - Differences were seen in all SMT-derived parameters between chronic black holes (cBHs) and T2-lesions (P ≤ 0.0016), in V and AD between T2-lesions and normal appearing white matter (NAWM) (P < 0.0001), but not between the NAWM and normal WM in HCs. Inverse correlations were seen between V and AD in cBHs (r = -0.750, P = 0.02); in T2-lesions D values were associated with V (r = 0.824, P < 0.0001) and AD (r = 0.570, P = 0.014).
INTERPRETATIONS - SMT-derived metrics are sensitive to pathological changes and hold potential for clinical application in MS patients.
© 2019 The Authors. Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc on behalf of American Neurological Association.
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2 Members
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10 MeSH Terms
Diffusion MRI microstructural models in the cervical spinal cord - Application, normative values, and correlations with histological analysis.
Schilling KG, By S, Feiler HR, Box BA, O'Grady KP, Witt A, Landman BA, Smith SA
(2019) Neuroimage 201: 116026
MeSH Terms: Adult, Cervical Cord, Correlation of Data, Diffusion Tensor Imaging, Humans, Models, Anatomic
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2020
Multi-compartment tissue modeling using diffusion magnetic resonance imaging has proven valuable in the brain, offering novel indices sensitive to the tissue microstructural environment in vivo on clinical MRI scanners. However, application, characterization, and validation of these models in the spinal cord remain relatively under-studied. In this study, we apply a diffusion "signal" model (diffusion tensor imaging, DTI) and two commonly implemented "microstructural" models (neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging, NODDI; spherical mean technique, SMT) in the human cervical spinal cord of twenty-one healthy controls. We first provide normative values of DTI, SMT, and NODDI indices in a number of white matter ascending and descending pathways, as well as various gray matter regions. We then aim to validate the sensitivity and specificity of these diffusion-derived contrasts by relating these measures to indices of the tissue microenvironment provided by a histological template. We find that DTI indices are sensitive to a number of microstructural features, but lack specificity. The microstructural models also show sensitivity to a number of microstructure features; however, they do not capture the specific microstructural features explicitly modelled. Although often regarded as a simple extension of the brain in the central nervous system, it may be necessary to re-envision, or specifically adapt, diffusion microstructural models for application to the human spinal cord with clinically feasible acquisitions - specifically, adjusting, adapting, and re-validating the modeling as it relates to both theory (i.e. relevant biology, assumptions, and signal regimes) and parameter estimation (for example challenges of acquisition, artifacts, and processing).
Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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6 MeSH Terms
Quantification of DTI in the Pediatric Spinal Cord: Application to Clinical Evaluation in a Healthy Patient Population.
Reynolds BB, By S, Weinberg QR, Witt AA, Newton AT, Feiler HR, Ramkorun B, Clayton DB, Couture P, Martus JE, Adams M, Wellons JC, Smith SA, Bhatia A
(2019) AJNR Am J Neuroradiol 40: 1236-1241
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Algorithms, Anisotropy, Child, Child, Preschool, Diffusion Tensor Imaging, Female, Humans, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Infant, Male, Neurogenesis, Neuroimaging, Retrospective Studies, Spinal Cord
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2020
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE - The purpose of the study is to characterize diffusion tensor imaging indices in the developing spinal cord, evaluating differences based on age and cord region. Describing the progression of DTI indices in the pediatric cord increases our understanding of spinal cord development.
MATERIALS AND METHODS - A retrospective analysis was performed on DTI acquired in 121 pediatric patients (mean, 8.6 years; range, 0.3-18.0 years) at Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt from 2017 to 2018. Diffusion-weighted images (15 directions; = 750 s/mm; slice thickness, 5 mm; in-plane resolution, 1.0 × 1.0 mm) were acquired on a 3T scanner in the cervicothoracic and/or thoracolumbar cord. Manual whole-cord segmentation was performed. Images were masked and further segmented into cervical, upper thoracic, thoracolumbar, and conus regions. Analyses of covariance were performed for each DTI-derived index to investigate how age affects diffusion across cord regions, and 95% confidence intervals were calculated across age for each derived index and region. Post hoc testing was performed to analyze regional differences.
RESULTS - Analyses of covariance revealed significant correlations of age with axial diffusivity, mean diffusivity, and fractional anisotropy (all, < .001). There were also significant differences among cord regions for axial diffusivity, radial diffusivity, mean diffusivity, and fractional anisotropy (all, < .001).
CONCLUSIONS - This research demonstrates that diffusion evolves in the pediatric spinal cord during development, dependent on both cord region and the diffusion index of interest. Future research could investigate how diffusion may be affected by common pediatric spinal pathologies.
© 2019 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.
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15 MeSH Terms
Improved gray matter surface based spatial statistics in neuroimaging studies.
Parvathaneni P, Lyu I, Huo Y, Rogers BP, Schilling KG, Nath V, Blaber JA, Hainline AE, Anderson AW, Woodward ND, Landman BA
(2019) Magn Reson Imaging 61: 285-295
MeSH Terms: Adult, Algorithms, Artifacts, Brain, Computer Simulation, Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Diffusion Tensor Imaging, Female, Gray Matter, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Memory, Short-Term, Neurites, Neuroimaging, Probability, White Matter
Show Abstract · Added January 31, 2020
Neuroimaging often involves acquiring high-resolution anatomical images along with other low-resolution image modalities, like diffusion and functional magnetic resonance imaging. Performing gray matter statistics with low-resolution image modalities is a challenge due to registration artifacts and partial volume effects. Gray matter surface based spatial statistics (GS-BSS) has been shown to provide higher sensitivity using gray matter surfaces compared to that of skeletonization approach of gray matter based spatial statistics which is adapted from tract based spatial statistics in diffusion studies. In this study, we improve upon GS-BSS incorporating neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging (NODDI) based search (denoted N-GSBSS) by 1) enhancing metrics mapping from native space, 2) incorporating maximum orientation dispersion index (ODI) search along surface normal, and 3) proposing applicability to other modalities, such as functional MRI (fMRI). We evaluated the performance of N-GSBSS against three baseline pipelines: volume-based registration, FreeSurfer's surface registration and ciftify pipeline for fMRI and simulation studies. First, qualitative mean ODI results are shown for N-GSBSS with and without NODDI based search in comparison with ciftify pipeline. Second, we conducted one-sample t-tests on working memory activations in fMRI to show that the proposed method can aid in the analysis of low resolution fMRI data. Finally we performed a sensitivity test in a simulation study by varying percentage change of intensity values within a region of interest in gray matter probability maps. N-GSBSS showed higher sensitivity in the simulation test compared to the other methods capturing difference between the groups starting at 10% change in the intensity values. The computational time of N-GSBSS is 68 times faster than that of traditional surface-based or 86 times faster than that of ciftify pipeline analysis.
Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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MeSH Terms
Synthesized b0 for diffusion distortion correction (Synb0-DisCo).
Schilling KG, Blaber J, Huo Y, Newton A, Hansen C, Nath V, Shafer AT, Williams O, Resnick SM, Rogers B, Anderson AW, Landman BA
(2019) Magn Reson Imaging 64: 62-70
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Algorithms, Artifacts, Brain, Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Echo-Planar Imaging, Humans, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Middle Aged
Show Abstract · Added March 18, 2020
Diffusion magnetic resonance images typically suffer from spatial distortions due to susceptibility induced off-resonance fields, which may affect the geometric fidelity of the reconstructed volume and cause mismatches with anatomical images. State-of-the art susceptibility correction (for example, FSL's TOPUP algorithm) typically requires data acquired twice with reverse phase encoding directions, referred to as blip-up blip-down acquisitions, in order to estimate an undistorted volume. Unfortunately, not all imaging protocols include a blip-up blip-down acquisition, and cannot take advantage of the state-of-the art susceptibility and motion correction capabilities. In this study, we aim to enable TOPUP-like processing with historical and/or limited diffusion imaging data that include only a structural image and single blip diffusion image. We utilize deep learning to synthesize an undistorted non-diffusion weighted image from the structural image, and use the non-distorted synthetic image as an anatomical target for distortion correction. We evaluate the efficacy of this approach (named Synb0-DisCo) and show that our distortion correction process results in better matching of the geometry of undistorted anatomical images, reduces variation in diffusion modeling, and is practically equivalent to having both blip-up and blip-down non-diffusion weighted images.
Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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1 Members
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11 MeSH Terms
Histologically derived fiber response functions for diffusion MRI vary across white matter fibers-An ex vivo validation study in the squirrel monkey brain.
Schilling KG, Gao Y, Stepniewska I, Janve V, Landman BA, Anderson AW
(2019) NMR Biomed 32: e4090
MeSH Terms: Algorithms, Animals, Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Diffusion Tensor Imaging, Saimiri, White Matter
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Understanding the relationship between the diffusion-weighted MRI signal and the arrangement of white matter fibers is fundamental for accurate voxel-wise reconstruction of the fiber orientation distribution (FOD) and subsequent fiber tractography. Spherical deconvolution reconstruction techniques model the diffusion signal as the convolution of the FOD with a response function that represents the signal profile of a single fiber orientation. Thus, given the signal and a fiber response function, the FOD can be estimated in every imaging voxel by deconvolution. However, the selection of the appropriate response function remains relatively under-studied, and requires further validation. In this work, using 3D histologically defined FODs and the corresponding diffusion signal from three ex vivo squirrel monkey brains, we derive the ground truth response functions. We find that the histologically derived response functions differ from those conventionally used. Next, we find that response functions statistically vary across brain regions, which suggests that the practice of using the same kernel throughout the brain is not optimal. We show that different kernels lead to different FOD reconstructions, which in turn can lead to different tractography results depending on algorithmic parameters, with large variations in the accuracy of resulting reconstructions. Together, these results suggest there is room for improvement in estimating and understanding the relationship between the diffusion signal and the underlying FOD.
© 2019 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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1 Members
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6 MeSH Terms
Cardio-oncology: a novel platform for basic and translational cardiovascular investigation driven by clinical need.
Moslehi J, Fujiwara K, Guzik T
(2019) Cardiovasc Res 115: 819-823
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antineoplastic Agents, Cardiology, Cardiotoxicity, Cardiovascular Diseases, Diffusion of Innovation, Forecasting, Humans, Medical Oncology, Risk Factors, Translational Medical Research
Added November 12, 2019
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1 Members
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11 MeSH Terms
White matter microstructure correlates of general and specific second-order factors of psychopathology.
Hinton KE, Lahey BB, Villalta-Gil V, Meyer FAC, Burgess LL, Chodes LK, Applegate B, Van Hulle CA, Landman BA, Zald DH
(2019) Neuroimage Clin 22: 101705
MeSH Terms: Adult, Antisocial Personality Disorder, Brain, Diffusion Tensor Imaging, Female, Humans, Male, White Matter, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added April 15, 2019
Increasing data indicate that prevalent forms of psychopathology can be organized into second-order dimensions based on their correlations, including a general factor of psychopathology that explains the common variance among all disorders and specific second-order externalizing and internalizing factors. Nevertheless, most existing studies on the neural correlates of psychopathology employ case-control designs that treat diagnoses as independent categories, ignoring the highly correlated nature of psychopathology. Thus, for instance, although perturbations in white matter microstructure have been identified across a range of mental disorders, nearly all such studies used case-control designs, leaving it unclear whether observed relations reflect disorder-specific characteristics or transdiagnostic associations. Using a representative sample of 410 young adult twins oversampled for psychopathology risk, we tested the hypothesis that some previously observed relations between white matter microstructure properties in major tracts and specific disorders are related to second-order factors of psychopathology. We examined fractional anisotropy (FA), radial diffusivity (RD), and axial diffusivity (AD). White matter correlates of all second-order factors were identified after controlling for multiple statistical tests, including the general factor (FA in the body of the corpus callosum), specific internalizing (AD in the fornix), and specific externalizing (AD in the splenium of the corpus callosum, sagittal stratum, anterior corona radiata, and internal capsule). These findings suggest that some features of white matter within specific tracts may be transdiagnostically associated multiple forms of psychopathology through second-order factors of psychopathology rather with than individual mental disorders.
Copyright © 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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9 MeSH Terms
Diffusion tensor tractography to visualize axonal outgrowth and regeneration in a 4-cm reverse autograft sciatic nerve rabbit injury model.
Farinas AF, Pollins AC, Stephanides M, O'Neill D, Al-Kassis S, Esteve IVM, Colazo JM, Keller PR, Rankin T, Wormer BA, Kaoutzanis C, Dortch RD, Thayer WP
(2019) Neurol Res 41: 257-264
MeSH Terms: Animals, Axons, Diffusion Tensor Imaging, Imaging, Three-Dimensional, Nerve Regeneration, Peripheral Nerve Injuries, Rabbits, Sciatic Nerve, Transplantation, Autologous
Show Abstract · Added November 7, 2019
BACKGROUND - Diffusion tensor tractography (DTT) has recently been shown to accurately detect nerve injury and regeneration. This study assesses whether 7-tesla (7T) DTT imaging is a viable modality to observe axonal outgrowth in a 4 cm rabbit sciatic nerve injury model fixed by a reverse autograft (RA) surgical technique.
METHODS - Transection injury of unilateral sciatic nerve (4 cm long) was performed in 25 rabbits and repaired using a RA surgical technique. Analysis of the nerve autograft was performed at 3, 6, and 11 weeks postoperatively and compared to normal contralateral sciatic nerve, used as control group. High-resolution DTT from ex vivo sciatic nerves were obtained using 3D diffusion-weighted spin-echo acquisitions at 7-T. Total axons and motor and sensory axons were counted at defined lengths along the graft.
RESULTS - At 11 weeks, histologically, the total axon count of the RA group was equivalent to the contralateral uninjured nerve control group. Similarly, by qualitative DTT visualization, the 11-week RA group showed increased fiber tracts compared to the 3 and 6 weeks counterparts. Upon immunohistochemical evaluation, 11-week motor axon counts did not significantly differ between RA and control; but significantly decreased sensory axon counts remained. Nerves explanted at 3 weeks and 6 weeks showed decreased motor and sensory axon counts.
DISCUSSION - 7-T DTT is an effective imaging modality that may be used qualitatively to visualize axonal outgrowth and regeneration. This has implications for the development of technology that non-invasively monitors peripheral nerve regeneration in a variety of clinical settings.
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