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High-Fat, High-Sugar Diet-Induced Subendothelial Matrix Stiffening is Mitigated by Exercise.
Kohn JC, Azar J, Seta F, Reinhart-King CA
(2018) Cardiovasc Eng Technol 9: 84-93
MeSH Terms: Animals, Aorta, Abdominal, Arterial Pressure, Diet, Healthy, Diet, High-Fat, Dietary Sugars, Disease Models, Animal, Elastic Modulus, Exercise Therapy, Extracellular Matrix, Male, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Microscopy, Atomic Force, Peripheral Arterial Disease, Pulse Wave Analysis, Risk Reduction Behavior, Time Factors, Vascular Stiffness
Show Abstract · Added December 7, 2017
Consumption of a high-fat, high-sugar diet and sedentary lifestyle are correlated with bulk arterial stiffening. While measurements of bulk arterial stiffening are used to assess cardiovascular health clinically, they cannot account for changes to the tissue occurring on the cellular scale. The compliance of the subendothelial matrix in the intima mediates vascular permeability, an initiating step in atherosclerosis. High-fat, high-sugar diet consumption and a sedentary lifestyle both cause micro-scale subendothelial matrix stiffening, but the impact of these factors in concert remains unknown. In this study, mice on a high-fat, high-sugar diet were treated with aerobic exercise or returned to a normal diet. We measured bulk arterial stiffness through pulse wave velocity and subendothelial matrix stiffness ex vivo through atomic force microscopy. Our data indicate that while diet reversal mitigates high-fat, high-sugar diet-induced macro- and micro-scale stiffening, exercise only significantly decreases micro-scale stiffness and not macro-scale stiffness, during the time-scale studied. These data underscore the need for both healthy diet and exercise to maintain vascular health. These data also indicate that exercise may serve as a key lifestyle modification to partially reverse the deleterious impacts of high-fat, high-sugar diet consumption, even while macro-scale stiffness indicators do not change.
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18 MeSH Terms
Genetic variation in SLC7A2 interacts with calcium and magnesium intakes in modulating the risk of colorectal polyps.
Sun P, Zhu X, Shrubsole MJ, Ness RM, Hibler EA, Cai Q, Long J, Chen Z, Li G, Hou L, Smalley WE, Edwards TL, Giovannucci E, Zheng W, Dai Q
(2017) J Nutr Biochem 47: 35-40
MeSH Terms: Adenoma, Amino Acid Transport Systems, Basic, Calcium, Dietary, Case-Control Studies, Colonic Polyps, Colonoscopy, Colorectal Neoplasms, Diet, Healthy, Dietary Supplements, Female, Genetic Association Studies, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Humans, Magnesium, Male, Middle Aged, Neoplasm Grading, Patient Compliance, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Self Report, Tennessee, Tumor Burden
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2018
Solute carrier family 7, member 2 (SLC7A2) gene encodes a protein called cationic amino acid transporter 2, which mediates the transport of arginine, lysine and ornithine. l-Arginine is necessary for cancer development and progression, including an important role in colorectal cancer pathogenesis. Furthermore, previous studies found that both calcium and magnesium inhibit the transport of arginine. Thus, calcium, magnesium or calcium:magnesium intake ratio may interact with polymorphisms in the SLC7A2 gene in association with colorectal cancer. We conducted a two-phase case-control study within the Tennessee Colorectal Polyps Study. In the first phase, 23 tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the SLC7A2 gene were included for 725 colorectal adenoma cases and 755 controls. In the second phase conducted in an independent set of 607 cases and 2113 controls, we replicated the significant findings in the first phase. We observed that rs2720574 significantly interacted with calcium:magnesium intake ratio in association with odds of adenoma, particularly multiple/advanced adenoma. In the combined analysis, among those with a calcium:magnesium intake ratio below 2.78, individuals who carried GC/CC genotypes demonstrated higher odds of adenoma [OR (95% CI):1.36 (1.11-1.68)] and multiple/advanced adenoma [OR (95% CI): 1.68 (1.28, 2.20)] than those who carried the GG genotype. The P values for interactions between calcium:magnesium intake ratio and rs2720574 were .002 for all adenomas and <.001 for multiple/advanced adenoma. Among those with the GG genotype, a high calcium:magnesium ratio was associated with increased odds of colorectal adenoma [OR (95% CI): 1.73 (1.27-2.36)] and advanced/multiple adenomas [1.62 (1.05-2.50)], whereas among those with the GC/CC genotypes, high calcium:magnesium ratio was related to reduced odds of colorectal adenoma [0.64 (0.42-0.99)] and advanced/multiple adenomas [0.55 (0.31-1.00)].
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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2 Members
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22 MeSH Terms