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Vascular depression consensus report - a critical update.
Aizenstein HJ, Baskys A, Boldrini M, Butters MA, Diniz BS, Jaiswal MK, Jellinger KA, Kruglov LS, Meshandin IA, Mijajlovic MD, Niklewski G, Pospos S, Raju K, Richter K, Steffens DC, Taylor WD, Tene O
(2016) BMC Med 14: 161
MeSH Terms: Aged, Brain, Cerebrovascular Disorders, Consensus, Depressive Disorder, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2017
BACKGROUND - Vascular depression is regarded as a subtype of late-life depression characterized by a distinct clinical presentation and an association with cerebrovascular damage. Although the term is commonly used in research settings, widely accepted diagnostic criteria are lacking and vascular depression is absent from formal psychiatric manuals such as the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5 edition - a fact that limits its use in clinical settings. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, showing a variety of cerebrovascular lesions, including extensive white matter hyperintensities, subcortical microvascular lesions, lacunes, and microinfarcts, in patients with late life depression, led to the introduction of the term "MRI-defined vascular depression".
DISCUSSION - This diagnosis, based on clinical and MRI findings, suggests that vascular lesions lead to depression by disruption of frontal-subcortical-limbic networks involved in mood regulation. However, despite multiple MRI approaches to shed light on the spatiotemporal structural changes associated with late life depression, the causal relationship between brain changes, related lesions, and late life depression remains controversial. While postmortem studies of elderly persons who died from suicide revealed lacunes, small vessel, and Alzheimer-related pathologies, recent autopsy data challenged the role of these lesions in the pathogenesis of vascular depression. Current data propose that the vascular depression connotation should be reserved for depressed older patients with vascular pathology and evident cerebral involvement. Based on current knowledge, the correlations between intra vitam neuroimaging findings and their postmortem validity as well as the role of peripheral markers of vascular disease in late life depression are discussed.
CONCLUSION - The multifold pathogenesis of vascular depression as a possible subtype of late life depression needs further elucidation. There is a need for correlative clinical, intra vitam structural and functional MRI as well as postmortem MRI and neuropathological studies in order to confirm the relationship between clinical symptomatology and changes in specific brain regions related to depression. To elucidate the causal relationship between regional vascular brain changes and vascular depression, animal models could be helpful. Current treatment options include a combination of vasoactive drugs and antidepressants, but the outcomes are still unsatisfying.
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9 MeSH Terms
Copy number variation in obsessive-compulsive disorder and tourette syndrome: a cross-disorder study.
McGrath LM, Yu D, Marshall C, Davis LK, Thiruvahindrapuram B, Li B, Cappi C, Gerber G, Wolf A, Schroeder FA, Osiecki L, O'Dushlaine C, Kirby A, Illmann C, Haddad S, Gallagher P, Fagerness JA, Barr CL, Bellodi L, Benarroch F, Bienvenu OJ, Black DW, Bloch MH, Bruun RD, Budman CL, Camarena B, Cath DC, Cavallini MC, Chouinard S, Coric V, Cullen B, Delorme R, Denys D, Derks EM, Dion Y, Rosário MC, Eapen V, Evans P, Falkai P, Fernandez TV, Garrido H, Geller D, Grabe HJ, Grados MA, Greenberg BD, Gross-Tsur V, Grünblatt E, Heiman GA, Hemmings SM, Herrera LD, Hounie AG, Jankovic J, Kennedy JL, King RA, Kurlan R, Lanzagorta N, Leboyer M, Leckman JF, Lennertz L, Lochner C, Lowe TL, Lyon GJ, Macciardi F, Maier W, McCracken JT, McMahon W, Murphy DL, Naarden AL, Neale BM, Nurmi E, Pakstis AJ, Pato MT, Pato CN, Piacentini J, Pittenger C, Pollak Y, Reus VI, Richter MA, Riddle M, Robertson MM, Rosenberg D, Rouleau GA, Ruhrmann S, Sampaio AS, Samuels J, Sandor P, Sheppard B, Singer HS, Smit JH, Stein DJ, Tischfield JA, Vallada H, Veenstra-VanderWeele J, Walitza S, Wang Y, Wendland JR, Shugart YY, Miguel EC, Nicolini H, Oostra BA, Moessner R, Wagner M, Ruiz-Linares A, Heutink P, Nestadt G, Freimer N, Petryshen T, Posthuma D, Jenike MA, Cox NJ, Hanna GL, Brentani H, Scherer SW, Arnold PD, Stewart SE, Mathews CA, Knowles JA, Cook EH, Pauls DL, Wang K, Scharf JM
(2014) J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 53: 910-9
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, DNA Copy Number Variations, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Female, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genome-Wide Association Study, Humans, Male, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Tourette Syndrome
Show Abstract · Added February 22, 2016
OBJECTIVE - Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and Tourette syndrome (TS) are heritable neurodevelopmental disorders with a partially shared genetic etiology. This study represents the first genome-wide investigation of large (>500 kb), rare (<1%) copy number variants (CNVs) in OCD and the largest genome-wide CNV analysis in TS to date.
METHOD - The primary analyses used a cross-disorder design for 2,699 case patients (1,613 ascertained for OCD, 1,086 ascertained for TS) and 1,789 controls. Parental data facilitated a de novo analysis in 348 OCD trios.
RESULTS - Although no global CNV burden was detected in the cross-disorder analysis or in secondary, disease-specific analyses, there was a 3.3-fold increased burden of large deletions previously associated with other neurodevelopmental disorders (p = .09). Half of these neurodevelopmental deletions were located in a single locus, 16p13.11 (5 case patient deletions: 0 control deletions, p = .08 in the current study, p = .025 compared to published controls). Three 16p13.11 deletions were confirmed de novo, providing further support for the etiological significance of this region. The overall OCD de novo rate was 1.4%, which is intermediate between published rates in controls (0.7%) and in individuals with autism or schizophrenia (2-4%).
CONCLUSION - Several converging lines of evidence implicate 16p13.11 deletions in OCD, with weaker evidence for a role in TS. The trend toward increased overall neurodevelopmental CNV burden in TS and OCD suggests that deletions previously associated with other neurodevelopmental disorders may also contribute to these phenotypes.
Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. All rights reserved.
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11 MeSH Terms
Catatonia in DSM-5.
Tandon R, Heckers S, Bustillo J, Barch DM, Gaebel W, Gur RE, Malaspina D, Owen MJ, Schultz S, Tsuang M, van Os J, Carpenter W
(2013) Schizophr Res 150: 26-30
MeSH Terms: Catatonia, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Humans
Show Abstract · Added February 12, 2015
Although catatonia has historically been associated with schizophrenia and is listed as a subtype of the disorder, it can occur in patients with a primary mood disorder and in association with neurological diseases and other general medical conditions. Consequently, catatonia secondary to a general medical condition was included as a new condition and catatonia was added as an episode specifier of major mood disorders in DSM-IV. Different sets of criteria are utilized to diagnose catatonia in schizophrenia and primary mood disorders versus neurological/medical conditions in DSM-IV, however, and catatonia is a codable subtype of schizophrenia but a specifier for major mood disorders without coding. In part because of this discrepant treatment across the DSM-IV manual, catatonia is frequently not recognized by clinicians. Additionally, catatonia is known to occur in several conditions other than schizophrenia, major mood disorders, or secondary to a general medical condition. Four changes are therefore made in the treatment of catatonia in DSM-5. A single set of criteria will be utilized to diagnose catatonia across the diagnostic manual and catatonia will be a specifier for both schizophrenia and major mood disorders. Additionally, catatonia will also be a specifier for other psychotic disorders, including schizoaffective disorder, schizophreniform disorder, brief psychotic disorder, and substance-induced psychotic disorder. A new residual category of catatonia not otherwise specified will be added to allow for the rapid diagnosis and specific treatment of catatonia in severely ill patients for whom the underlying diagnosis is not immediately available. These changes should improve the consistent recognition of catatonia across the range of psychiatric disorders and facilitate its specific treatment.
Published by Elsevier B.V.
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3 MeSH Terms
Definition and description of schizophrenia in the DSM-5.
Tandon R, Gaebel W, Barch DM, Bustillo J, Gur RE, Heckers S, Malaspina D, Owen MJ, Schultz S, Tsuang M, Van Os J, Carpenter W
(2013) Schizophr Res 150: 3-10
MeSH Terms: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Humans, Schizophrenia
Show Abstract · Added February 12, 2015
Although dementia praecox or schizophrenia has been considered a unique disease for over a century, its definitions and boundaries have changed over this period and its etiology and pathophysiology remain elusive. Despite changing definitions, DSM-IV schizophrenia is reliably diagnosed, has fair validity and conveys useful clinical information. Therefore, the essence of the broad DSM-IV definition of schizophrenia is retained in DSM-5. The clinical manifestations are extremely diverse, however, with this heterogeneity being poorly explained by the DSM-IV clinical subtypes and course specifiers. Additionally, the boundaries of schizophrenia are imprecisely demarcated from schizoaffective disorder and other diagnostic categories and its special emphasis on Schneiderian "first-rank" symptoms appears misplaced. Changes in the definition of schizophrenia in DSM-5 seek to address these shortcomings and incorporate the new information about the nature of the disorder accumulated over the past two decades. Specific changes in its definition include elimination of the classic subtypes, addition of unique psychopathological dimensions, clarification of cross-sectional and longitudinal course specifiers, elimination of special treatment of Schneiderian 'first-rank symptoms', better delineation of schizophrenia from schizoaffective disorder, and clarification of the relationship of schizophrenia to catatonia. These changes should improve diagnosis and characterization of individuals with schizophrenia and facilitate measurement-based treatment and concurrently provide a more useful platform for research that will elucidate its nature and permit a more precise future delineation of the 'schizophrenias'.
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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3 MeSH Terms
Attenuated psychosis syndrome in DSM-5.
Tsuang MT, Van Os J, Tandon R, Barch DM, Bustillo J, Gaebel W, Gur RE, Heckers S, Malaspina D, Owen MJ, Schultz S, Carpenter W
(2013) Schizophr Res 150: 31-5
MeSH Terms: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Humans, Psychotic Disorders, Risk Factors, Schizophrenia, Schizophrenic Psychology
Show Abstract · Added February 12, 2015
Despite advances in the treatment of schizophrenia over the past half-century, the illness is frequently associated with a poor outcome. This is principally related to the late identification and intervention in the course of the illness by which time patients have experienced a substantial amount of socio-occupational decline that can be difficult to reverse. The emphasis has therefore shifted to defining psychosis-risk syndromes and evaluating treatments that can prevent transition to psychosis in these ultra-high risk groups. To consider the appropriateness of adding psychosis risk syndrome to our diagnostic nomenclature, the psychotic disorders work group extensively reviewed all available data, consulted a range of experts, and carefully considered the variety of expert and public comments on the topic. It was clear that reliable methods were available to define a syndrome characterized by sub-threshold psychotic symptoms (in severity or duration) and which was associated with a very significant increase in the risk of development of a full-fledged psychotic disorder (schizophrenia spectrum, psychotic mood disorder, and other psychotic disorders) within the next year. At the same time, the majority of individuals with "attenuated psychotic symptoms" had one or more other current psychiatric comorbid conditions (usually mood or anxiety disorders, substance use disorder; Fusar-Poli 2012) and exhibited a range of psychiatric outcomes other than conversion to psychosis (significant proportions either fully recover or develop some other psychiatric disorder, with a minority developing a psychotic disorder). Although the reliability of the diagnosis is well established in academic and research settings, it was found to be less so in community and other clinical settings. Furthermore, the nosological relationship of attenuated psychosis syndrome (APS) to schizotypal personality disorder and other psychiatric conditions was unclear. Further study will hopefully resolve these questions. The work group decided to recommend the inclusion of attenuated psychosis syndrome as a category in the appendix (Section 3) of DSM-5 as a condition for further study.
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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6 MeSH Terms
Schizoaffective Disorder in the DSM-5.
Malaspina D, Owen MJ, Heckers S, Tandon R, Bustillo J, Schultz S, Barch DM, Gaebel W, Gur RE, Tsuang M, Van Os J, Carpenter W
(2013) Schizophr Res 150: 21-5
MeSH Terms: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Humans, Mood Disorders, Psychotic Disorders
Show Abstract · Added February 12, 2015
Characterization of patients with both psychotic and mood symptoms, either concurrently or at different points during their illness, has always posed a nosological challenge and this is reflected in the poor reliability, low diagnostic stability, and questionable validity of DSM-IV Schizoaffective Disorder. The clinical reality of the frequent co-occurrence of psychosis and Mood Episodes has also resulted in over-utilization of a diagnostic category that was originally intended to only rarely be needed. In the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition, an effort is made to improve reliability of this condition by providing more specific criteria and the concept of Schizoaffective Disorder shifts from an episode diagnosis in DSM-IV to a life-course of the illness in DSM-5. When psychotic symptoms occur exclusively during a Mood Episode, DSM-5 indicates that the diagnosis is the appropriate Mood Disorder with Psychotic Features, but when such a psychotic condition includes at least a two-week period of psychosis without prominent mood symptoms, the diagnosis may be either Schizoaffective Disorder or Schizophrenia. In the DSM-5, the diagnosis of Schizoaffective Disorder can be made only if full Mood Disorder episodes have been present for the majority of the total active and residual course of illness, from the onset of psychotic symptoms up until the current diagnosis. In earlier DSM versions the boundary between Schizophrenia and Schizoaffective Disorder was only qualitatively defined, leading to poor reliability. This change will provide a clearer separation between Schizophrenia with mood symptoms from Schizoaffective Disorder and will also likely reduce rates of diagnosis of Schizoaffective Disorder while increasing the stability of this diagnosis once made.
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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4 MeSH Terms
Structure of the psychotic disorders classification in DSM-5.
Heckers S, Barch DM, Bustillo J, Gaebel W, Gur R, Malaspina D, Owen MJ, Schultz S, Tandon R, Tsuang M, Van Os J, Carpenter W
(2013) Schizophr Res 150: 11-4
MeSH Terms: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Humans, Psychotic Disorders
Show Abstract · Added February 12, 2015
Schizophrenia spectrum disorders attract great interest among clinicians, researchers, and the lay public. While the diagnostic features of schizophrenia have remained unchanged for more than 100 years, the mechanism of illness has remained elusive. There is increasing evidence that the categorical diagnosis of schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders contributes to this lack of progress. The 5th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) continues the categorical classification of psychiatric disorders since the research needed to establish a new nosology of equal or greater validity is lacking. However, even within a categorical system, the DSM-5 aims to capture the underlying dimensional structure of psychosis. The domains of psychopathology that define psychotic disorders are presented not simply as features of schizophrenia. The level, the number, and the duration of psychotic signs and symptoms are used to demarcate psychotic disorders from each other. Finally, the categorical assessment is complemented with a dimensional assessment of psychosis that allows for more specific and individualized assessment of patients. The structure of psychosis as outlined in the DSM-5 may serve as a stepping-stone towards a more valid classification system, as we await new data to redefine psychotic disorders.
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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3 MeSH Terms
Logic and justification for dimensional assessment of symptoms and related clinical phenomena in psychosis: relevance to DSM-5.
Barch DM, Bustillo J, Gaebel W, Gur R, Heckers S, Malaspina D, Owen MJ, Schultz S, Tandon R, Tsuang M, Van Os J, Carpenter W
(2013) Schizophr Res 150: 15-20
MeSH Terms: Behavioral Symptoms, Cognition Disorders, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Hallucinations, Humans, Logic, Psychotic Disorders
Show Abstract · Added February 12, 2015
Work on the causes and treatment of schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders has long recognized the heterogeneity of the symptoms that can be displayed by individuals with these illnesses. Further, researchers have increasingly emphasized the ways in which the severity of different symptoms of this illness can vary across individuals, and have provided evidence that the severity of such symptoms can predict other important aspects of the illness, such as the degree of cognitive and/or neurobiological deficits. Additionally, research has increasingly emphasized that the boundaries between nosological entities may not be categorical and that the comorbidity of disorders may reflect impairments in common dimensions of genetic variation, human behavior and neurobiological function. As such, it is critical to focus on a dimensional approach to the assessment of symptoms and clinically relevant phenomena in psychosis, so as to increase attention to and understanding of the causes and consequences of such variation. In the current article, we review the logic and justification for including dimensional assessment of clinical symptoms in the evaluation of psychosis in the Fifth Edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM-5).
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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7 MeSH Terms
Altered mental status in older patients in the emergency department.
Han JH, Wilber ST
(2013) Clin Geriatr Med 29: 101-36
MeSH Terms: Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Coma, Delirium, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Emergency Service, Hospital, Geriatric Assessment, Humans, Mental Disorders, Mental Status Schedule, Risk Factors, Severity of Illness Index, Stupor
Show Abstract · Added May 27, 2014
Altered mental status is a common chief compliant among older patients in the emergency department (ED). Acute changes in mental status are more concerning and are usually secondary to delirium, stupor, and coma. Although stupor and coma are easily identifiable, the clinical presentation of delirium can be subtle and is often missed without actively screening for it. For patients with acute changes in mental status the ED evaluation should focus on searching for the underlying etiology. Infection is one of the most common precipitants of delirium, but multiple causes may exist concurrently.
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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13 MeSH Terms
Is there a general factor of prevalent psychopathology during adulthood?
Lahey BB, Applegate B, Hakes JK, Zald DH, Hariri AR, Rathouz PJ
(2012) J Abnorm Psychol 121: 971-7
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Comorbidity, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Factor Analysis, Statistical, Female, Humans, Interview, Psychological, Male, Mental Disorders, Middle Aged, Models, Psychological, Prevalence
Show Abstract · Added May 27, 2014
The patterns of comorbidity among prevalent mental disorders in adults lead them to load on "externalizing," "distress," and "fears" factors. These factors are themselves robustly correlated, but little attention has been paid to this fact. As a first step in studying the implications of these interfactor correlations, we conducted confirmatory factor analyses on diagnoses of 11 prevalent Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.) mental disorders in a nationally representative sample. A model specifying correlated externalizing, distress, and fears factors fit well, but an alternative model was tested in which a "general" bifactor was added to capture what these disorders share in common. There was a modest but significant improvement in fit for the bifactor model relative to the 3-factor oblique model, with all disorders loading strongly on the bifactor. Tests of external validity revealed that the fears, distress, and externalizing factors were differentially associated with measures of functioning and potential risk factors. Nonetheless, the general bifactor accounted for significant independent variance in future psychopathology, functioning, and other criteria over and above the fears, distress, and externalizing factors. These findings support the hypothesis that these prevalent forms of psychopathology have both important common and unique features. Future studies should determine whether this is because they share elements of their etiology and neurobiological mechanisms. If so, the existence of common features across diverse forms of prevalent psychopathology could have important implications for understanding the nature, etiology, and outcomes of psychopathology.
(PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).
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13 MeSH Terms