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Inhibition of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Activation Is Associated With Improved Diabetic Nephropathy and Insulin Resistance in Type 2 Diabetes.
Li Z, Li Y, Overstreet JM, Chung S, Niu A, Fan X, Wang S, Wang Y, Zhang MZ, Harris RC
(2018) Diabetes 67: 1847-1857
MeSH Terms: Albuminuria, Animals, Biomarkers, Crosses, Genetic, Cytokines, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Diabetic Nephropathies, ErbB Receptors, Erlotinib Hydrochloride, Fibrosis, Glomerulonephritis, Hypoglycemic Agents, Insulin Resistance, Kidney, Macrophages, Membrane Transport Modulators, Mice, Knockout, Mice, Mutant Strains, Nitric Oxide Synthase Type III, Oxidative Stress, Protein Kinase Inhibitors, T-Lymphocytes, Transforming Growth Factor alpha
Show Abstract · Added November 9, 2018
Previous studies by us and others have indicated that renal epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) are activated in models of diabetic nephropathy (DN) and that inhibition of EGFR activity protects against progressive DN in type 1 diabetes. In this study we examined whether inhibition of EGFR activation would affect the development of DN in a mouse model of accelerated type 2 diabetes (BKS with endothelial nitric oxide knockout [eNOS]). eNOS mice received vehicle or erlotinib, an inhibitor of EGFR tyrosine kinase activity, beginning at 8 weeks of age and were sacrificed at 20 weeks of age. In addition, genetic models inhibiting EGFR activity () and transforming growth factor-α () were studied in this model of DN in type 2 diabetes. Compared with vehicle-treated mice, erlotinib-treated animals had less albuminuria and glomerulosclerosis, less podocyte loss, and smaller amounts of renal profibrotic and fibrotic components. Erlotinib treatment decreased renal oxidative stress, macrophage and T-lymphocyte infiltration, and the production of proinflammatory cytokines. Erlotinib treatment also preserved pancreas function, and these mice had higher blood insulin levels at 20 weeks, decreased basal blood glucose levels, increased glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, and increased blood levels of adiponectin compared with vehicle-treated mice. Similar to the aforementioned results, both and diabetic mice also had attenuated DN, preserved pancreas function, and decreased basal blood glucose levels. In this mouse model of accelerated DN, inhibition of EGFR signaling led to increased longevity.
© 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.
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23 MeSH Terms
Imaging mass spectrometry reveals direct albumin fragmentation within the diabetic kidney.
Grove KJ, Lareau NM, Voziyan PA, Zeng F, Harris RC, Hudson BG, Caprioli RM
(2018) Kidney Int 94: 292-302
MeSH Terms: Albumins, Albuminuria, Animals, Cathepsin D, Diabetic Nephropathies, Disease Models, Animal, Frozen Sections, Humans, Kidney Glomerulus, Kidney Tubules, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Molecular Imaging, Nitric Oxide Synthase Type III, Proteolysis, Renal Elimination, Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization
Show Abstract · Added May 29, 2018
Albumin degradation in the renal tubules is impaired in diabetic nephropathy such that levels of the resulting albumin fragments increase with the degree of renal injury. However, the mechanism of albumin degradation is unknown. In particular, fragmentation of the endogenous native albumin has not been demonstrated in the kidney and the enzymes that may contribute to fragmentation have not been identified. To explore this we utilized matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry for molecular profiling of specific renal regions without disturbing distinct tissue morphology. Changes in protein expression were measured in kidney sections of eNOSdb/db mice, a model of diabetic nephropathy, by high spatial resolution imaging allowing molecular localizations at the level of single glomeruli and tubules. Significant increases were found in the relative abundances of several albumin fragments in the kidney of the mice with diabetic nephropathy compared with control nondiabetic mice. The relative abundance of fragments detected correlated positively with the degree of nephropathy. Furthermore, specific albumin fragments accumulating in the lumen of diabetic renal tubules were identified and predicted the enzymatic action of cathepsin D based on cleavage specificity and in vitro digestions. Importantly, this was demonstrated directly in the renal tissue with the endogenous nonlabeled murine albumin. Thus, our results provide molecular insights into the mechanism of albumin degradation in diabetic nephropathy.
Copyright © 2018 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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17 MeSH Terms
Risk of Hypoglycemia Following Hospital Discharge in Patients With Diabetes and Acute Kidney Injury.
Hung AM, Siew ED, Wilson OD, Perkins AM, Greevy RA, Horner J, Abdel-Kader K, Parr SK, Roumie CL, Griffin MR, Ikizler TA, Speroff T, Matheny ME
(2018) Diabetes Care 41: 503-512
MeSH Terms: Acute Kidney Injury, Adult, Aged, Blood Glucose, Diabetes Mellitus, Diabetic Nephropathies, Female, Glipizide, Glyburide, Humans, Hypoglycemia, Kidney Function Tests, Male, Middle Aged, Patient Discharge, Retrospective Studies, Risk Factors
Show Abstract · Added November 29, 2018
OBJECTIVE - Hypoglycemia is common in patients with diabetes. The risk of hypoglycemia after acute kidney injury (AKI) is not well defined. The purpose of this study was to compare the risk for postdischarge hypoglycemia among hospitalized patients with diabetes who do and do not experience AKI.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - We performed a propensity-matched analysis of patients with diabetes, with and without AKI, using a retrospective national cohort of veterans hospitalized between 2004 and 2012. AKI was defined as a 0.3 mg/dL or 50% increase in serum creatinine from baseline to peak serum creatinine during hospitalization. Hypoglycemia was defined as hospital admission or an emergency department visit for hypoglycemia or as an outpatient blood glucose <60 mg/dL. Time to incident hypoglycemia within 90 days postdischarge was examined using Cox proportional hazards models. Prespecified subgroup analyses by renal recovery, baseline chronic kidney disease, preadmission drug regimen, and HbA were performed.
RESULTS - We identified 65,151 propensity score-matched pairs with and without AKI. The incidence of hypoglycemia was 29.6 (95% CI 28.9-30.4) and 23.5 (95% CI 22.9-24.2) per 100 person-years for patients with and without AKI, respectively. After adjustment, AKI was associated with a 27% increased risk of hypoglycemia (hazard ratio [HR] 1.27 [95% CI 1.22-1.33]). For patients with full recovery, the HR was 1.18 (95% CI 1.12-1.25); for partial recovery, the HR was 1.30 (95% CI 1.23-1.37); and for no recovery, the HR was 1.48 (95% CI 1.36-1.60) compared with patients without AKI. Across all antidiabetes drug regimens, patients with AKI experienced hypoglycemia more frequently than patients without AKI, though the incidence of hypoglycemia was highest among insulin users, followed by glyburide and glipizide users, respectively.
CONCLUSIONS - AKI is a risk factor for hypoglycemia in the postdischarge period. Studies to identify risk-reduction strategies in this population are warranted.
© 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.
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MeSH Terms
Acute kidney injury is a risk factor for subsequent proteinuria.
Parr SK, Matheny ME, Abdel-Kader K, Greevy RA, Bian A, Fly J, Chen G, Speroff T, Hung AM, Ikizler TA, Siew ED
(2018) Kidney Int 93: 460-469
MeSH Terms: Acute Kidney Injury, Aged, Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers, Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors, Antihypertensive Agents, Blood Pressure, Comorbidity, Databases, Factual, Diabetes Mellitus, Diabetic Nephropathies, Disease Progression, Female, Glomerular Filtration Rate, Hospitalization, Hospitals, Veterans, Humans, Hypertension, Kidney, Male, Middle Aged, Prevalence, Prognosis, Proteinuria, Renal Insufficiency, Chronic, Retrospective Studies, Risk Factors, Severity of Illness Index, Time Factors, United States
Show Abstract · Added November 29, 2018
Acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with subsequent chronic kidney disease (CKD), but the mechanism is unclear. To clarify this, we examined the association of AKI and new-onset or worsening proteinuria during the 12 months following hospitalization in a national retrospective cohort of United States Veterans hospitalized between 2004-2012. Patients with and without AKI were matched using baseline demographics, comorbidities, proteinuria, estimated glomerular filtration rate, blood pressure, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin II receptor blocker (ACEI/ARB) use, and inpatient exposures linked to AKI. The distribution of proteinuria over one year post-discharge in the matched cohort was compared using inverse probability sampling weights. Subgroup analyses were based on diabetes, pre-admission ACEI/ARB use, and AKI severity. Among the 90,614 matched AKI and non-AKI pairs, the median estimated glomerular filtration rate was 62 mL/min/1.73m. The prevalence of diabetes and hypertension were 48% and 78%, respectively. The odds of having one plus or greater dipstick proteinuria was significantly higher during each month of follow-up in patients with AKI than in patients without AKI (odds ratio range 1.20-1.39). Odds were higher in patients with Stage II or III AKI (odds ratios 1.32-1.81) than in Stage I AKI (odds ratios 1.18-1.32), using non-AKI as the reference group. Results were consistent regardless of diabetes status or baseline ACEI/ARB use. Thus, AKI is a risk factor for incident or worsening proteinuria, suggesting a possible mechanism linking AKI and future CKD. The type of proteinuria, physiology, and clinical significance warrant further study as a potentially modifiable risk factor in the pathway from AKI to CKD.
Published by Elsevier Inc.
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29 MeSH Terms
Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor Antagonism Protects against Diabetic Nephropathy in a Type 2 Diabetic Model.
Zhang MZ, Wang X, Yang H, Fogo AB, Murphy BJ, Kaltenbach R, Cheng P, Zinker B, Harris RC
(2017) J Am Soc Nephrol 28: 3300-3311
MeSH Terms: Animals, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Diabetic Nephropathies, Disease Models, Animal, Mice, Receptors, Lysophosphatidic Acid
Show Abstract · Added May 29, 2018
Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) functions through activation of LPA receptors (LPARs). LPA-LPAR signaling has been implicated in development of fibrosis. However, the role of LPA-LPAR signaling in development of diabetic nephropathy (DN) has not been studied. We examined whether BMS002, a novel dual LPAR1 and LPAR3 antagonist, affects development of DN in endothelial nitric oxide synthase-knockout mice. Treatment of these mice with BMS002 from 8 to 20 weeks of age led to a significant reduction in albuminuria, similar to that observed with renin-angiotensin system inhibition (losartan plus enalapril). LPAR inhibition also prevented the decline in GFR observed in vehicle-treated mice, such that GFR at week 20 differed significantly between vehicle and LPAR inhibitor groups (<0.05). LPAR inhibition also reduced histologic glomerular injury; decreased the expression of profibrotic and fibrotic components, including fibronectin, -smooth muscle actin, connective tissue growth factor, collagen I, and TGF-; and reduced renal macrophage infiltration and oxidative stress. Notably, LPAR inhibition slowed podocyte loss (podocytes per glomerulus ±SEM at 8 weeks: 667±40, =4; at 20 weeks: 364±18 with vehicle, =7, and 536±12 with LPAR inhibition, =7; <0.001 versus vehicle). Finally, LPAR inhibition minimized the production of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), a marker of oxidative stress, in podocytes and increased the phosphorylation of AKT2, an indicator of AKT2 activity, in kidneys. Thus, the LPAR antagonist BMS002 protects against GFR decline and attenuates development of DN through multiple mechanisms. LPAR antagonism might provide complementary beneficial effects to renin-angiotensin system inhibition to slow progression of DN.
Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.
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MeSH Terms
The novel adipokine/hepatokine fetuin B in severe human and murine diabetic kidney disease.
Kralisch S, Hoffmann A, Klöting N, Bachmann A, Kratzsch J, Blüher M, Zhang MZ, Harris RC, Stumvoll M, Fasshauer M, Ebert T
(2017) Diabetes Metab 43: 465-468
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Animals, Cross-Sectional Studies, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Diabetic Nephropathies, Female, Fetuin-B, Humans, Male, Mice, Middle Aged, Renal Insufficiency, Chronic, Renal Replacement Therapy
Added June 2, 2017
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15 MeSH Terms
The nature and biology of basement membranes.
Pozzi A, Yurchenco PD, Iozzo RV
(2017) Matrix Biol 57-58: 1-11
MeSH Terms: Agrin, Animals, Basement Membrane, Bone Diseases, Developmental, Collagen Type IV, Diabetic Nephropathies, Extracellular Matrix, Gene Expression Regulation, Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans, Humans, Laminin, Lupus Nephritis, Mechanotransduction, Cellular, Membrane Glycoproteins, Mutation, Protein Isoforms
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2017
Basement membranes are delicate, nanoscale and pliable sheets of extracellular matrices that often act as linings or partitions in organisms. Previously considered as passive scaffolds segregating polarized cells, such as epithelial or endothelial cells, from the underlying mesenchyme, basement membranes have now reached the center stage of biology. They play a multitude of roles from blood filtration to muscle homeostasis, from storing growth factors and cytokines to controlling angiogenesis and tumor growth, from maintaining skin integrity and neuromuscular structure to affecting adipogenesis and fibrosis. Here, we will address developmental, structural and biochemical aspects of basement membranes and discuss some of the pathogenetic mechanisms causing diseases linked to abnormal basement membranes.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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16 MeSH Terms
Macrophage Cyclooxygenase-2 Protects Against Development of Diabetic Nephropathy.
Wang X, Yao B, Wang Y, Fan X, Wang S, Niu A, Yang H, Fogo A, Zhang MZ, Harris RC
(2017) Diabetes 66: 494-504
MeSH Terms: Albuminuria, Animals, Cells, Cultured, Cyclooxygenase 2, Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1, Diabetic Nephropathies, Fibrosis, Immunoblotting, Immunohistochemistry, Kidney, Macrophages, Male, Mice, Mice, Knockout, NF-kappa B, Neutrophil Infiltration, Neutrophils, Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II, Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction, Receptors, Prostaglandin E, Receptors, Prostaglandin E, EP4 Subtype, Signal Transduction, T-Lymphocytes
Show Abstract · Added April 26, 2017
Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is characterized by increased macrophage infiltration, and proinflammatory M1 macrophages contribute to development of DN. Previous studies by us and others have reported that macrophage cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) plays a role in polarization and maintenance of a macrophage tissue-reparative M2 phenotype. We examined the effects of macrophage COX-2 on development of DN in type 1 diabetes. Cultured macrophages with COX-2 deletion exhibited an M1 phenotype, as demonstrated by higher inducible nitric oxide synthase and nuclear factor-κB levels but lower interleukin-4 receptor-α levels. Compared with corresponding wild-type diabetic mice, mice with COX-2 deletion in hematopoietic cells (COX-2 knockout bone marrow transplantation) or macrophages (CD11b-Cre COX2) developed severe DN, as indicated by increased albuminuria, fibrosis, and renal infiltration of T cells, neutrophils, and macrophages. Although diabetic kidneys with macrophage COX-2 deletion had more macrophage infiltration, they had fewer renal M2 macrophages. Diabetic kidneys with macrophage COX-2 deletion also had increased endoplasmic reticulum stress and decreased number of podocytes. Similar results were found in diabetic mice with macrophage PGE receptor subtype 4 deletion. In summary, these studies have demonstrated an important but unexpected role for macrophage COX-2/prostaglandin E/PGE receptor subtype 4 signaling to lessen progression of diabetic kidney disease, unlike the pathogenic effects of increased COX-2 expression in intrinsic renal cells.
© 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.
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24 MeSH Terms
Higher protein intake is associated with increased risk for incident end-stage renal disease among blacks with diabetes in the Southern Community Cohort Study.
Malhotra R, Cavanaugh KL, Blot WJ, Ikizler TA, Lipworth L, Kabagambe EK
(2016) Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis 26: 1079-1087
MeSH Terms: Adult, African Americans, Aged, Case-Control Studies, Databases, Factual, Diabetic Nephropathies, Dietary Proteins, Energy Intake, European Continental Ancestry Group, Feeding Behavior, Female, Health Status Disparities, Humans, Incidence, Kidney Failure, Chronic, Logistic Models, Male, Middle Aged, Odds Ratio, Prospective Studies, Recommended Dietary Allowances, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Surveys and Questionnaires, Time Factors, United States
Show Abstract · Added September 17, 2016
BACKGROUND AND AIMS - Diabetes, a risk factor for end-stage renal disease (ESRD), is associated with impaired protein metabolism. We investigated whether protein intake is associated with ESRD and whether the risk is higher among blacks with diabetes.
METHODS AND RESULTS - We conducted a nested case-control study of ESRD within the Southern Community Cohort Study, a prospective study of low-income blacks and whites in the southeastern US (2002-2009). Through 2012, 1057 incident ESRD cases were identified by linkage with the United States Renal Data System and matched to 3198 controls by age, sex, and race. Dietary intakes were assessed from a validated food frequency questionnaire at baseline. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed from logistic regression models that included matching variables, BMI, education, income, hypertension, total energy intake, and percent energy from saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Mean (±SD) daily energy intake from protein was higher among ESRD cases than controls (15.7 ± 3.3 vs. 15.1 ± 3.1%, P < 0.0001). For a 1% increase in percent energy intake from protein, the adjusted ORs (95% CIs) for ESRD were 1.06 (1.02-1.10) for blacks with diabetes, 1.02 (0.98-1.06) for blacks without diabetes, 0.99 (0.90-1.09) for whites with diabetes and 0.94 (0.84-1.06) for whites without diabetes. Protein intake in g/kg/day was also associated with ESRD (4th vs. 1st quartile OR = 1.76; 95% CI: 1.17-2.65).
CONCLUSION - Our results raise the possibility that among blacks with diabetes, increased dietary protein is associated with increased incidence of ESRD. Studies on how protein intake and metabolism affect ESRD are needed.
Copyright © 2016 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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26 MeSH Terms
Aquaporin 11 variant associates with kidney disease in type 2 diabetic patients.
Choma DP, Vanacore R, Naylor H, Zimmerman IA, Pavlichenko A, Pavlichenko A, Foye L, Carbone DP, Harris RC, Dikov MM, Tchekneva EE
(2016) Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 310: F416-25
MeSH Terms: Acute Kidney Injury, Aged, Aquaporins, Chi-Square Distribution, Databases, Genetic, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Diabetic Nephropathies, Disease Progression, Female, Gene Frequency, Genetic Association Studies, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Glomerular Filtration Rate, Humans, Linear Models, Logistic Models, Male, Middle Aged, Models, Molecular, Multivariate Analysis, Phenotype, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Prevalence, Protein Conformation, Renal Insufficiency, Chronic, Retrospective Studies, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Structure-Activity Relationship
Show Abstract · Added January 4, 2016
Kidney disease, a common complication of diabetes, associates with poor prognosis. Our previous animal model studies linked aquaporin (AQP)11 to acute kidney injury, hyperglycemia-induced renal impairment, and kidney disease in diabetes. Here, we report the AQP11 rs2276415 variant as a genetic factor placing type 2 diabetic patients at greater risk for the development of kidney disease. We performed two independent retrospective case-control studies in 1,075 diabetic and 1,619 nondiabetic individuals who were identified in the Synthetic Derivative Database with DNA samples in the BioVU DNA repository at Vanderbilt University (Nashville, TN). A χ(2)-test and multivariable logistic regression analysis with adjustments for age, sex, baseline serum creatinine, and underlying comorbid disease covariates showed a significant association between rs2276415 and the prevalence of any event of acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease (CKD) in diabetic patients but not in patients without diabetes. This result was replicated in the second independent study. Diabetic CKD patients over 55 yrs old with the minor AQP11 allele had a significantly faster progression of estimated glomerular filtration rate decline than patients with the wild-type genotype. Three-dimensional structural analysis suggested a functional impairment of AQP11 with rs2276415, which could place diabetic patients at a higher risk for kidney disease. These studies identified rs2276415 as a candidate genetic factor predisposing patients with type 2 diabetes to CKD.
Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.
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29 MeSH Terms