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A compendium of G-protein-coupled receptors and cyclic nucleotide regulation of adipose tissue metabolism and energy expenditure.
Ceddia RP, Collins S
(2020) Clin Sci (Lond) 134: 473-512
MeSH Terms: Adipocytes, Adipose Tissue, Animals, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Energy Metabolism, Humans, Lipolysis, Nucleotides, Cyclic, Receptors, G-Protein-Coupled, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2020
With the ever-increasing burden of obesity and Type 2 diabetes, it is generally acknowledged that there remains a need for developing new therapeutics. One potential mechanism to combat obesity is to raise energy expenditure via increasing the amount of uncoupled respiration from the mitochondria-rich brown and beige adipocytes. With the recent appreciation of thermogenic adipocytes in humans, much effort is being made to elucidate the signaling pathways that regulate the browning of adipose tissue. In this review, we focus on the ligand-receptor signaling pathways that influence the cyclic nucleotides, cAMP and cGMP, in adipocytes. We chose to focus on G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), guanylyl cyclase and phosphodiesterase regulation of adipocytes because they are the targets of a large proportion of all currently available therapeutics. Furthermore, there is a large overlap in their signaling pathways, as signaling events that raise cAMP or cGMP generally increase adipocyte lipolysis and cause changes that are commonly referred to as browning: increasing mitochondrial biogenesis, uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) expression and respiration.
© 2020 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.
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2 Members
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10 MeSH Terms
Genome-wide meta-analysis associates GPSM1 with type 2 diabetes, a plausible gene involved in skeletal muscle function.
Ding Q, Tan ALM, Parra EJ, Cruz M, Sim X, Teo YY, Long J, Alsafar H, Petretto E, Tai ES, Chen H
(2020) J Hum Genet 65: 411-420
MeSH Terms: Animals, Asian Continental Ancestry Group, Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genome-Wide Association Study, Guanine Nucleotide Dissociation Inhibitors, Humans, Mice, Muscle, Skeletal, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified many genetic variations associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in Asians, but understanding the functional genetic variants that influence traits is often a complex process. In this study, fine mapping and other analytical strategies were performed to investigate the effects of G protein signaling modulator 1 (GPSM1) on insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. A total of 128 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within GPSM1 were analysed in 21,897 T2DM cases and 32,710 healthy controls from seven GWASs. The SNP rs28539249 in intron 9 of GPSM1 showed a nominally significant association with T2DM in Asians (OR = 1.07, 95% CI = 1.04-1.10, P < 10). The GPSM1 mRNA was increased in skeletal muscle and correlated with T2DM traits across obese mice model. An eQTL for the cis-acting regulation of GPSM1 expression in human skeletal muscle was identified for rs28539249, and the increased GPSM1 expression related with T2DM traits within GEO datasets. Another independent Asian cohort showed that rs28539249 is associated with the skeletal muscle expression of CACFD1, GTF3C5, SARDH, and FAM163B genes, which are functionally enriched for endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) and unfolded protein response (UPR) pathways. Moreover, rs28539249 locus was predicted to disrupt regulatory regions in human skeletal muscle with enriched epigenetic marks and binding affinity for CTCF. Supershift EMSA assays followed luciferase assays demonstrated the CTCF specifically binding to rs28539249-C allele leading to decreased transcriptional activity. Thus, the post-GWAS annotation confirmed the Asian-specific association of genetic variant in GPSM1 with T2DM, suggesting a role for the variant in the regulation in skeletal muscle.
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11 MeSH Terms
Lipid Droplet Accumulation in Human Pancreatic Islets Is Dependent On Both Donor Age and Health.
Tong X, Dai C, Walker JT, Nair GG, Kennedy A, Carr RM, Hebrok M, Powers AC, Stein R
(2020) Diabetes 69: 342-354
MeSH Terms: Acinar Cells, Adolescent, Adult, Age Factors, Aged, Animals, Child, Child, Preschool, Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Embryonic Stem Cells, Female, Glucagon-Secreting Cells, Humans, Infant, Insulin-Secreting Cells, Islets of Langerhans, Islets of Langerhans Transplantation, Lipid Droplets, Male, Mice, Microscopy, Electron, Microscopy, Fluorescence, Middle Aged, Rats, Tissue Donors, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 29, 2020
Human but not mouse islets transplanted into immunodeficient NSG mice effectively accumulate lipid droplets (LDs). Because chronic lipid exposure is associated with islet β-cell dysfunction, we investigated LD accumulation in the intact human and mouse pancreas over a range of ages and states of diabetes. Very few LDs were found in normal human juvenile pancreatic acinar and islet cells, with numbers subsequently increasing throughout adulthood. While accumulation appeared evenly distributed in postjuvenile acinar and islet cells in donors without diabetes, LDs were enriched in islet α- and β-cells from donors with type 2 diabetes (T2D). LDs were also found in the islet β-like cells produced from human embryonic cell-derived β-cell clusters. In contrast, LD accumulation was nearly undetectable in the adult rodent pancreas, even in hyperglycemic and hyperlipidemic models or 1.5-year-old mice. Taken together, there appear to be significant differences in pancreas islet cell lipid handling between species, and the human juvenile and adult cell populations. Moreover, our results suggest that LD enrichment could be impactful to T2D islet cell function.
© 2019 by the American Diabetes Association.
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27 MeSH Terms
Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery improves hepatic glucose metabolism and reduces plasma kisspeptin levels in morbidly obese patients with type 2 diabetes.
Flynn CR, Albaugh VL, Tamboli RA, Gregory JM, Bosompem A, Sidani RM, Winnick JJ
(2020) Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 318: G370-G374
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Anastomosis, Roux-en-Y, Blood Glucose, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Female, Glucagon, Glucose, Humans, Insulin, Kisspeptins, Liver, Male, Middle Aged, Obesity, Morbid, Treatment Outcome, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added November 12, 2019
Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) is known to improve whole-body glucose metabolism in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D), although the mechanisms are not entirely clear and are likely multifactorial. The aim of this study was to assess fasting hepatic glucose metabolism and other markers of metabolic activity before and after RYGB in patients with and without T2D. Methods: Metabolic characteristics of patients who are obese with T2D were compared with those without the disease (non-T2D) before and 1 and 6 mo after RYGB. Fasting plasma insulin and the insulin:glucagon ratio were markedly reduced as early as 1 mo after RYGB in both patients with T2D and without T2D. Despite this reduction, endogenous glucose production and fasting plasma glucose levels were lower in both groups after RYGB, with the reductions being much larger in T2D. Plasma kisspeptin, an inhibitor of insulin secretion, was reduced only in T2D after surgery. Improved hepatic glucose metabolism and lower plasma kisspeptin in T2D after RYGB may link improved hepatic function with enhanced insulin responsiveness after surgery. Our manuscript is the first, to the best of our knowledge, to present data showing that Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) lowers fasting kisspeptin levels in patients who are obese with type 2 diabetes. This lowering of kisspeptin is important because it could link improvements in liver glucose metabolism after RYGB with increased insulin responsiveness also seen after surgery.
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17 MeSH Terms
Metabolic effects of skeletal muscle-specific deletion of beta-arrestin-1 and -2 in mice.
Meister J, Bone DBJ, Godlewski G, Liu Z, Lee RJ, Vishnivetskiy SA, Gurevich VV, Springer D, Kunos G, Wess J
(2019) PLoS Genet 15: e1008424
MeSH Terms: Animals, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Diet, High-Fat, Disease Models, Animal, Glucose, Glucose Clamp Technique, Glycogen, Humans, Insulin, Insulin Resistance, Male, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Muscle, Skeletal, Obesity, Signal Transduction, beta-Arrestin 1, beta-Arrestin 2
Show Abstract · Added March 18, 2020
Type 2 diabetes (T2D) has become a major health problem worldwide. Skeletal muscle (SKM) is the key tissue for whole-body glucose disposal and utilization. New drugs aimed at improving insulin sensitivity of SKM would greatly expand available therapeutic options. β-arrestin-1 and -2 (Barr1 and Barr2, respectively) are two intracellular proteins best known for their ability to mediate the desensitization and internalization of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Recent studies suggest that Barr1 and Barr2 regulate several important metabolic functions including insulin release and hepatic glucose production. Since SKM expresses many GPCRs, including the metabolically important β2-adrenergic receptor, the goal of this study was to examine the potential roles of Barr1 and Barr2 in regulating SKM and whole-body glucose metabolism. Using SKM-specific knockout (KO) mouse lines, we showed that the loss of SKM Barr2, but not of SKM Barr1, resulted in mild improvements in glucose tolerance in diet-induced obese mice. SKM-specific Barr1- and Barr2-KO mice did not show any significant differences in exercise performance. However, lack of SKM Barr2 led to increased glycogen breakdown following a treadmill exercise challenge. Interestingly, mice that lacked both Barr1 and Barr2 in SKM showed no significant metabolic phenotypes. Thus, somewhat surprisingly, our data indicate that SKM β-arrestins play only rather subtle roles (SKM Barr2) in regulating whole-body glucose homeostasis and SKM insulin sensitivity.
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MeSH Terms
Metabolite Profiles of Incident Diabetes and Heterogeneity of Treatment Effect in the Diabetes Prevention Program.
Chen ZZ, Liu J, Morningstar J, Heckman-Stoddard BM, Lee CG, Dagogo-Jack S, Ferguson JF, Hamman RF, Knowler WC, Mather KJ, Perreault L, Florez JC, Wang TJ, Clish C, Temprosa M, Gerszten RE, Diabetes Prevention Program Research Group
(2019) Diabetes 68: 2337-2349
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Biomarkers, Cytosine, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Female, Humans, Incidence, Life Style, Male, Metabolome, Middle Aged, Risk Factors
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Novel biomarkers of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and response to preventative treatment in individuals with similar clinical risk may highlight metabolic pathways that are important in disease development. We profiled 331 metabolites in 2,015 baseline plasma samples from the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP). Cox models were used to determine associations between metabolites and incident T2D, as well as whether associations differed by treatment group (i.e., lifestyle [ILS], metformin [MET], or placebo [PLA]), over an average of 3.2 years of follow-up. We found 69 metabolites associated with incident T2D regardless of treatment randomization. In particular, cytosine was novel and associated with the lowest risk. In an exploratory analysis, 35 baseline metabolite associations with incident T2D differed across the treatment groups. Stratification by baseline levels of several of these metabolites, including specific phospholipids and AMP, modified the effect that ILS or MET had on diabetes development. Our findings highlight novel markers of diabetes risk and preventative treatment effect in individuals who are clinically at high risk and motivate further studies to validate these interactions.
© 2019 by the American Diabetes Association.
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13 MeSH Terms
Aerobic exercise training improves hepatic and muscle insulin sensitivity, but reduces splanchnic glucose uptake in obese humans with type 2 diabetes.
Gregory JM, Muldowney JA, Engelhardt BG, Tyree R, Marks-Shulman P, Silver HJ, Donahue EP, Edgerton DS, Winnick JJ
(2019) Nutr Diabetes 9: 25
MeSH Terms: Adult, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Exercise, Female, Glucose, Glucose Clamp Technique, Glucose Tolerance Test, Humans, Insulin Resistance, Liver, Male, Middle Aged, Muscle, Skeletal, Obesity
Show Abstract · Added September 3, 2019
BACKGROUND - Aerobic exercise training is known to have beneficial effects on whole-body glucose metabolism in people with type 2 diabetes (T2D). The responses of the liver to such training are less well understood. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of aerobic exercise training on splanchnic glucose uptake (SGU) and insulin-mediated suppression of endogenous glucose production (EGP) in obese subjects with T2D.
METHODS - Participants included 11 obese humans with T2D, who underwent 15 ± 2 weeks of aerobic exercise training (AEX; n = 6) or remained sedentary for 15 ± 1 weeks (SED; n = 5). After an initial screening visit, each subject underwent an oral glucose load clamp and an isoglycemic/two-step (20 and 40 mU/m/min) hyperinsulinemic clamp (ISO-clamp) to assess SGU and insulin-mediated suppression of EGP, respectively. After the intervention period, both tests were repeated.
RESULTS - In AEX, the ability of insulin to suppress EGP was improved during both the low (69 ± 9 and 80 ± 6% suppression; pre-post, respectively; p < 0.05) and high (67 ± 6 and 82 ± 4% suppression, respectively; p < 0.05) insulin infusion periods. Despite markedly improved muscle insulin sensitivity, SGU was reduced in AEX after training (22.9 ± 3.3 and 9.1 ± 6.0 g pre-post in AEX, respectively; p < 0.05).
CONCLUSIONS - In obese T2D subjects, exercise training improves whole-body glucose metabolism, in part, by improving insulin-mediated suppression of EGP and enhancing muscle glucose uptake, which occur despite reduced SGU during an oral glucose challenge.
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14 MeSH Terms
Plasma apoM and S1P levels are inversely associated with mortality in African Americans with type 2 diabetes mellitus.
Liu M, Frej C, Langefeld CD, Divers J, Bowden DW, Carr JJ, Gebre AK, Xu J, Larsson B, Dahlbäck B, Freedman BI, Parks JS
(2019) J Lipid Res 60: 1425-1431
MeSH Terms: African Americans, Apolipoproteins M, Biomarkers, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Disease-Free Survival, Female, Humans, Lysophospholipids, Male, Middle Aged, Sphingosine, Survival Rate
Show Abstract · Added January 10, 2020
apoM is a minor HDL apolipoprotein and carrier for sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). HDL apoM and S1P concentrations are inversely associated with atherosclerosis progression in rodents. We evaluated associations between plasma concentrations of S1P, plasma concentrations of apoM, and HDL apoM levels with prevalent subclinical atherosclerosis and mortality in the African American-Diabetes Heart Study participants (N = 545). Associations between plasma S1P, plasma apoM, and HDL apoM with subclinical atherosclerosis and mortality were assessed using multivariate parametric, nonparametric, and Cox proportional hazards models. At baseline, participants' median (25th percentile, 75th percentile) age was 55 (49, 62) years old and their coronary artery calcium (CAC) mass score was 26.5 (0.0, 346.5). Plasma S1P, plasma apoM, and HDL apoM were not associated with CAC. After 64 (57.6, 70.3) months of follow-up, 81 deaths were recorded. Higher concentrations of plasma S1P [odds ratio (OR) = 0.14, = 0.01] and plasma apoM (OR = 0.10, = 0.02), but not HDL apoM ( = 0.89), were associated with lower mortality after adjusting for age, sex, statin use, CAC, kidney function, and albuminuria. We conclude that plasma S1P and apoM concentrations are inversely and independently associated with mortality, but not CAC, in African Americans with type 2 diabetes after accounting for conventional risk factors.
Copyright © 2019 Liu et al.
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12 MeSH Terms
Iatrogenic Hyperinsulinemia, Not Hyperglycemia, Drives Insulin Resistance in Type 1 Diabetes as Revealed by Comparison With GCK-MODY (MODY2).
Gregory JM, Smith TJ, Slaughter JC, Mason HR, Hughey CC, Smith MS, Kandasamy B, Greeley SAW, Philipson LH, Naylor RN, Letourneau LR, Abumrad NN, Cherrington AD, Moore DJ
(2019) Diabetes 68: 1565-1576
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Female, Humans, Hyperglycemia, Hyperinsulinism, Insulin Resistance, Male, Middle Aged, Models, Theoretical, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added May 17, 2019
Although insulin resistance consistently occurs with type 1 diabetes, its predominant driver is uncertain. We therefore determined the relative contributions of hyperglycemia and iatrogenic hyperinsulinemia to insulin resistance using hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps in three participant groups ( = 10/group) with differing insulinemia and glycemia: healthy control subjects (euinsulinemia and euglycemia), glucokinase-maturity-onset diabetes of the young (GCK-MODY; euinsulinemia and hyperglycemia), and type 1 diabetes (hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia matching GCK-MODY). We assessed the contribution of hyperglycemia by comparing insulin sensitivity in control and GCK-MODY and the contribution of hyperinsulinemia by comparing GCK-MODY and type 1 diabetes. Hemoglobin A was normal in control subjects and similarly elevated for type 1 diabetes and GCK-MODY. Basal insulin levels in control subjects and GCK-MODY were nearly equal but were 2.5-fold higher in type 1 diabetes. Low-dose insulin infusion suppressed endogenous glucose production similarly in all groups and suppressed nonesterified fatty acids similarly between control subjects and GCK-MODY, but to a lesser extent for type 1 diabetes. High-dose insulin infusion stimulated glucose disposal similarly in control subjects and GCK-MODY but was 29% and 22% less effective in type 1 diabetes, respectively. Multivariable linear regression showed that insulinemia-but not glycemia-was significantly associated with muscle insulin sensitivity. These data suggest that iatrogenic hyperinsulinemia predominates in driving insulin resistance in type 1 diabetes.
© 2019 by the American Diabetes Association.
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2 Members
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12 MeSH Terms
GLP-1: Molecular mechanisms and outcomes of a complex signaling system.
Smith NK, Hackett TA, Galli A, Flynn CR
(2019) Neurochem Int 128: 94-105
MeSH Terms: Animals, Brain, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Feeding Behavior, Glucagon-Like Peptide 1, Humans, Obesity, Reward, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added December 17, 2019
Meal ingestion provokes the release of hormones and transmitters, which in turn regulate energy homeostasis and feeding behavior. One such hormone, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), has received significant attention in the treatment of obesity and diabetes due to its potent incretin effect. In addition to the peripheral actions of GLP-1, this hormone is able to alter behavior through the modulation of multiple neural circuits. Recent work that focused on elucidating the mechanisms and outcomes of GLP-1 neuromodulation led to the discovery of an impressive array of GLP-1 actions. Here, we summarize the many levels at which the GLP-1 signal adapts to different systems, with the goal being to provide a background against which to guide future research.
Copyright © 2019. Published by Elsevier Ltd.
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9 MeSH Terms