Other search tools

About this data

The publication data currently available has been vetted by Vanderbilt faculty, staff, administrators and trainees. The data itself is retrieved directly from NCBI's PubMed and is automatically updated on a weekly basis to ensure accuracy and completeness.

If you have any questions or comments, please contact us.

Results: 1 to 10 of 102

Publication Record

Connections

Actin assembly and non-muscle myosin activity drive dendrite retraction in an UNC-6/Netrin dependent self-avoidance response.
Sundararajan L, Smith CJ, Watson JD, Millis BA, Tyska MJ, Miller DM
(2019) PLoS Genet 15: e1008228
MeSH Terms: Actin Cytoskeleton, Actin-Related Protein 2-3 Complex, Actins, Animals, Caenorhabditis elegans, Caenorhabditis elegans Proteins, Dendritic Cells, Membrane Proteins, Myosin Heavy Chains, Nerve Tissue Proteins, Netrins, Neurons, Nonmuscle Myosin Type IIB
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Dendrite growth is constrained by a self-avoidance response that induces retraction but the downstream pathways that balance these opposing mechanisms are unknown. We have proposed that the diffusible cue UNC-6(Netrin) is captured by UNC-40(DCC) for a short-range interaction with UNC-5 to trigger self-avoidance in the C. elegans PVD neuron. Here we report that the actin-polymerizing proteins UNC-34(Ena/VASP), WSP-1(WASP), UNC-73(Trio), MIG-10(Lamellipodin) and the Arp2/3 complex effect dendrite retraction in the self-avoidance response mediated by UNC-6(Netrin). The paradoxical idea that actin polymerization results in shorter rather than longer dendrites is explained by our finding that NMY-1 (non-muscle myosin II) is necessary for retraction and could therefore mediate this effect in a contractile mechanism. Our results also show that dendrite length is determined by the antagonistic effects on the actin cytoskeleton of separate sets of effectors for retraction mediated by UNC-6(Netrin) versus outgrowth promoted by the DMA-1 receptor. Thus, our findings suggest that the dendrite length depends on an intrinsic mechanism that balances distinct modes of actin assembly for growth versus retraction.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms
High dietary salt-induced dendritic cell activation underlies microbial dysbiosis-associated hypertension.
Ferguson JF, Aden LA, Barbaro NR, Van Beusecum JP, Xiao L, Simmons AJ, Warden C, Pasic L, Himmel LE, Washington MK, Revetta FL, Zhao S, Kumaresan S, Scholz MB, Tang Z, Chen G, Reilly MP, Kirabo A
(2019) JCI Insight 5:
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adoptive Transfer, Adult, Angiotensin II, Animals, Aorta, Bacteria, Blood Pressure, CD11c Antigen, Colon, Cytokines, Dendritic Cells, Disease Models, Animal, Dysbiosis, Female, Gastrointestinal Microbiome, Humans, Hypertension, Inflammation, Lipids, Lymph Nodes, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Middle Aged, Myeloid Cells, Peyer's Patches, RNA, Ribosomal, 16S, Sodium Chloride, Sodium Chloride, Dietary, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Excess dietary salt contributes to inflammation and hypertension via poorly understood mechanisms. Antigen presenting cells including dendritic cells (DCs) play a key role in regulating intestinal immune homeostasis in part by surveying the gut epithelial surface for pathogens. Previously, we found that highly reactive γ-ketoaldehydes or isolevuglandins (IsoLGs) accumulate in DCs and act as neoantigens, promoting an autoimmune-like state and hypertension. We hypothesized that excess dietary salt alters the gut microbiome leading to hypertension and this is associated with increased immunogenic IsoLG-adduct formation in myeloid antigen presenting cells. To test this hypothesis, we performed fecal microbiome analysis and measured blood pressure of healthy human volunteers with salt intake above or below the American Heart Association recommendations. We also performed 16S rRNA analysis on cecal samples of mice fed normal or high salt diets. In humans and mice, high salt intake was associated with changes in the gut microbiome reflecting an increase in Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and genus Prevotella bacteria. These alterations were associated with higher blood pressure in humans and predisposed mice to vascular inflammation and hypertension in response to a sub-pressor dose of angiotensin II. Mice fed a high salt diet exhibited increased intestinal inflammation including the mesenteric arterial arcade and aorta, with a marked increase in the B7 ligand CD86 and formation of IsoLG-protein adducts in CD11c+ myeloid cells. Adoptive transfer of fecal material from conventionally housed high salt-fed mice to germ-free mice predisposed them to increased intestinal inflammation and hypertension. These findings provide novel insight into the mechanisms underlying inflammation and hypertension associated with excess dietary salt and may lead to interventions targeting the microbiome to prevent and treat this important disease.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
31 MeSH Terms
Picturing Polarized Myeloid Phagocytes and Regulatory Cells by Mass Cytometry.
Roussel M, Bartkowiak T, Irish JM
(2019) Methods Mol Biol 1989: 217-226
MeSH Terms: Cytokines, Dendritic Cells, Flow Cytometry, Humans, Mass Spectrometry, Monocytes, Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells, Phagocytes, Phenotype, Single-Cell Analysis
Show Abstract · Added May 13, 2019
The immune monocyte/phagocyte system (MPS) includes numerous cell subsets of the myeloid lineage including monocyte, macrophage, and dendritic cell (DC) populations that are heterogeneous both phenotypically and functionally. Previously, we characterized these diverse MPS phenotypes with multi-parametric mass cytometry (CyTOF). In order to expansively characterize monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells, a CyTOF panel was designed to measure 35 identity-, activation-, and polarization-markers. Here we provide a protocol to define a reference map for the myeloid compartment, including sample preparation, to produce reference cell subsets from the monocyte/phagocyte system. In particular, we focused on monocyte-derived macrophages that were further polarized in vitro with cytokine stimulation (i.e., M-CSF, GM-CSF, IL-4, IL-10, IFNγ, and LPS), as well as monocyte-derived DCs, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), generated in vitro from human bone marrow and/or peripheral blood.
3 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
10 MeSH Terms
FcγRIIb on CD11c cells modulates serum cholesterol and triglyceride levels and differentially affects atherosclerosis in male and female Ldlr mice.
Marvin J, Rhoads JP, Major AS
(2019) Atherosclerosis 285: 108-119
MeSH Terms: Animals, Atherosclerosis, CD11 Antigens, Cholesterol, Dendritic Cells, Female, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Receptors, IgG, Sex Factors, Triglycerides
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2020
BACKGROUND AND AIMS - Circulating levels of oxidized lipoprotein (oxLDL) correlate with myocardial infarction risk and atherosclerosis severity. Our previous study demonstrates that oxLDL immune complexes (oxLDL-ICs) can signal through FcγRs on bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) and enhance their activation and inflammatory cytokine secretion. While global FcγR studies have shown that activating FcγRs are proatherogenic, the role of the inhibitory FcγRIIb is unclear. We sought to determine the role of DC-specific FcγRIIb in atherosclerosis.
METHODS - Bone marrow chimeras were generated by rescuing lethally irradiated Ldlr mice with hematopoietic cells from littermate CD11c-Cre or CD11c-CreFcgr2b donors. Four weeks following transplant, recipients were placed on a Western diet for eight weeks. Various tissues and organs were analyzed for differences in inflammation.
RESULTS - Quantitation of atherosclerosis in the proximal aorta demonstrated a 58% increase in female CD11c-CreFcgr2b recipients, but a surprising 44% decrease in male recipients. Hepatic cholesterol and triglycerides were increased in female CD11c-CreFcgr2b recipients. This was associated with an increase in CD36 and MHC Class II expression on hepatic CD11cCD11b DCs in female livers. In contrast, male CD11c-CreFcgr2b recipients had decreased hepatic lipids with a corresponding decrease in CD36 and MHC Class II expression on CD11c cells. Interestingly, both sexes of CD11c-CreFcgr2b recipients had significant decreases in serum cholesterol and TGs with corresponding decreases in liver Fasn transcripts.
CONCLUSIONS - The absence of FcγRIIb expression on CD11c cells results in sex-dependent alteration in liver inflammation influencing atherogenesis and sex-independent modulation of serum cholesterol and TGs.
Published by Elsevier B.V.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
12 MeSH Terms
VacA Targets Myeloid Cells in the Gastric Lamina Propria To Promote Peripherally Induced Regulatory T-Cell Differentiation and Persistent Infection.
Altobelli A, Bauer M, Velez K, Cover TL, Müller A
(2019) mBio 10:
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bacterial Proteins, Cell Differentiation, Dendritic Cells, Disease Models, Animal, Gastric Mucosa, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Immune Evasion, Interleukin-10, Interleukin-23, Lung, Macrophages, Mice, Mucous Membrane, Myeloid Cells, T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory, Transforming Growth Factor beta
Show Abstract · Added April 11, 2019
The gastric bacterium causes a persistent infection that is directly responsible for gastric ulcers and gastric cancer in some patients and protective against allergic and other immunological disorders in others. The two outcomes of the -host interaction can be modeled in mice that are infected as immunocompetent adults and as neonates, respectively. Here, we have investigated the contribution of the immunomodulator VacA to -specific local and systemic immune responses in both models. We found that neonatally infected mice are colonized at higher levels than mice infected as adults and fail to generate effector T-cell responses to the bacteria; rather, T-cell responses in neonatally infected mice are skewed toward Foxp3-positive (Foxp3) regulatory T cells that are neuropilin negative and express RORγt. We found these peripherally induced regulatory T cells (pTregs) to be enriched, in a VacA-dependent manner, not only in the gastric mucosa but also in the lungs of infected mice. Pulmonary pTreg accumulation was observed in mice that have been infected neonatally with wild-type but not in mice that have been infected as adults or mice infected with a VacA null mutant. Finally, we traced VacA to gastric lamina propria myeloid cells and show that it suppressed interleukin-23 (IL-23) expression by dendritic cells and induced IL-10 and TGF-β expression in macrophages. Taken together, the results are consistent with the idea that creates a tolerogenic environment through its immunomodulator VacA, which skews T-cell responses toward Tregs, favors persistence, and affects immunity at distant sites. has coexisted with humans for at least 60.000 years and has evolved persistence strategies that allow it to evade host immunity and colonize its host for life. The VacA protein is expressed by all strains and is required for high-level persistent infection in experimental mouse models. Here, we show that VacA targets myeloid cells in the gastric mucosa to create a tolerogenic environment that facilitates regulatory T-cell differentiation, while suppressing effector T-cell priming and functionality. Tregs that are induced in the periphery during infection can be found not only in the stomach but also in the lungs of infected mice, where they are likely to affect immune responses to allergens.
Copyright © 2019 Altobelli et al.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
18 MeSH Terms
Intestinal host defense outcome is dictated by PGE production during efferocytosis of infected cells.
Dejani NN, Orlando AB, Niño VE, Penteado LA, Verdan FF, Bazzano JMR, Codo AC, Salina ACG, Saraiva AC, Avelar MR, Spolidorio LC, Serezani CH, Medeiros AI
(2018) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 115: E8469-E8478
MeSH Terms: Animals, Citrobacter rodentium, Colitis, Dendritic Cells, Dinoprostone, Enterobacteriaceae Infections, Female, Intestines, Macrophages, Mice, Receptors, Prostaglandin E, EP4 Subtype
Show Abstract · Added March 18, 2020
Inflammatory responses are terminated by the clearance of dead cells, a process termed efferocytosis. A consequence of efferocytosis is the synthesis of the antiinflammatory mediators TGF-β, PGE, and IL-10; however, the efferocytosis of infected cells favors Th17 responses by eliciting the synthesis of TGF-β, IL-6, and IL-23. Recently, we showed that the efferocytosis of apoptotic -infected macrophages by dendritic cells triggers PGE production in addition to pro-Th17 cytokine expression. We therefore examined the role of PGE during Th17 differentiation and intestinal pathology. The efferocytosis of apoptotic -infected cells by dendritic cells promoted high levels of PGE, which impaired IL-1R expression via the EP4-PKA pathway in T cells and consequently inhibited Th17 differentiation. The outcome of murine intestinal infection was dependent on the EP4 receptor. Infected mice treated with EP4 antagonist showed enhanced intestinal defense against compared with infected mice treated with vehicle control. Those results suggest that EP4 signaling during infectious colitis could be targeted as a way to enhance Th17 immunity and host defense.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms
Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells and Pulmonary Hypertension.
Bryant AJ, Mehrad B, Brusko TM, West JD, Moldawer LL
(2018) Int J Mol Sci 19:
MeSH Terms: Animals, Dendritic Cells, Humans, Hypertension, Pulmonary, Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells, Receptors, Interleukin-8B, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
Myeloid⁻derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) comprised a heterogeneous subset of bone marrow⁻derived myeloid cells, best studied in cancer research, that are increasingly implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary vascular remodeling and the development of pulmonary hypertension. Stem cell transplantation represents one extreme interventional strategy for ablating the myeloid compartment but poses a number of translational challenges. There remains an outstanding need for additional therapeutic targets to impact MDSC function, including the potential to alter interactions with innate and adaptive immune subsets, or alternatively, alter trafficking receptors, metabolic pathways, and transcription factor signaling with readily available and safe drugs. In this review, we summarize the current literature on the role of myeloid cells in the development of pulmonary hypertension, first in pulmonary circulation changes associated with myelodysplastic syndromes, and then by examining intrinsic myeloid cell changes that contribute to disease progression in pulmonary hypertension. We then outline several tractable targets and pathways relevant to pulmonary hypertension via MDSC regulation. Identifying these MDSC-regulated effectors is part of an ongoing effort to impact the field of pulmonary hypertension research through identification of myeloid compartment-specific therapeutic applications in the treatment of pulmonary vasculopathies.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms
Graphene oxide polarizes iNKT cells for production of TGFβ and attenuates inflammation in an iNKT cell-mediated sepsis model.
Lee SW, Park HJ, Van Kaer L, Hong S, Hong S
(2018) Sci Rep 8: 10081
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antigens, CD1d, Cell Polarity, Dendritic Cells, Disease Models, Animal, Galactosylceramides, Graphite, Humans, Inflammation, Intraepithelial Lymphocytes, Lymphocyte Activation, Mice, Nanotubes, Carbon, Natural Killer T-Cells, Sepsis, Toll-Like Receptor 4, Transforming Growth Factor beta
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Graphene oxide (GO) modulates the functions of antigen-presenting cells including dendritic cells (DCs). Although carbon nanotubes affect expression of the MHC class I-like CD1d molecule, whether GO can influence immune responses of CD1d-dependent invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells remains unclear. Here, we investigated the impact of GO on inflammatory responses mediated by α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer), an iNKT cell agonist. We found that in vivo GO treatment substantially inhibited the capacity of α-GalCer to induce the iNKT cell-mediated trans-activation of and cytokine production by innate and innate-like cells, including DCs, macrophages, NK cells, and γδ T cells. Such effects of GO on α-GalCer-induced inflammatory responses closely correlated with iNKT cell polarization towards TGFβ production, which also explains the capacity of GO to expand regulatory T cells. Interestingly, the absence of TLR4, a receptor for GO, failed to downregulate, and instead partially enhanced the anti-inflammatory activity of GO against α-GalCer-elicited responses, implying negative effects of TLR4 signaling on the anti-inflammatory properties of GO. By employing an α-GalCer-induced sepsis model, we further demonstrated that GO treatment significantly protected mice from α-GalCer-induced lethality. Taken together, we provide strong evidence that GO holds promise as an adjuvant to modulate iNKT cell responses for immunotherapy.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
17 MeSH Terms
Lung Dendritic Cells Drive Natural Killer Cytotoxicity in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease via IL-15Rα.
Finch DK, Stolberg VR, Ferguson J, Alikaj H, Kady MR, Richmond BW, Polosukhin VV, Blackwell TS, McCloskey L, Curtis JL, Freeman CM
(2018) Am J Respir Crit Care Med 198: 1140-1150
MeSH Terms: Aged, Animals, Cigarette Smoking, Cytotoxins, Dendritic Cells, Disease Models, Animal, Epithelial Cells, Female, Flow Cytometry, Humans, In Vitro Techniques, Interleukin-15 Receptor alpha Subunit, Killer Cells, Natural, Lymphocyte Activation, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Prospective Studies, Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2020
RATIONALE - Lung natural killer cells (NKs) kill a greater percentage of autologous lung parenchymal cells in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) than in nonobstructed smokers. To become cytotoxic, NKs require priming, typically by dendritic cells (DCs), but whether priming occurs in the lungs in COPD is unknown.
METHODS - We used lung tissue and in some cases peripheral blood from patients undergoing clinically indicated resections to determine in vitro killing of CD326 lung epithelial cells by isolated lung CD56 NKs. We also measured the cytotoxicity of unprimed blood NKs after preincubation with lung DCs. To investigate mechanisms of DC-mediated priming, we used murine models of COPD induced by cigarette smoke (CS) exposure or by polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR) deficiency, and blocked IL-15Rα (IL-15 receptor α subunit) trans-presentation by genetic and antibody approaches.
RESULTS - Human lung NKs killed isolated autologous lung epithelial cells; cytotoxicity was increased (P = 0.0001) in COPD, relative to smokers without obstruction. Similarly, increased lung NK cytotoxicity compared with control subjects was observed in CS-exposed mice and pIgR mice. Blood NKs both from smokers without obstruction and subjects with COPD showed minimal epithelial cell killing, but in COPD, preincubation with lung DCs increased cytotoxicity. NKs were primed by CS-exposed murine DCs in vitro and in vivo. Inhibiting IL-15Rα trans-presentation eliminated NK priming both by murine CS-exposed DCs and by lung DCs from subjects with COPD.
CONCLUSIONS - Heightened NK cytotoxicity against lung epithelial cells in COPD results primarily from lung DC-mediated priming via IL-15 trans-presentation on IL-15Rα. Future studies are required to test whether increased NK cytotoxicity contributes to COPD pathogenesis.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms
NF-κB is weakly activated in the NOD mouse model of type 1 diabetes.
Irvin AE, Jhala G, Zhao Y, Blackwell TS, Krishnamurthy B, Thomas HE, Kay TWH
(2018) Sci Rep 8: 4217
MeSH Terms: Animals, Dendritic Cells, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1, Disease Models, Animal, Macrophages, Mice, Mice, Inbred NOD, NF-kappa B, Transcription, Genetic
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2018
Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease characterised by selective destruction of pancreatic beta cells by the immune system. The transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) regulates innate and adaptive immune responses. Using gene targeting and in vitro analysis of pancreatic islets and immune cells, NF-κB activation has been implicated in type 1 diabetes development. Here we use a non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model that expresses a luciferase reporter of transcriptionally active NF-κB to determine its activation in vivo during development of diabetes. Increased luciferase activity was readily detected upon treatment with Toll-like receptor ligands in vitro and in vivo, indicating activation of NF-κB. However, activated NF-κB was detectable at low levels above background in unmanipulated NOD mice, but did not vary with age, despite the progression of inflammatory infiltration in islets over time. NF-κB was highly activated in an accelerated model of type 1 diabetes that requires CD4 T cells and inflammatory macrophages. These data shed light on the nature of the inflammatory response in the development of type 1 diabetes.
1 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
9 MeSH Terms