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Frequent BRAF mutations suggest a novel oncogenic driver in colonic neuroendocrine carcinoma.
Idrees K, Padmanabhan C, Liu E, Guo Y, Gonzalez RS, Berlin J, Dahlman KB, Beauchamp RD, Shi C
(2018) J Surg Oncol 117: 284-289
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Biomarkers, Tumor, Carcinogenesis, Case-Control Studies, Colonic Neoplasms, DNA Mutational Analysis, DNA, Neoplasm, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Mutation, Neuroendocrine Tumors, Prognosis, Proto-Oncogene Proteins B-raf
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES - The World Health Organization (WHO) 2010 has classified GI neuroendocrine neoplasms into neuroendocrine tumor (NET) and high-grade neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC). The genetic underpinnings of NEC are poorly understood. The aim of the study was to perform genomic profiling of NEC to better characterize this aggressive disease.
METHODS - We identified nine patients with colonic NEC between January 1, 2005 and June 30, 2013. Whole exome sequencing (WES) was performed on tumor DNA from two patients with ≥80% tumor cellularity and matched normal tissue available. Focused BRAF mutational analysis was performed on an additional seven patients via sanger sequencing of BRAF exons 11 and 15.
RESULTS - We identified BRAF exon 15 mutations (c.A1781G: p.D594G and c.T1799A: p.V600E) by WES in two patients. Upon additional screening of seven colonic NECs for BRAF exon 11 and 15 mutations, we identified BRAF V600E mutations in two of seven specimens (29%). Overall, BRAF exon 15 mutations were present in four of nine colonic NECs.
CONCLUSION - Colonic NEC is a rare but aggressive tumor with high frequency (44%) of BRAF mutations. Further investigation is warranted to ascertain the incidence of BRAF mutations in a larger population as BRAF inhibition may be a potential avenue of targeted treatment for these patients.
© 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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17 MeSH Terms
RADX Promotes Genome Stability and Modulates Chemosensitivity by Regulating RAD51 at Replication Forks.
Dungrawala H, Bhat KP, Le Meur R, Chazin WJ, Ding X, Sharan SK, Wessel SR, Sathe AA, Zhao R, Cortez D
(2017) Mol Cell 67: 374-386.e5
MeSH Terms: A549 Cells, Animals, BRCA2 Protein, CRISPR-Cas Systems, DNA Breaks, Double-Stranded, DNA Repair, DNA, Neoplasm, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Drug Resistance, Neoplasm, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Genomic Instability, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Mice, Models, Molecular, Mutation, Neoplasms, Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase Inhibitors, Protein Binding, RNA Interference, Rad51 Recombinase, Replication Origin, Transfection
Show Abstract · Added March 24, 2018
RAD51 promotes homology-directed repair (HDR), replication fork reversal, and stalled fork protection. Defects in these functions cause genomic instability and tumorigenesis but also generate hypersensitivity to cancer therapeutics. Here we describe the identification of RADX as an RPA-like, single-strand DNA binding protein. RADX is recruited to replication forks, where it prevents fork collapse by regulating RAD51. When RADX is inactivated, excessive RAD51 activity slows replication elongation and causes double-strand breaks. In cancer cells lacking BRCA2, RADX deletion restores fork protection without restoring HDR. Furthermore, RADX inactivation confers chemotherapy and PARP inhibitor resistance to cancer cells with reduced BRCA2/RAD51 pathway function. By antagonizing RAD51 at forks, RADX allows cells to maintain a high capacity for HDR while ensuring that replication functions of RAD51 are properly regulated. Thus, RADX is essential to achieve the proper balance of RAD51 activity to maintain genome stability.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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23 MeSH Terms
TRIzol and Alu qPCR-based quantification of metastatic seeding within the skeleton.
Preston Campbell J, Mulcrone P, Masood SK, Karolak M, Merkel A, Hebron K, Zijlstra A, Sterling J, Elefteriou F
(2015) Sci Rep 5: 12635
MeSH Terms: Alu Elements, Animals, Biomarkers, Tumor, Bone Neoplasms, Cell Line, Tumor, DNA, Neoplasm, Gene Expression Profiling, Genetic Markers, Guanidines, Mice, Mice, Nude, Phenols, RNA, Neoplasm, Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction, Reproducibility of Results, Sensitivity and Specificity
Show Abstract · Added September 14, 2016
Current methods for detecting disseminated tumor cells in the skeleton are limited by expense and technical complexity. We describe a simple and inexpensive method to quantify, with single cell sensitivity, human metastatic cancer in the mouse skeleton, concurrently with host gene expression, using TRIzol-based DNA/RNA extraction and Alu sequence qPCR amplification. This approach enables precise quantification of tumor cells and corresponding host gene expression during metastatic colonization in xenograft models.
1 Communities
3 Members
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16 MeSH Terms
DNA Methylation Predicts Progression of Human Gastric Lesions.
Schneider BG, Mera R, Piazuelo MB, Bravo JC, Zabaleta J, Delgado AG, Bravo LE, Wilson KT, El-Rifai W, Peek RM, Correa P
(2015) Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 24: 1607-13
MeSH Terms: Adenocarcinoma, Adult, Anti-Bacterial Agents, Biomarkers, Tumor, Chemoprevention, DNA Methylation, DNA, Neoplasm, Disease Progression, Double-Blind Method, Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal, Female, Forecasting, Gastric Mucosa, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Polymerase Chain Reaction, Precancerous Conditions, Stomach Neoplasms
Show Abstract · Added September 28, 2015
BACKGROUND - Development of the intestinal subtype of gastric adenocarcinoma is marked by a progression of histopathologic lesions. Residents of the Andean regions of Colombia are at high risk for gastric cancer.
METHODS - A cohort of 976 Colombian subjects was followed over 16 years examining effects of Helicobacter pylori eradication and treatment with antioxidants on progression of lesions. We performed methylation analysis of DNA from baseline antral biopsies from 104 subjects for whom follow-up data were available for at least 12 years. Methylation was quantitated for AMPH, CDKN2A, CDH1, EN1, EMX1, NKX6-1, PCDH10, RPRM, RSPO2, SORCS3, ZIC1, and ZNF610 genes, using Pyrosequencing.
RESULTS - Levels of DNA methylation were associated with baseline diagnosis for AMPH, EMX1, RPRM, RSPO2, SORCS3, and ZNF610. After adjusting for baseline diagnosis and H. pylori infection, methylation levels of AMPH, PCDH10, RSPO2, and ZNF610 had progression coefficients that increased and P values that decreased over 6, 12, and 16 years. Methylation for SORCS3 was associated with progression at all 3 time points but without the continual strengthening of the effect. Scores for mononuclear leukocytes, polymorphonuclear leukocytes, or intraepithelial lymphocytes were unrelated to progression.
CONCLUSIONS - Methylation levels of AMPH, PCDH10, RSPO2, SORCS3, and ZNF610 predict progression of gastric lesions independent of the effect of duration of H. pylori infection, baseline diagnosis, gender of the patient, or scores for mononuclear leukocytes, polymorphonuclear leukocytes, or intraepithelial lymphocytes.
IMPACT - DNA methylation levels in AMPH, PCDH10, RSPO2, SORCS3, and ZNF610 may contribute to identification of persons with gastric lesions likely to progress.
©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.
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21 MeSH Terms
Longitudinal Study of DNA Methylation of Inflammatory Genes and Cancer Risk.
Joyce BT, Gao T, Liu L, Zheng Y, Liu S, Zhang W, Penedo F, Dai Q, Schwartz J, Baccarelli AA, Hou L
(2015) Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 24: 1531-8
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Biomarkers, Tumor, Carcinogenesis, DNA Methylation, DNA, Neoplasm, Disease-Free Survival, Forecasting, Humans, Incidence, Inflammation, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Middle Aged, Neoplasms, Promoter Regions, Genetic, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors, Survival Rate, United States, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added May 6, 2016
BACKGROUND - Chronic inflammation plays a key role in cancer etiology. DNA methylation modification, one of the epigenetic mechanisms regulating gene expression, is considered a hallmark of cancer. Human and animal models have identified numerous links between DNA methylation and inflammatory biomarkers. Our objective was to prospectively and longitudinally examine associations between methylation of four inflammatory genes and cancer risk.
METHODS - We included 795 Normative Aging Study participants with blood drawn one to four times from 1999 to 2012 (median follow-up, 10.6 years). Promoter DNA methylation of IL6, ICAM-1, IFN, and TLR2 in blood leukocytes was measured using pyrosequencing at multiple CpG sites and averaged by gene for data analysis. We used Cox regression models to examine prospective associations of baseline and time-dependent methylation with cancer risk and compared mean methylation differences over time between cancer cases and cancer-free participants.
RESULTS - Baseline IFN hypermethylation was associated with all-cancer (HR, 1.49; P = 0.04) and prostate cancer incidence (HR, 1.69; P = 0.02). Baseline ICAM-1 and IL6 hypermethylation were associated with prostate cancer incidence (HR, 1.43; P = 0.02; HR, 0.70; P = 0.03, respectively). In our time-dependent analyses, IFN hypermethylation was associated with all-cancer (HR, 1.79; P = 0.007) and prostate cancer (HR, 1.57; P = 0.03) incidence; and ICAM-1 and IL6 hypermethylation were associated with prostate cancer incidence (HR, 1.39; P = 0.02; HR, 0.69; P = 0.03, respectively). We detected significant ICAM-1 hypermethylation in cancer cases (P = 0.0003) 10 to 13 years prediagnosis.
CONCLUSION - Hypermethylation of IFN and ICAM-1 may play important roles in early carcinogenesis, particularly that of prostate cancer.
IMPACT - These methylation changes could inform the development of early detection biomarkers and potential treatments of inflammation-related carcinogenesis.
©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.
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22 MeSH Terms
Liquid biopsies reveal the dynamic nature of resistance mechanisms in solid tumors.
Meador CB, Lovly CM
(2015) Nat Med 21: 663-5
MeSH Terms: Biopsy, DNA, Neoplasm, Drug Resistance, Neoplasm, Genome, Human, Humans, Mutation, Neoplasms
Added January 26, 2016
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7 MeSH Terms
Comprehensive, Integrative Genomic Analysis of Diffuse Lower-Grade Gliomas.
Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network, Brat DJ, Verhaak RG, Aldape KD, Yung WK, Salama SR, Cooper LA, Rheinbay E, Miller CR, Vitucci M, Morozova O, Robertson AG, Noushmehr H, Laird PW, Cherniack AD, Akbani R, Huse JT, Ciriello G, Poisson LM, Barnholtz-Sloan JS, Berger MS, Brennan C, Colen RR, Colman H, Flanders AE, Giannini C, Grifford M, Iavarone A, Jain R, Joseph I, Kim J, Kasaian K, Mikkelsen T, Murray BA, O'Neill BP, Pachter L, Parsons DW, Sougnez C, Sulman EP, Vandenberg SR, Van Meir EG, von Deimling A, Zhang H, Crain D, Lau K, Mallery D, Morris S, Paulauskis J, Penny R, Shelton T, Sherman M, Yena P, Black A, Bowen J, Dicostanzo K, Gastier-Foster J, Leraas KM, Lichtenberg TM, Pierson CR, Ramirez NC, Taylor C, Weaver S, Wise L, Zmuda E, Davidsen T, Demchok JA, Eley G, Ferguson ML, Hutter CM, Mills Shaw KR, Ozenberger BA, Sheth M, Sofia HJ, Tarnuzzer R, Wang Z, Yang L, Zenklusen JC, Ayala B, Baboud J, Chudamani S, Jensen MA, Liu J, Pihl T, Raman R, Wan Y, Wu Y, Ally A, Auman JT, Balasundaram M, Balu S, Baylin SB, Beroukhim R, Bootwalla MS, Bowlby R, Bristow CA, Brooks D, Butterfield Y, Carlsen R, Carter S, Chin L, Chu A, Chuah E, Cibulskis K, Clarke A, Coetzee SG, Dhalla N, Fennell T, Fisher S, Gabriel S, Getz G, Gibbs R, Guin R, Hadjipanayis A, Hayes DN, Hinoue T, Hoadley K, Holt RA, Hoyle AP, Jefferys SR, Jones S, Jones CD, Kucherlapati R, Lai PH, Lander E, Lee S, Lichtenstein L, Ma Y, Maglinte DT, Mahadeshwar HS, Marra MA, Mayo M, Meng S, Meyerson ML, Mieczkowski PA, Moore RA, Mose LE, Mungall AJ, Pantazi A, Parfenov M, Park PJ, Parker JS, Perou CM, Protopopov A, Ren X, Roach J, Sabedot TS, Schein J, Schumacher SE, Seidman JG, Seth S, Shen H, Simons JV, Sipahimalani P, Soloway MG, Song X, Sun H, Tabak B, Tam A, Tan D, Tang J, Thiessen N, Triche T, Van Den Berg DJ, Veluvolu U, Waring S, Weisenberger DJ, Wilkerson MD, Wong T, Wu J, Xi L, Xu AW, Yang L, Zack TI, Zhang J, Aksoy BA, Arachchi H, Benz C, Bernard B, Carlin D, Cho J, DiCara D, Frazer S, Fuller GN, Gao J, Gehlenborg N, Haussler D, Heiman DI, Iype L, Jacobsen A, Ju Z, Katzman S, Kim H, Knijnenburg T, Kreisberg RB, Lawrence MS, Lee W, Leinonen K, Lin P, Ling S, Liu W, Liu Y, Liu Y, Lu Y, Mills G, Ng S, Noble MS, Paull E, Rao A, Reynolds S, Saksena G, Sanborn Z, Sander C, Schultz N, Senbabaoglu Y, Shen R, Shmulevich I, Sinha R, Stuart J, Sumer SO, Sun Y, Tasman N, Taylor BS, Voet D, Weinhold N, Weinstein JN, Yang D, Yoshihara K, Zheng S, Zhang W, Zou L, Abel T, Sadeghi S, Cohen ML, Eschbacher J, Hattab EM, Raghunathan A, Schniederjan MJ, Aziz D, Barnett G, Barrett W, Bigner DD, Boice L, Brewer C, Calatozzolo C, Campos B, Carlotti CG, Chan TA, Cuppini L, Curley E, Cuzzubbo S, Devine K, DiMeco F, Duell R, Elder JB, Fehrenbach A, Finocchiaro G, Friedman W, Fulop J, Gardner J, Hermes B, Herold-Mende C, Jungk C, Kendler A, Lehman NL, Lipp E, Liu O, Mandt R, McGraw M, Mclendon R, McPherson C, Neder L, Nguyen P, Noss A, Nunziata R, Ostrom QT, Palmer C, Perin A, Pollo B, Potapov A, Potapova O, Rathmell WK, Rotin D, Scarpace L, Schilero C, Senecal K, Shimmel K, Shurkhay V, Sifri S, Singh R, Sloan AE, Smolenski K, Staugaitis SM, Steele R, Thorne L, Tirapelli DP, Unterberg A, Vallurupalli M, Wang Y, Warnick R, Williams F, Wolinsky Y, Bell S, Rosenberg M, Stewart C, Huang F, Grimsby JL, Radenbaugh AJ, Zhang J
(2015) N Engl J Med 372: 2481-98
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 1, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 19, Cluster Analysis, DNA, Neoplasm, Female, Genes, p53, Glioblastoma, Glioma, Humans, Kaplan-Meier Estimate, Male, Middle Aged, Mutation, Neoplasm Grading, Proportional Hazards Models, Sequence Analysis, DNA, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added October 17, 2015
BACKGROUND - Diffuse low-grade and intermediate-grade gliomas (which together make up the lower-grade gliomas, World Health Organization grades II and III) have highly variable clinical behavior that is not adequately predicted on the basis of histologic class. Some are indolent; others quickly progress to glioblastoma. The uncertainty is compounded by interobserver variability in histologic diagnosis. Mutations in IDH, TP53, and ATRX and codeletion of chromosome arms 1p and 19q (1p/19q codeletion) have been implicated as clinically relevant markers of lower-grade gliomas.
METHODS - We performed genomewide analyses of 293 lower-grade gliomas from adults, incorporating exome sequence, DNA copy number, DNA methylation, messenger RNA expression, microRNA expression, and targeted protein expression. These data were integrated and tested for correlation with clinical outcomes.
RESULTS - Unsupervised clustering of mutations and data from RNA, DNA-copy-number, and DNA-methylation platforms uncovered concordant classification of three robust, nonoverlapping, prognostically significant subtypes of lower-grade glioma that were captured more accurately by IDH, 1p/19q, and TP53 status than by histologic class. Patients who had lower-grade gliomas with an IDH mutation and 1p/19q codeletion had the most favorable clinical outcomes. Their gliomas harbored mutations in CIC, FUBP1, NOTCH1, and the TERT promoter. Nearly all lower-grade gliomas with IDH mutations and no 1p/19q codeletion had mutations in TP53 (94%) and ATRX inactivation (86%). The large majority of lower-grade gliomas without an IDH mutation had genomic aberrations and clinical behavior strikingly similar to those found in primary glioblastoma.
CONCLUSIONS - The integration of genomewide data from multiple platforms delineated three molecular classes of lower-grade gliomas that were more concordant with IDH, 1p/19q, and TP53 status than with histologic class. Lower-grade gliomas with an IDH mutation either had 1p/19q codeletion or carried a TP53 mutation. Most lower-grade gliomas without an IDH mutation were molecularly and clinically similar to glioblastoma. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health.).
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20 MeSH Terms
Preliminary results from a prospective trial of preoperative combined BRAF and MEK-targeted therapy in advanced BRAF mutation-positive melanoma.
Johnson AS, Crandall H, Dahlman K, Kelley MC
(2015) J Am Coll Surg 220: 581-93.e1
MeSH Terms: Administration, Oral, Adult, Aged, Biomarkers, Tumor, Biopsy, DNA Mutational Analysis, DNA, Neoplasm, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Drug Therapy, Combination, Feasibility Studies, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Imidazoles, MAP Kinase Kinase 1, Male, Melanoma, Middle Aged, Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases, Mutation, Oximes, Preoperative Care, Prospective Studies, Proto-Oncogene Proteins B-raf, Pyridones, Pyrimidinones, Skin Neoplasms, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added February 16, 2016
BACKGROUND - We conducted a prospective trial of BRAF and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) targeted therapy in advanced, operable BRAF mutation-positive melanoma to determine feasibility, tumor response rates, and biomarkers of response and resistance.
STUDY DESIGN - Thirteen patients with locally or regionally advanced BRAF mutation-positive melanoma received dabrafenib 150 mg po bid for 14 days, followed by dabrafenib plus trametinib 2 mg po daily for 14 days before operation. Biopsies and tumor measurements were obtained at baseline and days 14 and 28. Formalin-fixed paraffin embedded specimens were analyzed with hematoxylin and eosin, Ki-67, cleaved caspase-3, CD8, phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and phosphorylated MEK immunostains.
RESULTS - Therapy was tolerated well, with toxicity ≥ grade 3 in 2 of 13 (15%) patients. All 12 patients receiving >14 days of therapy had substantial reduction in tumor volume (65% at day 14 and 78% at day 28) and underwent resection. After 14 days of dabrafenib therapy, there was a marked reduction in viable melanoma cells and a CD8 T-cell--rich infiltrate. Proliferation of the residual melanoma cells was reduced and apoptosis was increased. The cells continued to express phosphorylated ERK and phosphorylated MEK consistent with incomplete mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway inhibition.
CONCLUSIONS - Preoperative targeted therapy of advanced BRAF-mutant melanoma is feasible, well tolerated, induces brisk tumor responses, and facilitates correlative science. A CD8 T-cell-rich infiltrate indicates a potential immune-mediated mechanism of action. Both proliferation and apoptosis were inhibited, but the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway remained activated, suggesting intrinsic resistance in a subset of tumor cells. Additional investigation of the anti-tumor immune response during targeted therapy and the mechanisms of intrinsic resistance can yield novel therapeutic strategies.
Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.
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28 MeSH Terms
Comprehensive genomic characterization of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.
Cancer Genome Atlas Network
(2015) Nature 517: 576-82
MeSH Terms: Carcinoma, Squamous Cell, DNA Copy Number Variations, DNA, Neoplasm, Female, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Genome, Human, Genomics, Head and Neck Neoplasms, Humans, Male, Molecular Targeted Therapy, Mutation, Oncogenes, RNA, Neoplasm, Signal Transduction, Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Head and Neck, Transcription Factors
Show Abstract · Added August 8, 2016
The Cancer Genome Atlas profiled 279 head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) to provide a comprehensive landscape of somatic genomic alterations. Here we show that human-papillomavirus-associated tumours are dominated by helical domain mutations of the oncogene PIK3CA, novel alterations involving loss of TRAF3, and amplification of the cell cycle gene E2F1. Smoking-related HNSCCs demonstrate near universal loss-of-function TP53 mutations and CDKN2A inactivation with frequent copy number alterations including amplification of 3q26/28 and 11q13/22. A subgroup of oral cavity tumours with favourable clinical outcomes displayed infrequent copy number alterations in conjunction with activating mutations of HRAS or PIK3CA, coupled with inactivating mutations of CASP8, NOTCH1 and TP53. Other distinct subgroups contained loss-of-function alterations of the chromatin modifier NSD1, WNT pathway genes AJUBA and FAT1, and activation of oxidative stress factor NFE2L2, mainly in laryngeal tumours. Therapeutic candidate alterations were identified in most HNSCCs.
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17 MeSH Terms
Loss of heterozygosity at the CYP2D6 locus in breast cancer: implications for germline pharmacogenetic studies.
Goetz MP, Sun JX, Suman VJ, Silva GO, Perou CM, Nakamura Y, Cox NJ, Stephens PJ, Miller VA, Ross JS, Chen D, Safgren SL, Kuffel MJ, Ames MM, Kalari KR, Gomez HL, Gonzalez-Angulo AM, Burgues O, Brauch HB, Ingle JN, Ratain MJ, Yelensky R
(2014) J Natl Cancer Inst 107:
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal, Biomarkers, Tumor, Breast Neoplasms, Cytochrome P-450 CYP2D6, DNA, Neoplasm, Disease-Free Survival, Female, Formaldehyde, Genotype, Humans, Loss of Heterozygosity, Middle Aged, Mouth Mucosa, Paraffin Embedding, Receptor, ErbB-2, Receptors, Estrogen, Survival Analysis, Tamoxifen, Tissue Fixation
Show Abstract · Added February 22, 2016
BACKGROUND - Controversy exists regarding the impact of CYP2D6 genotype on tamoxifen responsiveness. We examined loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at the CYP2D6 locus and determined its impact on genotyping error when tumor tissue is used as a DNA source.
METHODS - Genomic tumor data from the adjuvant and metastatic settings (The Cancer Genome Atlas [TCGA] and Foundation Medicine [FM]) were analyzed to characterize the impact of CYP2D6 copy number alterations (CNAs) and LOH on Hardy Weinberg equilibrium (HWE). Additionally, we analyzed CYP2D6 *4 genotype from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumor blocks containing nonmalignant tissue and buccal (germline) samples from patients on the North Central Cancer Treatment Group (NCCTG) 89-30-52 tamoxifen trial. All statistical tests were two-sided.
RESULTS - In TCGA samples (n =627), the CYP2D6 LOH rate was similar in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive (41.2%) and ER-negative (35.2%) but lower in HER2-positive tumors (15.1%) (P < .001). In FM ER+ samples (n = 290), similar LOH rates were observed (40.8%). In 190 NCCTG samples, the agreement between CYP2D6 genotypes derived from FFPE tumors and FFPE tumors containing nonmalignant tissue was moderate (weighted Kappa = 0.74; 95% CI = 0.63 to 0.84). Comparing CYP2D6 genotypes derived from buccal cells to FFPE tumor DNA, CYP2D6*4 genotype was discordant in six of 31(19.4%). In contrast, there was no disagreement between CYP2D6 genotypes derived from buccal cells with FFPE tumors containing nonmalignant tissue.
CONCLUSIONS - LOH at the CYP2D6 locus is common in breast cancer, resulting in potential misclassification of germline CYP2D6 genotypes. Tumor DNA should not be used to determine germline CYP2D6 genotype without sensitive techniques to detect low frequency alleles and quality control procedures appropriate for somatic DNA.
© The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
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21 MeSH Terms