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Movement of the RecG Motor Domain upon DNA Binding Is Required for Efficient Fork Reversal.
Warren GM, Stein RA, Mchaourab HS, Eichman BF
(2018) Int J Mol Sci 19:
MeSH Terms: DNA, DNA Helicases, DNA Replication, DNA-Binding Proteins, Models, Molecular, Molecular Conformation, Mutation, Nucleic Acid Conformation, Protein Binding, Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs, Structure-Activity Relationship
Show Abstract · Added August 26, 2019
RecG catalyzes reversal of stalled replication forks in response to replication stress in bacteria. The protein contains a fork recognition ("wedge") domain that binds branched DNA and a superfamily II (SF2) ATPase motor that drives translocation on double-stranded (ds)DNA. The mechanism by which the wedge and motor domains collaborate to catalyze fork reversal in RecG and analogous eukaryotic fork remodelers is unknown. Here, we used electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to probe conformational changes between the wedge and ATPase domains in response to fork DNA binding by RecG. Upon binding DNA, the ATPase-C lobe moves away from both the wedge and ATPase-N domains. This conformational change is consistent with a model of RecG fully engaged with a DNA fork substrate constructed from a crystal structure of RecG bound to a DNA junction together with recent cryo-electron microscopy (EM) structures of chromatin remodelers in complex with dsDNA. We show by mutational analysis that a conserved loop within the translocation in RecG (TRG) motif that was unstructured in the RecG crystal structure is essential for fork reversal and DNA-dependent conformational changes. Together, this work helps provide a more coherent model of fork binding and remodeling by RecG and related eukaryotic enzymes.
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The HIRAN domain of helicase-like transcription factor positions the DNA translocase motor to drive efficient DNA fork regression.
Chavez DA, Greer BH, Eichman BF
(2018) J Biol Chem 293: 8484-8494
MeSH Terms: DNA Helicases, DNA Replication, DNA, Single-Stranded, DNA-Binding Proteins, Humans, Protein Domains, Transcription Factors
Show Abstract · Added August 26, 2019
Helicase-like transcription factor (HLTF) is a central mediator of the DNA damage response and maintains genome stability by regressing stalled replication forks. The N-terminal HIRAN domain binds specifically to the 3'-end of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), and disrupting this function interferes with fork regression as well as replication fork progression in cells under replication stress. Here, we investigated the mechanism by which the HIRAN-ssDNA interaction facilitates fork remodeling. Our results indicated that HIRAN capture of a denatured nascent leading 3'-end directs specific binding of HLTF to forks. DNase footprinting revealed that HLTF binds to the parental duplex ahead of the fork and at the leading edge behind the fork. Moreover, we found that the HIRAN domain is important for initiating regression of forks when both nascent strands are at the junction, but is dispensable when forks contain ssDNA regions on either template strand. We also found that HLTF catalyzes fork restoration from a partially regressed structure in a HIRAN-dependent manner. Thus, HIRAN serves as a substrate-recognition domain to properly orient the ATPase motor domain at stalled and regressed forks and initiates fork remodeling by guiding formation of a four-way junction. We discuss how these activities compare with those of two related fork remodelers, SWI/SNF-related, matrix-associated, actin-dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily A-like 1 (SMARCAL1) and zinc finger RANBP2 type-containing 3 (ZRANB3) to provide insight into their nonredundant roles in DNA damage tolerance.
© 2018 Chavez et al.
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Three-dimensional spatial analysis of missense variants in RTEL1 identifies pathogenic variants in patients with Familial Interstitial Pneumonia.
Sivley RM, Sheehan JH, Kropski JA, Cogan J, Blackwell TS, Phillips JA, Bush WS, Meiler J, Capra JA
(2018) BMC Bioinformatics 19: 18
MeSH Terms: Algorithms, Area Under Curve, DNA Helicases, Humans, Lung Diseases, Interstitial, Mutation, Missense, Protein Structure, Tertiary, ROC Curve, Spatial Analysis
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
BACKGROUND - Next-generation sequencing of individuals with genetic diseases often detects candidate rare variants in numerous genes, but determining which are causal remains challenging. We hypothesized that the spatial distribution of missense variants in protein structures contains information about function and pathogenicity that can help prioritize variants of unknown significance (VUS) and elucidate the structural mechanisms leading to disease.
RESULTS - To illustrate this approach in a clinical application, we analyzed 13 candidate missense variants in regulator of telomere elongation helicase 1 (RTEL1) identified in patients with Familial Interstitial Pneumonia (FIP). We curated pathogenic and neutral RTEL1 variants from the literature and public databases. We then used homology modeling to construct a 3D structural model of RTEL1 and mapped known variants into this structure. We next developed a pathogenicity prediction algorithm based on proximity to known disease causing and neutral variants and evaluated its performance with leave-one-out cross-validation. We further validated our predictions with segregation analyses, telomere lengths, and mutagenesis data from the homologous XPD protein. Our algorithm for classifying RTEL1 VUS based on spatial proximity to pathogenic and neutral variation accurately distinguished 7 known pathogenic from 29 neutral variants (ROC AUC = 0.85) in the N-terminal domains of RTEL1. Pathogenic proximity scores were also significantly correlated with effects on ATPase activity (Pearson r = -0.65, p = 0.0004) in XPD, a related helicase. Applying the algorithm to 13 VUS identified from sequencing of RTEL1 from patients predicted five out of six disease-segregating VUS to be pathogenic. We provide structural hypotheses regarding how these mutations may disrupt RTEL1 ATPase and helicase function.
CONCLUSIONS - Spatial analysis of missense variation accurately classified candidate VUS in RTEL1 and suggests how such variants cause disease. Incorporating spatial proximity analyses into other pathogenicity prediction tools may improve accuracy for other genes and genetic diseases.
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9 MeSH Terms
Mms1 binds to G-rich regions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and influences replication and genome stability.
Wanzek K, Schwindt E, Capra JA, Paeschke K
(2017) Nucleic Acids Res 45: 7796-7806
MeSH Terms: Binding Sites, Cell Cycle, Cullin Proteins, DNA Helicases, DNA Replication, DNA, Fungal, Endodeoxyribonucleases, Exodeoxyribonucleases, G-Quadruplexes, GC Rich Sequence, Genomic Instability, Models, Biological, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
The regulation of replication is essential to preserve genome integrity. Mms1 is part of the E3 ubiquitin ligase complex that is linked to replication fork progression. By identifying Mms1 binding sites genome-wide in Saccharomyces cerevisiae we connected Mms1 function to genome integrity and replication fork progression at particular G-rich motifs. This motif can form G-quadruplex (G4) structures in vitro. G4 are stable DNA structures that are known to impede replication fork progression. In the absence of Mms1, genome stability is at risk at these G-rich/G4 regions as demonstrated by gross chromosomal rearrangement assays. Mms1 binds throughout the cell cycle to these G-rich/G4 regions and supports the binding of Pif1 DNA helicase. Based on these data we propose a mechanistic model in which Mms1 binds to specific G-rich/G4 motif located on the lagging strand template for DNA replication and supports Pif1 function, DNA replication and genome integrity.
© The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.
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14 MeSH Terms
Pfh1 Is an Accessory Replicative Helicase that Interacts with the Replisome to Facilitate Fork Progression and Preserve Genome Integrity.
McDonald KR, Guise AJ, Pourbozorgi-Langroudi P, Cristea IM, Zakian VA, Capra JA, Sabouri N
(2016) PLoS Genet 12: e1006238
MeSH Terms: Binding Sites, DNA Helicases, DNA Replication, DNA-Directed DNA Polymerase, Genomic Instability, Multienzyme Complexes, Protein Binding, S Phase, Schizosaccharomyces, Schizosaccharomyces pombe Proteins
Show Abstract · Added April 18, 2017
Replicative DNA helicases expose the two strands of the double helix to the replication apparatus, but accessory helicases are often needed to help forks move past naturally occurring hard-to-replicate sites, such as tightly bound proteins, RNA/DNA hybrids, and DNA secondary structures. Although the Schizosaccharomyces pombe 5'-to-3' DNA helicase Pfh1 is known to promote fork progression, its genomic targets, dynamics, and mechanisms of action are largely unknown. Here we address these questions by integrating genome-wide identification of Pfh1 binding sites, comprehensive analysis of the effects of Pfh1 depletion on replication and DNA damage, and proteomic analysis of Pfh1 interaction partners by immunoaffinity purification mass spectrometry. Of the 621 high confidence Pfh1-binding sites in wild type cells, about 40% were sites of fork slowing (as marked by high DNA polymerase occupancy) and/or DNA damage (as marked by high levels of phosphorylated H2A). The replication and integrity of tRNA and 5S rRNA genes, highly transcribed RNA polymerase II genes, and nucleosome depleted regions were particularly Pfh1-dependent. The association of Pfh1 with genomic integrity at highly transcribed genes was S phase dependent, and thus unlikely to be an artifact of high transcription rates. Although Pfh1 affected replication and suppressed DNA damage at discrete sites throughout the genome, Pfh1 and the replicative DNA polymerase bound to similar extents to both Pfh1-dependent and independent sites, suggesting that Pfh1 is proximal to the replication machinery during S phase. Consistent with this interpretation, Pfh1 co-purified with many key replisome components, including the hexameric MCM helicase, replicative DNA polymerases, RPA, and the processivity clamp PCNA in an S phase dependent manner. Thus, we conclude that Pfh1 is an accessory DNA helicase that interacts with the replisome and promotes replication and suppresses DNA damage at hard-to-replicate sites. These data provide insight into mechanisms by which this evolutionarily conserved helicase helps preserve genome integrity.
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10 MeSH Terms
Identification of a Substrate Recognition Domain in the Replication Stress Response Protein Zinc Finger Ran-binding Domain-containing Protein 3 (ZRANB3).
Badu-Nkansah A, Mason AC, Eichman BF, Cortez D
(2016) J Biol Chem 291: 8251-7
MeSH Terms: Adenosine Triphosphate, Amino Acid Sequence, Animals, DNA, DNA Damage, DNA Helicases, DNA Repair, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Mice, Molecular Sequence Data, Protein Structure, Tertiary, Sequence Alignment
Show Abstract · Added April 7, 2017
DNA damage and other forms of replication stress can cause replication forks to stall. Replication stress response proteins stabilize and resolve stalled forks by mechanisms that include fork remodeling to facilitate repair or bypass of damaged templates. Several enzymes including SMARCAL1, HLTF, and ZRANB3 catalyze these reactions. SMARCAL1 and HLTF utilize structurally distinct accessory domains attached to an ATPase motor domain to facilitate DNA binding and catalysis of fork remodeling reactions. Here we describe a substrate recognition domain within ZRANB3 that is needed for it to recognize forked DNA structures, hydrolyze ATP, catalyze fork remodeling, and act as a structure-specific endonuclease. Thus, substrate recognition domains are a common feature of fork remodeling, SNF2-family, DNA-dependent ATPases, and our study provides further mechanistic understanding of how these enzymes maintain genome integrity during DNA replication.
© 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.
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13 MeSH Terms
Molecular Profiling Reveals Biologically Discrete Subsets and Pathways of Progression in Diffuse Glioma.
Ceccarelli M, Barthel FP, Malta TM, Sabedot TS, Salama SR, Murray BA, Morozova O, Newton Y, Radenbaugh A, Pagnotta SM, Anjum S, Wang J, Manyam G, Zoppoli P, Ling S, Rao AA, Grifford M, Cherniack AD, Zhang H, Poisson L, Carlotti CG, Tirapelli DP, Rao A, Mikkelsen T, Lau CC, Yung WK, Rabadan R, Huse J, Brat DJ, Lehman NL, Barnholtz-Sloan JS, Zheng S, Hess K, Rao G, Meyerson M, Beroukhim R, Cooper L, Akbani R, Wrensch M, Haussler D, Aldape KD, Laird PW, Gutmann DH, TCGA Research Network, Noushmehr H, Iavarone A, Verhaak RG
(2016) Cell 164: 550-63
MeSH Terms: Adult, Brain Neoplasms, Cell Proliferation, Cluster Analysis, DNA Helicases, DNA Methylation, Epigenesis, Genetic, Glioma, Humans, Isocitrate Dehydrogenase, Middle Aged, Mutation, Nuclear Proteins, Promoter Regions, Genetic, Signal Transduction, Telomerase, Telomere, Transcriptome, X-linked Nuclear Protein
Show Abstract · Added August 8, 2016
Therapy development for adult diffuse glioma is hindered by incomplete knowledge of somatic glioma driving alterations and suboptimal disease classification. We defined the complete set of genes associated with 1,122 diffuse grade II-III-IV gliomas from The Cancer Genome Atlas and used molecular profiles to improve disease classification, identify molecular correlations, and provide insights into the progression from low- to high-grade disease. Whole-genome sequencing data analysis determined that ATRX but not TERT promoter mutations are associated with increased telomere length. Recent advances in glioma classification based on IDH mutation and 1p/19q co-deletion status were recapitulated through analysis of DNA methylation profiles, which identified clinically relevant molecular subsets. A subtype of IDH mutant glioma was associated with DNA demethylation and poor outcome; a group of IDH-wild-type diffuse glioma showed molecular similarity to pilocytic astrocytoma and relatively favorable survival. Understanding of cohesive disease groups may aid improved clinical outcomes.
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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19 MeSH Terms
SMARCAL1 maintains telomere integrity during DNA replication.
Poole LA, Zhao R, Glick GG, Lovejoy CA, Eischen CM, Cortez D
(2015) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 112: 14864-9
MeSH Terms: Animals, Chromosomes, Human, DNA Damage, DNA Helicases, DNA Replication, HeLa Cells, Humans, Mice, Recombination, Genetic, Telomere, Telomere Homeostasis
Show Abstract · Added February 4, 2016
The SMARCAL1 (SWI/SNF related, matrix-associated, actin-dependent, regulator of chromatin, subfamily A-like 1) DNA translocase is one of several related enzymes, including ZRANB3 (zinc finger, RAN-binding domain containing 3) and HLTF (helicase-like transcription factor), that are recruited to stalled replication forks to promote repair and restart replication. These enzymes can perform similar biochemical reactions such as fork reversal; however, genetic studies indicate they must have unique cellular activities. Here, we present data showing that SMARCAL1 has an important function at telomeres, which present an endogenous source of replication stress. SMARCAL1-deficient cells accumulate telomere-associated DNA damage and have greatly elevated levels of extrachromosomal telomere DNA (C-circles). Although these telomere phenotypes are often found in tumor cells using the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) pathway for telomere elongation, SMARCAL1 deficiency does not yield other ALT phenotypes such as elevated telomere recombination. The activity of SMARCAL1 at telomeres can be separated from its genome-maintenance activity in bulk chromosomal replication because it does not require interaction with replication protein A. Finally, this telomere-maintenance function is not shared by ZRANB3 or HLTF. Our results provide the first identification, to our knowledge, of an endogenous source of replication stress that requires SMARCAL1 for resolution and define differences between members of this class of replication fork-repair enzymes.
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11 MeSH Terms
The Replication Checkpoint Prevents Two Types of Fork Collapse without Regulating Replisome Stability.
Dungrawala H, Rose KL, Bhat KP, Mohni KN, Glick GG, Couch FB, Cortez D
(2015) Mol Cell 59: 998-1010
MeSH Terms: Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated Proteins, Cell Line, Tumor, DNA Damage, DNA Helicases, DNA Repair Enzymes, DNA Replication, DNA-Directed DNA Polymerase, Deoxyribonucleases, Enzyme Stability, HEK293 Cells, Humans, S Phase Cell Cycle Checkpoints, Transcription Factors
Show Abstract · Added February 4, 2016
The ATR replication checkpoint ensures that stalled forks remain stable when replisome movement is impeded. Using an improved iPOND protocol combined with SILAC mass spectrometry, we characterized human replisome dynamics in response to fork stalling. Our data provide a quantitative picture of the replisome and replication stress response proteomes in 32 experimental conditions. Importantly, rather than stabilize the replisome, the checkpoint prevents two distinct types of fork collapse. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of protein abundance on nascent DNA is sufficient to identify protein complexes and place newly identified replisome-associated proteins into functional pathways. As an example, we demonstrate that ZNF644 complexes with the G9a/GLP methyltransferase at replication forks and is needed to prevent replication-associated DNA damage. Our data reveal how the replication checkpoint preserves genome integrity, provide insights into the mechanism of action of ATR inhibitors, and will be a useful resource for replication, DNA repair, and chromatin investigators.
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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13 MeSH Terms
A novel splice site mutation in SMARCAL1 results in aberrant exon definition in a child with Schimke immunoosseous dysplasia.
Carroll C, Hunley TE, Guo Y, Cortez D
(2015) Am J Med Genet A 167A: 2260-4
MeSH Terms: Arteriosclerosis, Child, DNA Helicases, DNA Replication, Exons, Female, Gene Expression, High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing, Humans, Immunologic Deficiency Syndromes, Introns, Lymphocytes, Mutation, Nephrotic Syndrome, Osteochondrodysplasias, Pedigree, Pulmonary Embolism, RNA Splice Sites
Show Abstract · Added February 4, 2016
Schimke Immunoosseous Dysplasia (SIOD) is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder of childhood characterized by spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and renal failure, T-cell immunodeficiency, and cancer in certain instances. Approximately half of patients with SIOD are reported to have biallelic mutations in SMARCAL1 (SWI/SNF-related matrix-associated actin-dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily a-like 1), which encodes a DNA translocase that localizes to sites of DNA replication and repairs damaged replication forks. We present a novel mutation (NM_014140.3:c.2070+2insT) that results in defective SMARCAL1 mRNA splicing in a child with SIOD. This mutation, within the donor site of intron 12, results in the skipping of exon 12, which encodes part of a critical hinge region connecting the two lobes of the ATPase domain. This mutation was not recognized as deleterious by diagnostic SMARCAL1 sequencing, but discovered through next generation sequencing and found to result in absent SMARCAL1 expression in patient-derived lymphoblasts. The splicing defect caused by this mutation supports the concept of exon definition. Furthermore, it illustrates the need to broaden the search for SMARCAL1 mutations in patients with SIOD lacking coding sequence variants.
© 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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18 MeSH Terms