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Bcl2-Expressing Quiescent Type B Neural Stem Cells in the Ventricular-Subventricular Zone Are Resistant to Concurrent Temozolomide/X-Irradiation.
Cameron BD, Traver G, Roland JT, Brockman AA, Dean D, Johnson L, Boyd K, Ihrie RA, Freeman ML
(2019) Stem Cells 37: 1629-1639
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating, Apoptosis, Chemoradiotherapy, DNA Breaks, Double-Stranded, DNA Repair, Disease Models, Animal, Drug Resistance, Female, Glioblastoma, Lateral Ventricles, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Neural Stem Cells, Neurogenesis, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2, Temozolomide, X-Ray Therapy
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
The ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ) of the mammalian brain is a site of adult neurogenesis. Within the V-SVZ reside type B neural stem cells (NSCs) and type A neuroblasts. The V-SVZ is also a primary site for very aggressive glioblastoma (GBM). Standard-of-care therapy for GBM consists of safe maximum resection, concurrent temozolomide (TMZ), and X-irradiation (XRT), followed by adjuvant TMZ therapy. The question of how this therapy impacts neurogenesis is not well understood and is of fundamental importance as normal tissue tolerance is a limiting factor. Here, we studied the effects of concurrent TMZ/XRT followed by adjuvant TMZ on type B stem cells and type A neuroblasts of the V-SVZ in C57BL/6 mice. We found that chemoradiation induced an apoptotic response in type A neuroblasts, as marked by cleavage of caspase 3, but not in NSCs, and that A cells within the V-SVZ were repopulated given sufficient recovery time. 53BP1 foci formation and resolution was used to assess the repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Remarkably, the repair was the same in type B and type A cells. While Bax expression was the same for type A or B cells, antiapoptotic Bcl2 and Mcl1 expression was significantly greater in NSCs. Thus, the resistance of type B NSCs to TMZ/XRT appears to be due, in part, to high basal expression of antiapoptotic proteins compared with type A cells. This preclinical research, demonstrating that murine NSCs residing in the V-SVZ are tolerant of standard chemoradiation therapy, supports a dose escalation strategy for treatment of GBM. Stem Cells 2019;37:1629-1639.
© 2019 The Authors. Stem Cells published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press 2019.
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19 MeSH Terms
RADX Promotes Genome Stability and Modulates Chemosensitivity by Regulating RAD51 at Replication Forks.
Dungrawala H, Bhat KP, Le Meur R, Chazin WJ, Ding X, Sharan SK, Wessel SR, Sathe AA, Zhao R, Cortez D
(2017) Mol Cell 67: 374-386.e5
MeSH Terms: A549 Cells, Animals, BRCA2 Protein, CRISPR-Cas Systems, DNA Breaks, Double-Stranded, DNA Repair, DNA, Neoplasm, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Drug Resistance, Neoplasm, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Genomic Instability, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Mice, Models, Molecular, Mutation, Neoplasms, Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase Inhibitors, Protein Binding, RNA Interference, Rad51 Recombinase, Replication Origin, Transfection
Show Abstract · Added March 24, 2018
RAD51 promotes homology-directed repair (HDR), replication fork reversal, and stalled fork protection. Defects in these functions cause genomic instability and tumorigenesis but also generate hypersensitivity to cancer therapeutics. Here we describe the identification of RADX as an RPA-like, single-strand DNA binding protein. RADX is recruited to replication forks, where it prevents fork collapse by regulating RAD51. When RADX is inactivated, excessive RAD51 activity slows replication elongation and causes double-strand breaks. In cancer cells lacking BRCA2, RADX deletion restores fork protection without restoring HDR. Furthermore, RADX inactivation confers chemotherapy and PARP inhibitor resistance to cancer cells with reduced BRCA2/RAD51 pathway function. By antagonizing RAD51 at forks, RADX allows cells to maintain a high capacity for HDR while ensuring that replication functions of RAD51 are properly regulated. Thus, RADX is essential to achieve the proper balance of RAD51 activity to maintain genome stability.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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23 MeSH Terms
Interleukin-22 drives nitric oxide-dependent DNA damage and dysplasia in a murine model of colitis-associated cancer.
Wang C, Gong G, Sheh A, Muthupalani S, Bryant EM, Puglisi DA, Holcombe H, Conaway EA, Parry NAP, Bakthavatchalu V, Short SP, Williams CS, Wogan GN, Tannenbaum SR, Fox JG, Horwitz BH
(2017) Mucosal Immunol 10: 1504-1517
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antibodies, Blocking, Colitis, Ulcerative, Colon, Colonic Neoplasms, DNA Breaks, Double-Stranded, DNA-Binding Proteins, Disease Models, Animal, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter hepaticus, Humans, Inflammation, Interleukins, Macrophages, Peritoneal, Mice, Mice, 129 Strain, Mice, Knockout, Neoplasms, Nitric Oxide, Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II
Show Abstract · Added April 15, 2019
The risk of colon cancer is increased in patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Inflammation-induced DNA damage could be an important link between inflammation and cancer, although the pathways that link inflammation and DNA damage are incompletely defined. RAG2-deficient mice infected with Helicobacter hepaticus (Hh) develop colitis that progresses to lower bowel cancer. This process depends on nitric oxide (NO), a molecule with known mutagenic potential. We have previously hypothesized that production of NO by macrophages could be essential for Hh-driven carcinogenesis, however, whether Hh infection induces DNA damage in this model and whether this depends on NO has not been determined. Here we demonstrate that Hh infection of RAG2-deficient mice rapidly induces expression of iNOS and the development of DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs) specifically in proliferating crypt epithelial cells. Generation of DSBs depended on iNOS activity, and further, induction of iNOS, the generation of DSBs, and the subsequent development of dysplasia were inhibited by depletion of the Hh-induced cytokine IL-22. These results demonstrate a strong association between Hh-induced DNA damage and the development of dysplasia, and further suggest that IL-22-dependent induction of iNOS within crypt epithelial cells rather than macrophages is a driving force in this process.
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MeSH Terms
Endogenous Hot Spots of De Novo Telomere Addition in the Yeast Genome Contain Proximal Enhancers That Bind Cdc13.
Obodo UC, Epum EA, Platts MH, Seloff J, Dahlson NA, Velkovsky SM, Paul SR, Friedman KL
(2016) Mol Cell Biol 36: 1750-63
MeSH Terms: Binding Sites, DNA Breaks, Double-Stranded, DNA Repair, DNA, Fungal, Enhancer Elements, Genetic, Genome, Fungal, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins, Telomerase, Telomere, Telomere-Binding Proteins
Show Abstract · Added April 8, 2019
DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) pose a threat to genome stability and are repaired through multiple mechanisms. Rarely, telomerase, the enzyme that maintains telomeres, acts upon a DSB in a mutagenic process termed telomere healing. The probability of telomere addition is increased at specific genomic sequences termed sites of repair-associated telomere addition (SiRTAs). By monitoring repair of an induced DSB, we show that SiRTAs on chromosomes V and IX share a bipartite structure in which a core sequence (Core) is directly targeted by telomerase, while a proximal sequence (Stim) enhances the probability of de novo telomere formation. The Stim and Core sequences are sufficient to confer a high frequency of telomere addition to an ectopic site. Cdc13, a single-stranded DNA binding protein that recruits telomerase to endogenous telomeres, is known to stimulate de novo telomere addition when artificially recruited to an induced DSB. Here we show that the ability of the Stim sequence to enhance de novo telomere addition correlates with its ability to bind Cdc13, indicating that natural sites at which telomere addition occurs at high frequency require binding by Cdc13 to a sequence 20 to 100 bp internal from the site at which telomerase acts to initiate de novo telomere addition.
Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.
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MeSH Terms
The nucleoid-associated protein HU enhances 8-oxoguanine base excision by the formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase.
Le Meur R, Culard F, Nadan V, Goffinont S, Coste F, Guerin M, Loth K, Landon C, Castaing B
(2015) Biochem J 471: 13-23
MeSH Terms: DNA Breaks, Double-Stranded, DNA Repair, DNA, Bacterial, DNA-Binding Proteins, DNA-Formamidopyrimidine Glycosylase, Escherichia coli, Escherichia coli Proteins, Guanine
Show Abstract · Added January 11, 2016
The nucleoid-associated protein HU is involved in numerous DNA transactions and thus is essential in DNA maintenance and bacterial survival. The high affinity of HU for SSBs (single-strand breaks) has suggested its involvement in DNA protection, repair and recombination. SSB-containing DNA are major intermediates transiently generated by bifunctional DNA N-glycosylases that initiate the BER (base excision repair) pathway. Enzyme kinetics and DNA-binding experiments demonstrate that HU enhances the 8-oxoguanine-DNA glycosylase activity of Fpg (formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase) by facilitating the release of the enzyme from its final DNA product (one nucleoside gap). We propose that the displacement of Fpg from its end-DNA product by HU is an active mechanism in which HU recognizes the product when it is still bound by Fpg. Through DNA binding, the two proteins interplay to form a transient ternary complex Fpg/DNA/HU which results in the release of Fpg and the molecular entrapment of SSBs by HU. These results support the involvement of HU in BER in vivo.
© 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.
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8 MeSH Terms
Pharmacologically Increasing Mdm2 Inhibits DNA Repair and Cooperates with Genotoxic Agents to Kill p53-Inactivated Ovarian Cancer Cells.
Carrillo AM, Hicks M, Khabele D, Eischen CM
(2015) Mol Cancer Res 13: 1197-205
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols, Apoptosis, Cell Line, Tumor, Cell Proliferation, Cisplatin, Comet Assay, DNA Breaks, Double-Stranded, DNA Damage, DNA Repair, Etoposide, Female, Fibroblasts, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Imidazoles, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, Mutagens, Ovarian Neoplasms, Piperazines, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-mdm2, Tumor Suppressor Protein p53
Show Abstract · Added February 22, 2016
UNLABELLED - The Mdm2 oncogene is a negative regulator of the p53 tumor suppressor and recently identified inhibitor of DNA break repair. Nutlin-3 is a small-molecule inhibitor of Mdm2-p53 interaction that can induce apoptosis in cancer cells through activation of p53. Although this is a promising therapy for those cancers with wild-type p53, half of all human cancers have inactivated p53. Here, we reveal that a previously unappreciated effect of Nutlin is inhibition of DNA break repair, stemming from its ability to increase Mdm2 protein levels. The Nutlin-induced increase in Mdm2 inhibited DNA double-strand break repair and prolonged DNA damage response signaling independent of p53. Mechanistically, this effect of Nutlin required Mdm2 and acted through Nbs1 of the Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 DNA repair complex. In ovarian cancer cells, where >90% have inactivated p53, Nutlin combined with the genotoxic agents, cisplatin or etoposide, had a cooperative lethal effect resulting in increased DNA damage and apoptosis. Therefore, these data demonstrate an unexpected consequence of pharmacologically increasing Mdm2 levels that when used in combination with genotoxic agents induces synthetic lethality in ovarian cancer cells, and likely other malignant cell types, that have inactivated p53.
IMPLICATIONS - Data reveal a therapeutically beneficial effect of pharmacologically increasing Mdm2 levels combined with chemotherapeutic agents for malignancies that have lost functional p53.
©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.
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23 MeSH Terms
SV40 utilizes ATM kinase activity to prevent non-homologous end joining of broken viral DNA replication products.
Sowd GA, Mody D, Eggold J, Cortez D, Friedman KL, Fanning E
(2014) PLoS Pathog 10: e1004536
MeSH Terms: Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated Proteins, Cell Line, DNA Breaks, Double-Stranded, DNA End-Joining Repair, DNA Replication, DNA, Viral, Humans, Simian virus 40, Virus Replication
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
Simian virus 40 (SV40) and cellular DNA replication rely on host ATM and ATR DNA damage signaling kinases to facilitate DNA repair and elicit cell cycle arrest following DNA damage. During SV40 DNA replication, ATM kinase activity prevents concatemerization of the viral genome whereas ATR activity prevents accumulation of aberrant genomes resulting from breakage of a moving replication fork as it converges with a stalled fork. However, the repair pathways that ATM and ATR orchestrate to prevent these aberrant SV40 DNA replication products are unclear. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and Southern blotting, we show that ATR kinase activity, but not DNA-PK(cs) kinase activity, facilitates some aspects of double strand break (DSB) repair when ATM is inhibited during SV40 infection. To clarify which repair factors associate with viral DNA replication centers, we examined the localization of DSB repair proteins in response to SV40 infection. Under normal conditions, viral replication centers exclusively associate with homology-directed repair (HDR) and do not colocalize with non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) factors. Following ATM inhibition, but not ATR inhibition, activated DNA-PK(cs) and KU70/80 accumulate at the viral replication centers while CtIP and BLM, proteins that initiate 5' to 3' end resection during HDR, become undetectable. Similar to what has been observed during cellular DSB repair in S phase, these data suggest that ATM kinase influences DSB repair pathway choice by preventing the recruitment of NHEJ factors to replicating viral DNA. These data may explain how ATM prevents concatemerization of the viral genome and promotes viral propagation. We suggest that inhibitors of DNA damage signaling and DNA repair could be used during infection to disrupt productive viral DNA replication.
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9 MeSH Terms
Targeting nucleophosmin 1 represents a rational strategy for radiation sensitization.
Sekhar KR, Benamar M, Venkateswaran A, Sasi S, Penthala NR, Crooks PA, Hann SR, Geng L, Balusu R, Abbas T, Freeman ML
(2014) Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 89: 1106-1114
MeSH Terms: Animals, Barbiturates, Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung, DNA Breaks, Double-Stranded, DNA Repair, Fibroblasts, Histones, Humans, Indoles, Lung Neoplasms, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Nude, Molecular Targeted Therapy, Neoplasm Proteins, Nuclear Proteins, Rad51 Recombinase, Radiation Tolerance, Radiation-Sensitizing Agents, Tissue Array Analysis, Tumor Cells, Cultured
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
PURPOSE - To test the hypothesis that small molecule targeting of nucleophosmin 1 (NPM1) represents a rational approach for radiosensitization.
METHODS AND MATERIALS - Wilde-type and NPM1-deficient mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) were used to determine whether radiosensitization produced by the small molecule YTR107 was NPM1 dependent. The stress response to ionizing radiation was assessed by quantifying pNPM1, γH2AX, and Rad51 foci, neutral comet tail moment, and colony formation. NPM1 levels in a human-derived non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tissue microarray (TMA) were determined by immunohistochemistry. YTR107-mediated radiosensitization was assessed in NSCLC cell lines and xenografts.
RESULTS - Use of NPM1-null MEFs demonstrated that NPM1 is critical for DNA double- strand break (DSB) repair, that loss of NPM1 increases radiation sensitivity, and that YTR107-mediated radiosensitization is NPM1 dependent. YTR107 was shown to inhibit NPM1 oligomerization and impair formation of pNPM1 irradiation-induced foci that colocalized with γH2AX foci. Analysis of the TMA demonstrated that NPM1 is overexpressed in subsets of NSCLC. YTR107 inhibited DNA DSB repair and radiosensitized NSCLC lines and xenografts.
CONCLUSIONS - These data demonstrate that YTR107-mediated targeting of NPM1 impairs DNA DSB repair, an event that increases radiation sensitivity.
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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21 MeSH Terms
Type 2 diabetes and congenital hyperinsulinism cause DNA double-strand breaks and p53 activity in β cells.
Tornovsky-Babeay S, Dadon D, Ziv O, Tzipilevich E, Kadosh T, Schyr-Ben Haroush R, Hija A, Stolovich-Rain M, Furth-Lavi J, Granot Z, Porat S, Philipson LH, Herold KC, Bhatti TR, Stanley C, Ashcroft FM, In't Veld P, Saada A, Magnuson MA, Glaser B, Dor Y
(2014) Cell Metab 19: 109-21
MeSH Terms: Animals, Biomarkers, Calcineurin, Cell Death, Cell Proliferation, Congenital Hyperinsulinism, DNA Breaks, Double-Stranded, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Disease Models, Animal, Enzyme Activation, Enzyme Induction, Fasting, Glucagon-Like Peptide 1, Glucokinase, Glucose, Humans, Insulin-Secreting Cells, Membrane Potentials, Mice, Transgenes, Tumor Suppressor Protein p53
Show Abstract · Added February 11, 2014
β cell failure in type 2 diabetes (T2D) is associated with hyperglycemia, but the mechanisms are not fully understood. Congenital hyperinsulinism caused by glucokinase mutations (GCK-CHI) is associated with β cell replication and apoptosis. Here, we show that genetic activation of β cell glucokinase, initially triggering replication, causes apoptosis associated with DNA double-strand breaks and activation of the tumor suppressor p53. ATP-sensitive potassium channels (KATP channels) and calcineurin mediate this toxic effect. Toxicity of long-term glucokinase overactivity was confirmed by finding late-onset diabetes in older members of a GCK-CHI family. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) mimetic treatment or p53 deletion rescues β cells from glucokinase-induced death, but only GLP-1 analog rescues β cell function. DNA damage and p53 activity in T2D suggest shared mechanisms of β cell failure in hyperglycemia and CHI. Our results reveal membrane depolarization via KATP channels, calcineurin signaling, DNA breaks, and p53 as determinants of β cell glucotoxicity and suggest pharmacological approaches to enhance β cell survival in diabetes.
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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21 MeSH Terms
Dual targeting of EWS-FLI1 activity and the associated DNA damage response with trabectedin and SN38 synergistically inhibits Ewing sarcoma cell growth.
Grohar PJ, Segars LE, Yeung C, Pommier Y, D'Incalci M, Mendoza A, Helman LJ
(2014) Clin Cancer Res 20: 1190-203
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antineoplastic Agents, Camptothecin, Cell Line, Tumor, DNA Breaks, Double-Stranded, DNA Damage, Dioxoles, Disease Models, Animal, Doxorubicin, Drug Resistance, Neoplasm, Drug Synergism, Exodeoxyribonucleases, Female, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Gene Silencing, Humans, Irinotecan, Mice, Oncogene Proteins, Fusion, Phenotype, Proto-Oncogene Protein c-fli-1, RNA Interference, RNA, Small Interfering, RNA-Binding Protein EWS, RecQ Helicases, Sarcoma, Ewing, Tetrahydroisoquinolines, Trabectedin, Werner Syndrome Helicase, Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
PURPOSE - The goal of this study is to optimize the activity of trabectedin for Ewing sarcoma by developing a molecularly targeted combination therapy.
EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN - We have recently shown that trabectedin interferes with the activity of EWS-FLI1 in Ewing sarcoma cells. In this report, we build on this work to develop a trabectedin-based combination therapy with improved EWS-FLI1 suppression that also targets the drug-associated DNA damage to Ewing sarcoma cells.
RESULTS - We demonstrate by siRNA experiments that EWS-FLI1 drives the expression of the Werner syndrome protein (WRN) in Ewing sarcoma cells. Because WRN-deficient cells are known to be hypersensitive to camptothecins, we utilize trabectedin to block EWS-FLI1 activity, suppress WRN expression, and selectively sensitize Ewing sarcoma cells to the DNA-damaging effects of SN38. We show that trabectedin and SN38 are synergistic, demonstrate an increase in DNA double-strand breaks, an accumulation of cells in S-phase and a low picomolar IC50. In addition, SN38 cooperates with trabectedin to augment the suppression of EWS-FLI1 downstream targets, leading to an improved therapeutic index in vivo. These effects translate into the marked regression of two Ewing sarcoma xenografts at a fraction of the dose of camptothecin used in other xenograft studies.
CONCLUSIONS - These results provide the basis and rationale for translating this drug combination to the clinic. In addition, the study highlights an approach that utilizes a targeted agent to interfere with an oncogenic transcription factor and then exploits the resulting changes in gene expression to develop a molecularly targeted combination therapy.
©2013 AACR
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30 MeSH Terms