Other search tools

About this data

The publication data currently available has been vetted by Vanderbilt faculty, staff, administrators and trainees. The data itself is retrieved directly from NCBI's PubMed and is automatically updated on a weekly basis to ensure accuracy and completeness.

If you have any questions or comments, please contact us.

Results: 1 to 10 of 137

Publication Record

Connections

Myosin IIA drives membrane bleb retraction.
Taneja N, Burnette DT
(2019) Mol Biol Cell 30: 1051-1059
MeSH Terms: Actins, Animals, Blister, COS Cells, Cell Membrane, Cell Membrane Structures, Cell Movement, Cell Surface Extensions, Cercopithecus aethiops, Cytokinesis, Cytoplasm, Cytoskeletal Proteins, HeLa Cells, Humans, Myosin Type II, Nerve Tissue Proteins, Nonmuscle Myosin Type IIA, Nonmuscle Myosin Type IIB
Show Abstract · Added March 27, 2019
Membrane blebs are specialized cellular protrusions that play diverse roles in processes such as cell division and cell migration. Blebbing can be divided into three distinct phases: bleb nucleation, bleb growth, and bleb retraction. Following nucleation and bleb growth, the actin cortex, comprising actin, cross-linking proteins, and nonmuscle myosin II (MII), begins to reassemble on the membrane. MII then drives the final phase, bleb retraction, which results in reintegration of the bleb into the cellular cortex. There are three MII paralogues with distinct biophysical properties expressed in mammalian cells: MIIA, MIIB, and MIIC. Here we show that MIIA specifically drives bleb retraction during cytokinesis. The motor domain and regulation of the nonhelical tailpiece of MIIA both contribute to its ability to drive bleb retraction. These experiments have also revealed a relationship between faster turnover of MIIA at the cortex and its ability to drive bleb retraction.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
18 MeSH Terms
Cdk1-dependent phosphoinhibition of a formin-F-BAR interaction opposes cytokinetic contractile ring formation.
Willet AH, Bohnert KA, Gould KL
(2018) Mol Biol Cell 29: 713-721
MeSH Terms: Actin Cytoskeleton, Actins, CDC2 Protein Kinase, Cell Cycle Proteins, Cell Division, Cytokinesis, Cytoskeletal Proteins, GTP-Binding Proteins, Phosphorylation, Schizosaccharomyces, Schizosaccharomyces pombe Proteins
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
In , cytokinesis requires the assembly and constriction of an actomyosin-based contractile ring (CR). A single essential formin, Cdc12, localizes to the cell middle upon mitotic onset and nucleates the F-actin of the CR. Cdc12 medial recruitment is mediated in part by its direct binding to the F-BAR scaffold Cdc15. Given that Cdc12 is hyperphosphorylated in M phase, we explored whether Cdc12 phosphoregulation impacts its association with Cdc15 during mitosis. We found that Cdk1, a major mitotic kinase, phosphorylates Cdc12 on six N-terminal residues near the Cdc15-binding site, and phosphorylation on these sites inhibits its interaction with the Cdc15 F-BAR domain. Consistent with this finding, a mutant with all six Cdk1 sites changed to phosphomimetic residues () displays phenotypes similar to , in which the Cdc15-binding motif is disrupted; both show reduced Cdc12 at the CR and delayed CR formation. Together, these results indicate that Cdk1 phosphorylation of formin Cdc12 antagonizes its interaction with Cdc15 and thereby opposes Cdc12's CR localization. These results are consistent with a general role for Cdk1 in inhibiting cytokinesis until chromosome segregation is complete.
© 2018 Willet et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
11 MeSH Terms
The C-terminal region of A-kinase anchor protein 350 (AKAP350A) enables formation of microtubule-nucleation centers and interacts with pericentriolar proteins.
Kolobova E, Roland JT, Lapierre LA, Williams JA, Mason TA, Goldenring JR
(2017) J Biol Chem 292: 20394-20409
MeSH Terms: A Kinase Anchor Proteins, Biomarkers, Cell Line, Centrosome, Cytoskeletal Proteins, Humans, Imaging, Three-Dimensional, Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins, Luminescent Proteins, Microscopy, Electron, Transmission, Microtubule-Associated Proteins, Microtubule-Organizing Center, Models, Molecular, Nerve Tissue Proteins, Peptide Fragments, Phosphoproteins, Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs, Protein Interaction Mapping, Protein Multimerization, Proteomics, RNA Interference, Recombinant Fusion Proteins, Recombinant Proteins, Two-Hybrid System Techniques
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2018
Microtubules in animal cells assemble (nucleate) from both the centrosome and the cis-Golgi cisternae. A-kinase anchor protein 350 kDa (AKAP350A, also called AKAP450/CG-NAP/AKAP9) is a large scaffolding protein located at both the centrosome and Golgi apparatus. Previous findings have suggested that AKAP350 is important for microtubule dynamics at both locations, but how this scaffolding protein assembles microtubule nucleation machinery is unclear. Here, we found that overexpression of the C-terminal third of AKAP350A, enhanced GFP-AKAP350A(2691-3907), induces the formation of multiple microtubule-nucleation centers (MTNCs). Nevertheless, these induced MTNCs lacked "true" centriole proteins, such as Cep135. Mapping analysis with AKAP350A truncations demonstrated that AKAP350A contains discrete regions responsible for promoting or inhibiting the formation of multiple MTNCs. Moreover, GFP-AKAP350A(2691-3907) recruited several pericentriolar proteins to MTNCs, including γ-tubulin, pericentrin, Cep68, Cep170, and Cdk5RAP2. Proteomic analysis indicated that Cdk5RAP2 and Cep170 both interact with the microtubule nucleation-promoting region of AKAP350A, whereas Cep68 interacts with the distal C-terminal AKAP350A region. Yeast two-hybrid assays established a direct interaction of Cep170 with AKAP350A. Super-resolution and deconvolution microscopy analyses were performed to define the association of AKAP350A with centrosomes, and these studies disclosed that AKAP350A spans the bridge between centrioles, co-localizing with rootletin and Cep68 in the linker region. siRNA-mediated depletion of AKAP350A caused displacement of both Cep68 and Cep170 from the centrosome. These results suggest that AKAP350A acts as a scaffold for factors involved in microtubule nucleation at the centrosome and coordinates the assembly of protein complexes associating with the intercentriolar bridge.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms
Trafficking Ion Transporters to the Apical Membrane of Polarized Intestinal Enterocytes.
Engevik AC, Goldenring JR
(2018) Cold Spring Harb Perspect Biol 10:
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Membrane, Cell Polarity, Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator, Cytoskeletal Proteins, Enterocytes, Humans, Ion Transport, Malabsorption Syndromes, Membrane Transport Proteins, Microvilli, Mucolipidoses, Myosin Heavy Chains, Myosin Type V, Protein Transport, Sodium-Hydrogen Exchanger 3
Show Abstract · Added April 18, 2017
Epithelial cells lining the gastrointestinal tract require distinct apical and basolateral domains to function properly. Trafficking and insertion of enzymes and transporters into the apical brush border of intestinal epithelial cells is essential for effective digestion and absorption of nutrients. Specific critical ion transporters are delivered to the apical brush border to facilitate fluid and electrolyte uptake. Maintenance of these apical transporters requires both targeted delivery and regulated membrane recycling. Examination of altered apical trafficking in patients with Microvillus Inclusion disease caused by inactivating mutations in MYO5B has led to insights into the regulation of apical trafficking by elements of the apical recycling system. Modeling of MYO5B loss in cell culture and animal models has led to recognition of Rab11a and Rab8a as critical regulators of apical brush border function. All of these studies show the importance of apical membrane trafficking dynamics in maintenance of polarized epithelial cell function.
Copyright © 2018 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
16 MeSH Terms
The LIM protein complex establishes a retinal circuitry of visual adaptation by regulating Pax6 α-enhancer activity.
Kim Y, Lim S, Ha T, Song YH, Sohn YI, Park DJ, Paik SS, Kim-Kaneyama JR, Song MR, Leung A, Levine EM, Kim IB, Goo YS, Lee SH, Kang KH, Kim JW
(2017) Elife 6:
MeSH Terms: Adaptation, Ocular, Animals, Cytoskeletal Proteins, DNA-Binding Proteins, Enhancer Elements, Genetic, Gene Expression Regulation, LIM Domain Proteins, LIM-Homeodomain Proteins, Mice, Mice, Knockout, PAX6 Transcription Factor, Retina, Transcription Factors
Show Abstract · Added February 14, 2018
The visual responses of vertebrates are sensitive to the overall composition of retinal interneurons including amacrine cells, which tune the activity of the retinal circuitry. The expression of is regulated by multiple cis-DNA elements including the intronic α-enhancer, which is active in GABAergic amacrine cell subsets. Here, we report that the transforming growth factor ß1-induced transcript 1 protein (Tgfb1i1) interacts with the LIM domain transcription factors Lhx3 and Isl1 to inhibit the α-enhancer in the post-natal mouse retina. mice show elevated α-enhancer activity leading to overproduction of Pax6ΔPD isoform that supports the GABAergic amacrine cell fate maintenance. Consequently, the mouse retinas show a sustained light response, which becomes more transient in mice with the auto-stimulation-defective mutation. Together, we show the antagonistic regulation of the α-enhancer activity by Pax6 and the LIM protein complex is necessary for the establishment of an inner retinal circuitry, which controls visual adaptation.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
13 MeSH Terms
Comparative genetic screens in human cells reveal new regulatory mechanisms in WNT signaling.
Lebensohn AM, Dubey R, Neitzel LR, Tacchelly-Benites O, Yang E, Marceau CD, Davis EM, Patel BB, Bahrami-Nejad Z, Travaglini KJ, Ahmed Y, Lee E, Carette JE, Rohatgi R
(2016) Elife 5:
MeSH Terms: Casein Kinase I, Cytoskeletal Proteins, Gene Expression Regulation, Gene Regulatory Networks, Genes, Reporter, Genetic Testing, Haploidy, Humans, Wnt Proteins, Wnt Signaling Pathway
Show Abstract · Added February 13, 2017
The comprehensive understanding of cellular signaling pathways remains a challenge due to multiple layers of regulation that may become evident only when the pathway is probed at different levels or critical nodes are eliminated. To discover regulatory mechanisms in canonical WNT signaling, we conducted a systematic forward genetic analysis through reporter-based screens in haploid human cells. Comparison of screens for negative, attenuating and positive regulators of WNT signaling, mediators of R-spondin-dependent signaling and suppressors of constitutive signaling induced by loss of the tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli or casein kinase 1α uncovered new regulatory features at most levels of the pathway. These include a requirement for the transcription factor AP-4, a role for the DAX domain of AXIN2 in controlling β-catenin transcriptional activity, a contribution of glycophosphatidylinositol anchor biosynthesis and glypicans to R-spondin-potentiated WNT signaling, and two different mechanisms that regulate signaling when distinct components of the β-catenin destruction complex are lost. The conceptual and methodological framework we describe should enable the comprehensive understanding of other signaling systems.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
10 MeSH Terms
Quantitative proteomic changes during post myocardial infarction remodeling reveals altered cardiac metabolism and Desmin aggregation in the infarct region.
Datta K, Basak T, Varshney S, Sengupta S, Sarkar S
(2017) J Proteomics 152: 283-299
MeSH Terms: Cytoskeletal Proteins, Desmin, Heart Failure, Humans, Myocardial Infarction, Myocardium, Oxidative Stress, Proteomics, Spatio-Temporal Analysis, Ventricular Remodeling
Show Abstract · Added November 3, 2017
Myocardial infarction is one of the leading causes of cardiac dysfunction, failure and sudden death. Post infarction cardiac remodeling presents a poor prognosis, with 30%-45% of patients developing heart failure, in a period of 5-25years. Oxidative stress has been labelled as the primary causative factor for cardiac damage during infarction, however, the impact it may have during the process of post infarction remodeling has not been well probed. In this study, we have implemented iTRAQ proteomics to catalogue proteins and functional processes, participating both temporally (early and late phases) and spatially (infarct and remote zones), during post myocardial infarction remodeling of the heart as functions of the differential oxidative stress manifest during the remodeling process. Cardiac metabolism was the dominant network to be affected during infarction and the remodeling time points considered in this study. A distinctive expression pattern of cytoskeletal proteins was also observed with increased remodeling time points. Further, it was found that the cytoskeletal protein Desmin, aggregated in the infarct zone during the remodeling process, mediated by the protease Calpain1. Taken together, all of these data in conjunction may lay the foundation to understand the effects of oxidative stress on the remodeling process and elaborate the mechanism behind the compromised cardiac function observed during post myocardial infarction remodeling.
SIGNIFICANCE - Oxidative stress is the major driving force for cardiac damage during myocardial infarction. However, the impact of oxidative stress on the process of post MI remodeling in conducting the heart towards functional failure has not been well explored. In this study, a spatial and temporal approach was taken to elaborate the major proteins and cellular processes involved in post MI remodeling. Based on level/ intensity of ROS, spatially, infarct and noninfarct zones were chosen for analysis while on the temporal scale, early (30days) and late time points (120days) post MI were included in the study. This design enabled us to delineate the differential protein expression on a spectrum of maximum oxidative stress at infarct zone during MI to minimum oxidative stress at noninfarct zone during late time point post MI. The proteome profiles for each of the study groups when comparatively analysed gave a holistic idea about the dominant cellular processes involved in post MI remodeling such as cardiac metabolism, both for short term and long term remodeling as well as unique processes such as Desmin mediated cytoskeletal remodeling of the infarcted myocardium that are involved in the compromise of cardiac function.
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
10 MeSH Terms
A prospective study of autoantibodies to Ezrin and pancreatic cancer risk.
Sun Y, Wu J, Cai H, Wang S, Liu Q, Blot WJ, Shu XO, Cai Q
(2016) Cancer Causes Control 27: 831-5
MeSH Terms: Aged, Autoantibodies, Case-Control Studies, Cytoskeletal Proteins, Early Detection of Cancer, Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay, Female, Humans, Logistic Models, Male, Middle Aged, Pancreatic Neoplasms, Prospective Studies, Risk, United States
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2018
PURPOSE - No biomarker is available for pancreatic cancer early detection, but a small prospective European study involving 16 cases and 32 controls raised the possibility that anti-Ezrin autoantibodies may be associated with risk of pancreatic cancer. We aimed to validate this finding in a case-control study nested within a prospective study in the USA.
METHODS - Levels of anti-Ezrin autoantibodies were examined using ELISA in pre-diagnostic plasma samples of 73 cases and 145 matched controls. Paired t test and paired signed rank tests were used to determine the difference between two groups, and conditional logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between anti-Ezrin autoantibody levels and risk of developing pancreatic cancer.
RESULTS - No association was found between levels of anti-Ezrin plasma autoantibodies and subsequent risk of developing pancreatic cancer.
CONCLUSION - Anti-Ezrin autoantibodies did not appear to be useful as a plasma biomarker for early detection of pancreatic cancer.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms
Serotonin 2B Receptor Antagonism Prevents Heritable Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.
West JD, Carrier EJ, Bloodworth NC, Schroer AK, Chen P, Ryzhova LM, Gladson S, Shay S, Hutcheson JD, Merryman WD
(2016) PLoS One 11: e0148657
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptors, Type II, Cell Movement, Cytoskeletal Proteins, Gene Expression Profiling, Gene Expression Regulation, Hypertension, Pulmonary, Indoles, Lung, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, Muscle Contraction, Muscle Proteins, Mutation, Myocytes, Smooth Muscle, Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis, Phosphorylation, Protein Transport, Receptor, Serotonin, 5-HT2B, Serotonin Antagonists, Signal Transduction, Urea, Vascular Stiffness, src-Family Kinases
Show Abstract · Added April 11, 2017
Serotonergic anorexigens are the primary pharmacologic risk factor associated with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), and the resulting PAH is clinically indistinguishable from the heritable form of disease, associated with BMPR2 mutations. Both BMPR2 mutation and agonists to the serotonin receptor HTR2B have been shown to cause activation of SRC tyrosine kinase; conversely, antagonists to HTR2B inhibit SRC trafficking and downstream function. To test the hypothesis that a HTR2B antagonist can prevent BMRP2 mutation induced PAH by restricting aberrant SRC trafficking and downstream activity, we exposed BMPR2 mutant mice, which spontaneously develop PAH, to a HTR2B antagonist, SB204741, to block the SRC activation caused by BMPR2 mutation. SB204741 prevented the development of PAH in BMPR2 mutant mice, reduced recruitment of inflammatory cells to their lungs, and reduced muscularization of their blood vessels. By atomic force microscopy, we determined that BMPR2 mutant mice normally had a doubling of vessel stiffness, which was substantially normalized by HTR2B inhibition. SB204741 reduced SRC phosphorylation and downstream activity in BMPR2 mutant mice. Gene expression arrays indicate that the primary changes were in cytoskeletal and muscle contractility genes. These results were confirmed by gel contraction assays showing that HTR2B inhibition nearly normalizes the 400% increase in gel contraction normally seen in BMPR2 mutant smooth muscle cells. Heritable PAH results from increased SRC activation, cellular contraction, and vascular resistance, but antagonism of HTR2B prevents SRC phosphorylation, downstream activity, and PAH in BMPR2 mutant mice.
0 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
24 MeSH Terms
Kindlin-2 cooperates with talin to activate integrins and induces cell spreading by directly binding paxillin.
Theodosiou M, Widmaier M, Böttcher RT, Rognoni E, Veelders M, Bharadwaj M, Lambacher A, Austen K, Müller DJ, Zent R, Fässler R
(2016) Elife 5: e10130
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Adhesion, Cell Line, Cell Movement, Cytoskeletal Proteins, Fibroblasts, Focal Adhesion Protein-Tyrosine Kinases, Integrin beta1, Manganese, Mice, Muscle Proteins, Paxillin, Protein Binding, Talin
Show Abstract · Added February 4, 2016
Integrins require an activation step prior to ligand binding and signaling. How talin and kindlin contribute to these events in non-hematopoietic cells is poorly understood. Here we report that fibroblasts lacking either talin or kindlin failed to activate β1 integrins, adhere to fibronectin (FN) or maintain their integrins in a high affinity conformation induced by Mn(2+). Despite compromised integrin activation and adhesion, Mn(2+) enabled talin- but not kindlin-deficient cells to initiate spreading on FN. This isotropic spreading was induced by the ability of kindlin to directly bind paxillin, which in turn bound focal adhesion kinase (FAK) resulting in FAK activation and the formation of lamellipodia. Our findings show that talin and kindlin cooperatively activate integrins leading to FN binding and adhesion, and that kindlin subsequently assembles an essential signaling node at newly formed adhesion sites in a talin-independent manner.
1 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
14 MeSH Terms