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Resolution of Gastric Cancer-Promoting Inflammation: A Novel Strategy for Anti-cancer Therapy.
Piazuelo MB, Riechelmann RP, Wilson KT, Algood HMS
(2019) Curr Top Microbiol Immunol 421: 319-359
MeSH Terms: Cytokines, Gastric Mucosa, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Humans, Inflammation, Stomach Neoplasms, Tumor Microenvironment
Show Abstract · Added June 6, 2019
The connection between inflammation and cancer was initially recognized by Rudolf Virchow in the nineteenth century. During the last decades, a large body of evidence has provided support to his hypothesis, and now inflammation is recognized as one of the hallmarks of cancer, both in etiopathogenesis and ongoing tumor growth. Infection with the pathogen Helicobacter pylori is the primary causal factor in 90% of gastric cancer (GC) cases. As we increase our understanding of how chronic inflammation develops in the stomach and contributes to carcinogenesis, there is increasing interest in targeting cancer-promoting inflammation as a strategy to treat GC. Moreover, once cancer develops and anti-cancer immune responses are suppressed, there is evidence of a substantial shift in the microenvironment and new targets for immune therapy emerge. In this chapter, we provide insight into inflammation-related factors, including T lymphocytes, macrophages, pro-inflammatory chemokines, and cytokines, which promote H. pylori-associated GC initiation and growth. While intervening with chronic inflammation is not a new practice in rheumatology or gastroenterology, this approach has not been fully explored for its potential to prevent carcinogenesis or to contribute to the treatment of GC. This review highlights current and possible strategies for therapeutic intervention including (i) targeting pro-inflammatory mediators, (ii) targeting growth factors and pathways involved in angiogenesis in the gastric tumor microenvironment, and (iii) enhancing anti-tumor immunity. In addition, we highlight a significant number of clinical trials and discuss the importance of individual tumor characterization toward offering personalized immune-related therapy.
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8 MeSH Terms
iNKT Cell Activation Exacerbates the Development of Huntington's Disease in R6/2 Transgenic Mice.
Park HJ, Lee SW, Im W, Kim M, Van Kaer L, Hong S
(2019) Mediators Inflamm 2019: 3540974
MeSH Terms: Animals, Brain, Cytokines, Disease Models, Animal, Disease Progression, Galactosylceramides, Genotype, Huntington Disease, Leukocytes, Lymphocyte Activation, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Natural Killer T-Cells
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder which is caused by a mutation of the huntingtin (HTT) gene. Although the pathogenesis of HD has been associated with inflammatory responses, if and how the immune system contributes to the onset of HD is largely unknown. Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are a group of innate-like regulatory T lymphocytes that can rapidly produce various cytokines such as IFN and IL4 upon stimulation with the glycolipid -galactosylceramide (-GalCer). By employing both R6/2 Tg mice (murine HD model) and J18 KO mice (deficient in iNKT cells), we investigated whether alterations of iNKT cells affect the development of HD in R6/2 Tg mice. We found that J18 KO R6/2 Tg mice showed disease progression comparable to R6/2 Tg mice, indicating that the absence of iNKT cells did not have any significant effects on HD development. However, repeated activation of iNKT cells with -GalCer facilitated HD progression in R6/2 Tg mice, and this was associated with increased infiltration of iNKT cells in the brain. Taken together, our results demonstrate that repeated -GalCer treatment of R6/2 Tg mice accelerates HD progression, suggesting that immune activation can affect the severity of HD pathogenesis.
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13 MeSH Terms
Increased Ripk1-mediated bone marrow necroptosis leads to myelodysplasia and bone marrow failure in mice.
Wagner PN, Shi Q, Salisbury-Ruf CT, Zou J, Savona MR, Fedoriw Y, Zinkel SS
(2019) Blood 133: 107-120
MeSH Terms: Animals, BH3 Interacting Domain Death Agonist Protein, Bone Marrow, Bone Marrow Diseases, Cells, Cultured, Cytokines, Hematopoietic Stem Cells, Inflammation, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Necrosis, Receptor-Interacting Protein Serine-Threonine Kinases, bcl-2 Homologous Antagonist-Killer Protein
Show Abstract · Added December 11, 2018
Hematopoiesis is a dynamic system that requires balanced cell division, differentiation, and death. The 2 major modes of programmed cell death, apoptosis and necroptosis, share molecular machinery but diverge in outcome with important implications for the microenvironment; apoptotic cells are removed in an immune silent process, whereas necroptotic cells leak cellular contents that incite inflammation. Given the importance of cytokine-directed cues for hematopoietic cell survival and differentiation, the impact on hematopoietic homeostasis of biasing cell death fate to necroptosis is substantial and poorly understood. Here, we present a mouse model with increased bone marrow necroptosis. Deletion of the proapoptotic Bcl-2 family members Bax and Bak inhibits bone marrow apoptosis. Further deletion of the BH3-only member Bid (to generate triple-knockout [TKO] mice) leads to unrestrained bone marrow necroptosis driven by increased Rip1 kinase (Ripk1). TKO mice display loss of progenitor cells, leading to increased cytokine production and increased stem cell proliferation and exhaustion and culminating in bone marrow failure. Genetically restoring Ripk1 to wild-type levels restores peripheral red cell counts as well as normal cytokine production. TKO bone marrow is hypercellular with abnormal differentiation, resembling the human disorder myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and we demonstrate increased necroptosis in MDS bone marrow. Finally, we show that Bid impacts necroptotic signaling through modulation of caspase-8-mediated Ripk1 degradation. Thus, we demonstrate that dysregulated necroptosis in hematopoiesis promotes bone marrow progenitor cell death that incites inflammation, impairs hematopoietic stem cells, and recapitulates the salient features of the bone marrow failure disorder MDS.
© 2019 by The American Society of Hematology.
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15 MeSH Terms
Inhibition of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Activation Is Associated With Improved Diabetic Nephropathy and Insulin Resistance in Type 2 Diabetes.
Li Z, Li Y, Overstreet JM, Chung S, Niu A, Fan X, Wang S, Wang Y, Zhang MZ, Harris RC
(2018) Diabetes 67: 1847-1857
MeSH Terms: Albuminuria, Animals, Biomarkers, Crosses, Genetic, Cytokines, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Diabetic Nephropathies, ErbB Receptors, Erlotinib Hydrochloride, Fibrosis, Glomerulonephritis, Hypoglycemic Agents, Insulin Resistance, Kidney, Macrophages, Membrane Transport Modulators, Mice, Knockout, Mice, Mutant Strains, Nitric Oxide Synthase Type III, Oxidative Stress, Protein Kinase Inhibitors, T-Lymphocytes, Transforming Growth Factor alpha
Show Abstract · Added November 9, 2018
Previous studies by us and others have indicated that renal epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) are activated in models of diabetic nephropathy (DN) and that inhibition of EGFR activity protects against progressive DN in type 1 diabetes. In this study we examined whether inhibition of EGFR activation would affect the development of DN in a mouse model of accelerated type 2 diabetes (BKS with endothelial nitric oxide knockout [eNOS]). eNOS mice received vehicle or erlotinib, an inhibitor of EGFR tyrosine kinase activity, beginning at 8 weeks of age and were sacrificed at 20 weeks of age. In addition, genetic models inhibiting EGFR activity () and transforming growth factor-α () were studied in this model of DN in type 2 diabetes. Compared with vehicle-treated mice, erlotinib-treated animals had less albuminuria and glomerulosclerosis, less podocyte loss, and smaller amounts of renal profibrotic and fibrotic components. Erlotinib treatment decreased renal oxidative stress, macrophage and T-lymphocyte infiltration, and the production of proinflammatory cytokines. Erlotinib treatment also preserved pancreas function, and these mice had higher blood insulin levels at 20 weeks, decreased basal blood glucose levels, increased glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, and increased blood levels of adiponectin compared with vehicle-treated mice. Similar to the aforementioned results, both and diabetic mice also had attenuated DN, preserved pancreas function, and decreased basal blood glucose levels. In this mouse model of accelerated DN, inhibition of EGFR signaling led to increased longevity.
© 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.
1 Communities
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23 MeSH Terms
Distinct Immunomodulatory Effects of Spermine Oxidase in Colitis Induced by Epithelial Injury or Infection.
Gobert AP, Al-Greene NT, Singh K, Coburn LA, Sierra JC, Verriere TG, Luis PB, Schneider C, Asim M, Allaman MM, Barry DP, Cleveland JL, Destefano Shields CE, Casero RA, Washington MK, Piazuelo MB, Wilson KT
(2018) Front Immunol 9: 1242
MeSH Terms: Animals, Citrobacter rodentium, Colitis, Cytokines, Dextran Sulfate, Disease Models, Animal, Gene Deletion, Immunity, Mucosal, Immunomodulation, Intestinal Mucosa, Male, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Oxidoreductases Acting on CH-NH Group Donors, Spermidine, Spermine
Show Abstract · Added June 23, 2018
Polyamines have been implicated in numerous biological processes, including inflammation and carcinogenesis. Homeostatic regulation leads to interconversion of the polyamines putrescine and the downstream metabolites spermidine and spermine. The enzyme spermine oxidase (SMOX), which back-converts spermine to spermidine, contributes to regulation of polyamine levels, but can also have other effects. We have implicated SMOX in gastric inflammation and carcinogenesis due to infection by the pathogen . In addition, we reported that SMOX can be upregulated in humans with inflammatory bowel disease. Herein, we utilized -deficient mice to examine the role of SMOX in two murine colitis models, infection and dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced epithelial injury. In -infected wild-type (WT) mice, there were marked increases in colon weight/length and histologic injury, with mucosal hyperplasia and inflammatory cell infiltration; these changes were ameliorated in mice. In contrast, with DSS, mice exhibited substantial mortality, and increased body weight loss, colon weight/length, and histologic damage. In -infected WT mice, there were increased colonic levels of the chemokines CCL2, CCL3, CCL4, CXCL1, CXCL2, and CXCL10, and the cytokines IL-6, TNF-α, CSF3, IFN-γ, and IL-17; each were downregulated in mice. In DSS colitis, increased levels of IL-6, CSF3, and IL-17 were further increased in mice. In both models, putrescine and spermidine were increased in WT mice; in mice, the main effect was decreased spermidine and spermidine/spermine ratio. With , polyamine levels correlated with histologic injury, while with DSS, spermidine was inversely correlated with injury. Our studies indicate that SMOX has immunomodulatory effects in experimental colitis polyamine flux. Thus, SMOX contributes to the immunopathogenesis of infection, but is protective in DSS colitis, indicating the divergent effects of spermidine.
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16 MeSH Terms
A potential therapeutic role for angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 in human pulmonary arterial hypertension.
Hemnes AR, Rathinasabapathy A, Austin EA, Brittain EL, Carrier EJ, Chen X, Fessel JP, Fike CD, Fong P, Fortune N, Gerszten RE, Johnson JA, Kaplowitz M, Newman JH, Piana R, Pugh ME, Rice TW, Robbins IM, Wheeler L, Yu C, Loyd JE, West J
(2018) Eur Respir J 51:
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Animals, Biomarkers, Cytokines, Female, Gene Expression, Humans, Hypertension, Pulmonary, Male, Middle Aged, Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A, Pilot Projects, Proof of Concept Study, Proto-Oncogene Proteins, Pulmonary Artery, Receptors, G-Protein-Coupled, Superoxide Dismutase, Swine, Vascular Resistance
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a deadly disease with no cure. Alternate conversion of angiotensin II (AngII) to angiotensin-(1-7) (Ang-(1-7)) by angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) resulting in Mas receptor (Mas1) activation improves rodent models of PAH. Effects of recombinant human (rh) ACE2 in human PAH are unknown. Our objective was to determine the effects of rhACE2 in PAH.We defined the molecular effects of Mas1 activation using porcine pulmonary arteries, measured AngII/Ang-(1-7) levels in human PAH and conducted a phase IIa, open-label pilot study of a single infusion of rhACE2 (GSK2586881, 0.2 or 0.4 mg·kg intravenously).Superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) and inflammatory gene expression were identified as markers of Mas1 activation. After confirming reduced plasma ACE2 activity in human PAH, five patients were enrolled in the trial. GSK2586881 was well tolerated with significant improvement in cardiac output and pulmonary vascular resistance. GSK2586881 infusion was associated with reduced plasma markers of inflammation within 2-4 h and increased SOD2 plasma protein at 2 weeks.PAH is characterised by reduced ACE2 activity. Augmentation of ACE2 in a pilot study was well tolerated, associated with improved pulmonary haemodynamics and reduced markers of oxidant and inflammatory mediators. Targeting this pathway may be beneficial in human PAH.
Copyright ©ERS 2018.
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20 MeSH Terms
Ornithine Decarboxylase in Macrophages Exacerbates Colitis and Promotes Colitis-Associated Colon Carcinogenesis by Impairing M1 Immune Responses.
Singh K, Coburn LA, Asim M, Barry DP, Allaman MM, Shi C, Washington MK, Luis PB, Schneider C, Delgado AG, Piazuelo MB, Cleveland JL, Gobert AP, Wilson KT
(2018) Cancer Res 78: 4303-4315
MeSH Terms: Animals, Azoxymethane, Carcinogenesis, Colitis, Ulcerative, Colon, Colonic Neoplasms, Cytokines, Dextran Sulfate, Inflammation, Macrophage Activation, Macrophages, Male, Mice, Ornithine Decarboxylase, Transcription, Genetic, Up-Regulation
Show Abstract · Added June 15, 2018
Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) is the rate-limiting enzyme for polyamine biosynthesis and restricts M1 macrophage activation in gastrointestinal (GI) infections. However, the role of macrophage ODC in colonic epithelial-driven inflammation is unknown. Here, we investigate cell-specific effects of ODC in colitis and colitis-associated carcinogenesis (CAC). Human colonic macrophages expressed increased ODC levels in active ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, colitis-associated dysplasia, and CAC. Mice lacking in myeloid cells ( mice) that were treated with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) exhibited improved survival, body weight, and colon length and reduced histologic injury versus control mice. In contrast, GI epithelial-specific knockout had no effect on clinical parameters. Despite reduced histologic damage, colitis tissues of mice had increased levels of multiple proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines and enhanced expression of M1, but not M2 markers. In the azoxymethane-DSS model of CAC, mice had reduced tumor number, burden, and high-grade dysplasia. Tumors from mice had increased M1, but not M2 macrophages. Increased levels of histone 3, lysine 9 acetylation, a marker of open chromatin, were manifest in tumor macrophages of mice, consistent with our findings that macrophage ODC affects histone modifications that upregulate M1 gene transcription during GI infections. These findings support the concept that macrophage ODC augments epithelial injury-associated colitis and CAC by impairing the M1 responses that stimulate epithelial repair, antimicrobial defense, and antitumoral immunity. They also suggest that macrophage ODC is an important target for colon cancer chemoprevention. Ornithine decarboxylase contributes to the pathogenesis of colitis and associated carcinogenesis by impairing M1 macrophage responses needed for antitumoral immunity; targeting ODC in macrophages may represent a new strategy for chemoprevention. .
©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.
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16 MeSH Terms
Cdk1-dependent phosphoinhibition of a formin-F-BAR interaction opposes cytokinetic contractile ring formation.
Willet AH, Bohnert KA, Gould KL
(2018) Mol Biol Cell 29: 713-721
MeSH Terms: Actin Cytoskeleton, Actins, CDC2 Protein Kinase, Cell Cycle Proteins, Cell Division, Cytokinesis, Cytoskeletal Proteins, GTP-Binding Proteins, Phosphorylation, Schizosaccharomyces, Schizosaccharomyces pombe Proteins
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
In , cytokinesis requires the assembly and constriction of an actomyosin-based contractile ring (CR). A single essential formin, Cdc12, localizes to the cell middle upon mitotic onset and nucleates the F-actin of the CR. Cdc12 medial recruitment is mediated in part by its direct binding to the F-BAR scaffold Cdc15. Given that Cdc12 is hyperphosphorylated in M phase, we explored whether Cdc12 phosphoregulation impacts its association with Cdc15 during mitosis. We found that Cdk1, a major mitotic kinase, phosphorylates Cdc12 on six N-terminal residues near the Cdc15-binding site, and phosphorylation on these sites inhibits its interaction with the Cdc15 F-BAR domain. Consistent with this finding, a mutant with all six Cdk1 sites changed to phosphomimetic residues () displays phenotypes similar to , in which the Cdc15-binding motif is disrupted; both show reduced Cdc12 at the CR and delayed CR formation. Together, these results indicate that Cdk1 phosphorylation of formin Cdc12 antagonizes its interaction with Cdc15 and thereby opposes Cdc12's CR localization. These results are consistent with a general role for Cdk1 in inhibiting cytokinesis until chromosome segregation is complete.
© 2018 Willet et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).
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11 MeSH Terms
Systemic inflammation is associated with exaggerated skeletal muscle protein catabolism in maintenance hemodialysis patients.
Deger SM, Hung AM, Gamboa JL, Siew ED, Ellis CD, Booker C, Sha F, Li H, Bian A, Stewart TG, Zent R, Mitch WE, Abumrad NN, Ikizler TA
(2017) JCI Insight 2:
MeSH Terms: Adult, Animals, Biomarkers, C-Reactive Protein, Cytokines, Disease Models, Animal, Female, Homeostasis, Humans, Inflammation, Integrin beta1, Kinetics, Male, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Middle Aged, Multivariate Analysis, Muscle Proteins, Muscle, Skeletal, Regression Analysis, Renal Dialysis, Renal Insufficiency, Chronic, SKP Cullin F-Box Protein Ligases, Tripartite Motif Proteins, Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
BACKGROUND - Systemic inflammation and muscle wasting are highly prevalent and coexist in patients on maintenance hemodialysis (MHD). We aimed to determine the effects of systemic inflammation on skeletal muscle protein metabolism in MHD patients.
METHODS - Whole body and skeletal muscle protein turnover were assessed by stable isotope kinetic studies. We incorporated expressions of E1, E214K, E3αI, E3αII, MuRF-1, and atrogin-1 in skeletal muscle tissue from integrin β1 gene KO CKD mice models.
RESULTS - Among 129 patients with mean (± SD) age 47 ± 12 years, 74% were African American, 73% were male, and 22% had diabetes mellitus. Median high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) concentration was 13 (interquartile range 0.8, 33) mg/l. There were statistically significant associations between hs-CRP and forearm skeletal muscle protein synthesis, degradation, and net forearm skeletal muscle protein balance (P < 0.001 for all). The associations remained statistically significant after adjustment for clinical and demographic confounders, as well as in sensitivity analysis, excluding patients with diabetes mellitus. In attempting to identify potential mechanisms involved in this correlation, we show increased expressions of E1, E214K, E3αI, E3αII, MuRF-1, and atrogin-1 in skeletal muscle tissue obtained from an animal model of chronic kidney disease.
CONCLUSION - These data suggest that systemic inflammation is a strong and independent determinant of skeletal muscle protein homeostasis in MHD patients, providing rationale for further studies using anticytokine therapies in patients with underlying systemic inflammation.
FUNDING - This study was in part supported by NIH grants R01 DK45604 and 1K24 DK62849, the Clinical Translational Science Award UL1-TR000445 from the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, the Veterans Administration Merit Award I01 CX000414, the SatelliteHealth Normon Coplon Extramural Grant Program, and the FDA grant 000943.
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25 MeSH Terms
Dendritic Cell Amiloride-Sensitive Channels Mediate Sodium-Induced Inflammation and Hypertension.
Barbaro NR, Foss JD, Kryshtal DO, Tsyba N, Kumaresan S, Xiao L, Mernaugh RL, Itani HA, Loperena R, Chen W, Dikalov S, Titze JM, Knollmann BC, Harrison DG, Kirabo A
(2017) Cell Rep 21: 1009-1020
MeSH Terms: Amiloride, Animals, Cells, Cultured, Cytokines, Dendritic Cells, Epithelial Sodium Channel Blockers, Epithelial Sodium Channels, Hypertension, Inflammation, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, NADPH Oxidases, Oxidative Stress, Prostaglandins E, Protein Kinase C, Sodium, Sodium-Hydrogen Exchanger 1, Superoxides
Show Abstract · Added December 27, 2017
Sodium accumulates in the interstitium and promotes inflammation through poorly defined mechanisms. We describe a pathway by which sodium enters dendritic cells (DCs) through amiloride-sensitive channels including the alpha and gamma subunits of the epithelial sodium channel and the sodium hydrogen exchanger 1. This leads to calcium influx via the sodium calcium exchanger, activation of protein kinase C (PKC), phosphorylation of p47, and association of p47 with gp91. The assembled NADPH oxidase produces superoxide with subsequent formation of immunogenic isolevuglandin (IsoLG)-protein adducts. DCs activated by excess sodium produce increased interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and promote T cell production of cytokines IL-17A and interferon gamma (IFN-γ). When adoptively transferred into naive mice, these DCs prime hypertension in response to a sub-pressor dose of angiotensin II. These findings provide a mechanistic link between salt, inflammation, and hypertension involving increased oxidative stress and IsoLG production in DCs.
Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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19 MeSH Terms