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Structural analyses of sterol 14α-demethylase complexed with azole drugs address the molecular basis of azole-mediated inhibition of fungal sterol biosynthesis.
Hargrove TY, Friggeri L, Wawrzak Z, Qi A, Hoekstra WJ, Schotzinger RJ, York JD, Guengerich FP, Lepesheva GI
(2017) J Biol Chem 292: 6728-6743
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antifungal Agents, Azoles, Candida albicans, Crystallization, Fungal Proteins, Heme, Humans, Kinetics, Ligands, Microbial Sensitivity Tests, Protein Binding, Protein Conformation, Protons, Rats, Sterol 14-Demethylase, Sterols
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
With some advances in modern medicine (such as cancer chemotherapy, broad exposure to antibiotics, and immunosuppression), the incidence of opportunistic fungal pathogens such as has increased. Cases of drug resistance among these pathogens have become more frequent, requiring the development of new drugs and a better understanding of the targeted enzymes. Sterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51) is a cytochrome P450 enzyme required for biosynthesis of sterols in eukaryotic cells and is the major target of clinical drugs for managing fungal pathogens, but some of the CYP51 key features important for rational drug design have remained obscure. We report the catalytic properties, ligand-binding profiles, and inhibition of enzymatic activity of CYP51 by clinical antifungal drugs that are used systemically (fluconazole, voriconazole, ketoconazole, itraconazole, and posaconazole) and topically (miconazole and clotrimazole) and by a tetrazole-based drug candidate, VT-1161 (oteseconazole: ()-2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)-1,1-difluoro-3-(1-tetrazol-1-yl)-1-(5-(4-(2,2,2-trifluoroethoxy)phenyl)pyridin-2-yl)propan-2-ol). Among the compounds tested, the first-line drug fluconazole was the weakest inhibitor, whereas posaconazole and VT-1161 were the strongest CYP51 inhibitors. We determined the X-ray structures of CYP51 complexes with posaconazole and VT-1161, providing a molecular mechanism for the potencies of these drugs, including the activity of VT-1161 against and , pathogens that are intrinsically resistant to fluconazole. Our comparative structural analysis outlines phylum-specific CYP51 features that could direct future rational development of more efficient broad-spectrum antifungals.
© 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.
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17 MeSH Terms
Structural basis for extracellular cis and trans RPTPσ signal competition in synaptogenesis.
Coles CH, Mitakidis N, Zhang P, Elegheert J, Lu W, Stoker AW, Nakagawa T, Craig AM, Jones EY, Aricescu AR
(2014) Nat Commun 5: 5209
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Differentiation, Chick Embryo, Coculture Techniques, Crystallization, Extracellular Matrix Proteins, Humans, Ligands, Mice, Neurogenesis, Neurons, Protein Binding, Protein Structure, Tertiary, Proteoglycans, Receptor, trkC, Receptor-Like Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases, Class 2, Signal Transduction, Synapses
Show Abstract · Added February 2, 2015
Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase sigma (RPTPσ) regulates neuronal extension and acts as a presynaptic nexus for multiple protein and proteoglycan interactions during synaptogenesis. Unknown mechanisms govern the shift in RPTPσ function, from outgrowth promotion to synaptic organization. Here, we report crystallographic, electron microscopic and small-angle X-ray scattering analyses, which reveal sufficient inter-domain flexibility in the RPTPσ extracellular region for interaction with both cis (same cell) and trans (opposite cell) ligands. Crystal structures of RPTPσ bound to its postsynaptic ligand TrkC detail an interaction surface partially overlapping the glycosaminoglycan-binding site. Accordingly, heparan sulphate and heparin oligomers compete with TrkC for RPTPσ binding in vitro and disrupt TrkC-dependent synaptic differentiation in neuronal co-culture assays. We propose that transient RPTPσ ectodomain emergence from the presynaptic proteoglycan layer allows capture by TrkC to form a trans-synaptic complex, the consequent reduction in RPTPσ flexibility potentiating interactions with additional ligands to orchestrate excitatory synapse formation.
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18 MeSH Terms
Folate in demethylation: the crystal structure of the rat dimethylglycine dehydrogenase complexed with tetrahydrofolate.
Luka Z, Pakhomova S, Loukachevitch LV, Newcomer ME, Wagner C
(2014) Biochem Biophys Res Commun 449: 392-8
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Animals, Binding Sites, Catalytic Domain, Crystallization, Crystallography, X-Ray, Dimethylglycine Dehydrogenase, Humans, Kinetics, Mitochondrial Proteins, Models, Molecular, Molecular Sequence Data, Rats, Sarcosine, Tetrahydrofolates
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
Dimethylglycine dehydrogenase (DMGDH) is a mammalian mitochondrial enzyme which plays an important role in the utilization of methyl groups derived from choline. DMGDH is a flavin containing enzyme which catalyzes the oxidative demethylation of dimethylglycine in vitro with the formation of sarcosine (N-methylglycine), hydrogen peroxide and formaldehyde. DMGDH binds tetrahydrofolate (THF) in vivo, which serves as an acceptor of formaldehyde and in the cell the product of the reaction is 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate instead of formaldehyde. To gain insight into the mechanism of the reaction we solved the crystal structures of the recombinant mature and precursor forms of rat DMGDH and DMGDH-THF complexes. Both forms of DMGDH reveal similar kinetic parameters and have the same tertiary structure fold with two domains formed by N- and C-terminal halves of the protein. The active center is located in the N-terminal domain while the THF binding site is located in the C-terminal domain about 40Å from the isoalloxazine ring of FAD. The folate binding site is connected with the enzyme active center via an intramolecular channel. This suggests the possible transfer of the intermediate imine of dimethylglycine from the active center to the bound THF where they could react producing a 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate. Based on the homology of the rat and human DMGDH the structural basis for the mechanism of inactivation of the human DMGDH by naturally occurring His109Arg mutation is proposed.
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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15 MeSH Terms
A structure-specific nucleic acid-binding domain conserved among DNA repair proteins.
Mason AC, Rambo RP, Greer B, Pritchett M, Tainer JA, Cortez D, Eichman BF
(2014) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 111: 7618-23
MeSH Terms: Adenosine Triphosphate, Animals, Chromatography, Affinity, Chromatography, Agarose, Chromatography, Gel, Chromatography, Ion Exchange, Cloning, Molecular, Crystallization, DNA Helicases, DNA Repair, Hydrolysis, Likelihood Functions, Mice, Models, Molecular, Nucleic Acids, Protein Structure, Tertiary, Scattering, Small Angle, X-Ray Diffraction
Show Abstract · Added May 19, 2014
SMARCAL1, a DNA remodeling protein fundamental to genome integrity during replication, is the only gene associated with the developmental disorder Schimke immuno-osseous dysplasia (SIOD). SMARCAL1-deficient cells show collapsed replication forks, S-phase cell cycle arrest, increased chromosomal breaks, hypersensitivity to genotoxic agents, and chromosomal instability. The SMARCAL1 catalytic domain (SMARCAL1(CD)) is composed of an SNF2-type double-stranded DNA motor ATPase fused to a HARP domain of unknown function. The mechanisms by which SMARCAL1 and other DNA translocases repair replication forks are poorly understood, in part because of a lack of structural information on the domains outside of the common ATPase motor. In the present work, we determined the crystal structure of the SMARCAL1 HARP domain and examined its conformation and assembly in solution by small angle X-ray scattering. We report that this domain is conserved with the DNA mismatch and damage recognition domains of MutS/MSH and NER helicase XPB, respectively, as well as with the putative DNA specificity motif of the T4 phage fork regression protein UvsW. Loss of UvsW fork regression activity by deletion of this domain was rescued by its replacement with HARP, establishing the importance of this domain in UvsW and demonstrating a functional complementarity between these structurally homologous domains. Mutation of predicted DNA-binding residues in HARP dramatically reduced fork binding and regression activities of SMARCAL1(CD). Thus, this work has uncovered a conserved substrate recognition domain in DNA repair enzymes that couples ATP-hydrolysis to remodeling of a variety of DNA structures, and provides insight into this domain's role in replication fork stability and genome integrity.
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18 MeSH Terms
Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the amidase domain of allophanate hydrolase from Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP.
Balotra S, Newman J, French NG, Briggs LJ, Peat TS, Scott C
(2014) Acta Crystallogr F Struct Biol Commun 70: 310-5
MeSH Terms: Allophanate Hydrolase, Amidohydrolases, Bacterial Proteins, Crystallization, Crystallography, X-Ray, Enzyme Stability, Proteolysis, Pseudomonas, Sequence Analysis, Protein, Trypsin
Show Abstract · Added March 20, 2014
The allophanate hydrolase from Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP was expressed and purified, and a tryptic digest fragment was subsequently identified, expressed and purified. This 50 kDa construct retained amidase activity and was crystallized. The crystals diffracted to 2.5 Å resolution and adopted space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 82.4, b = 179.2, c = 112.6 Å, β = 106.6°.
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10 MeSH Terms
Discovery of a potent stapled helix peptide that binds to the 70N domain of replication protein A.
Frank AO, Vangamudi B, Feldkamp MD, Souza-Fagundes EM, Luzwick JW, Cortez D, Olejniczak ET, Waterson AG, Rossanese OW, Chazin WJ, Fesik SW
(2014) J Med Chem 57: 2455-61
MeSH Terms: Alanine, Amino Acid Sequence, Cell Line, Crystallization, Crystallography, X-Ray, DNA, Single-Stranded, Drug Discovery, Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay, Fluorescence Polarization, Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Microscopy, Fluorescence, Models, Molecular, Molecular Sequence Data, Penetrance, Peptides, Protein Conformation, Replication Protein A, Structure-Activity Relationship, Tumor Suppressor Protein p53
Show Abstract · Added March 11, 2014
Stapled helix peptides can serve as useful tools for inhibiting protein-protein interactions but can be difficult to optimize for affinity. Here we describe the discovery and optimization of a stapled helix peptide that binds to the N-terminal domain of the 70 kDa subunit of replication protein A (RPA70N). In addition to applying traditional optimization strategies, we employed a novel approach for efficiently designing peptides containing unnatural amino acids. We discovered hot spots in the target protein using a fragment-based screen, identified the amino acid that binds to the hot spot, and selected an unnatural amino acid to incorporate, based on the structure-activity relationships of small molecules that bind to this site. The resulting stapled helix peptide potently and selectively binds to RPA70N, does not disrupt ssDNA binding, and penetrates cells. This peptide may serve as a probe to explore the therapeutic potential of RPA70N inhibition in cancer.
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4 Members
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19 MeSH Terms
Self-association of arrestin family members.
Chen Q, Zhuo Y, Kim M, Hanson SM, Francis DJ, Vishnivetskiy SA, Altenbach C, Klug CS, Hubbell WL, Gurevich VV
(2014) Handb Exp Pharmacol 219: 205-23
MeSH Terms: Animals, Arrestins, Crystallization, Humans, Phytic Acid, Protein Multimerization, Retinal Cone Photoreceptor Cells, Retinal Rod Photoreceptor Cells
Show Abstract · Added February 12, 2015
Mammals express four arrestin subtypes, three of which have been shown to self-associate. Cone photoreceptor-specific arrestin-4 is the only one that is a constitutive monomer. Visual arrestin-1 forms tetramers both in crystal and in solution, but the shape of its physiologically relevant solution tetramer is very different from that in the crystal. The biological role of the self-association of arrestin-1, expressed at very high levels in rod and cone photoreceptors, appears to be protective, reducing the concentration of cytotoxic monomers. The two nonvisual arrestin subtypes are highly homologous, and self-association of both is facilitated by IP6, yet they form dramatically different oligomers. Arrestin-2 apparently self-associates into "infinite" chains, very similar to those observed in IP6-soaked crystals, where IP6 connects the concave sides of the N- and C-domains of adjacent protomers. In contrast, arrestin-3 only forms dimers, in which IP6 likely connects the C-domains of two arrestin-3 molecules. Thus, each of the three self-associating arrestins does it in its own way, forming three different types of oligomers. The physiological role of the oligomerization of arrestin-1 and both nonvisual arrestins might be quite different, and in each case it remains to be definitively elucidated.
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8 MeSH Terms
Mechanism for activation of mutated epidermal growth factor receptors in lung cancer.
Red Brewer M, Yun CH, Lai D, Lemmon MA, Eck MJ, Pao W
(2013) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 110: E3595-604
MeSH Terms: Animals, Crystallization, Dimerization, ErbB Receptors, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Immunoblotting, Immunoprecipitation, Lung Neoplasms, Mice, Models, Molecular, Mutation, Missense, NIH 3T3 Cells, Protein Conformation, Receptor, ErbB-2
Show Abstract · Added March 7, 2014
The initiation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) kinase activity proceeds via an asymmetric dimerization mechanism in which a "donor" tyrosine kinase domain (TKD) contacts an "acceptor" TKD, leading to its activation. In the context of a ligand-induced dimer, identical wild-type EGFR TKDs are thought to assume the donor or acceptor roles in a random manner. Here, we present biochemical reconstitution data demonstrating that activated EGFR mutants found in lung cancer preferentially assume the acceptor role when coexpressed with WT EGFR. Mutated EGFRs show enhanced association with WT EGFR, leading to hyperphosphorylation of the WT counterpart. Mutated EGFRs also hyperphosphorylate the related erythroblastic leukemia viral oncogene (ErbB) family member, ErbB-2, in a similar manner. This directional "superacceptor activity" is particularly pronounced in the drug-resistant L834R/T766M mutant. A 4-Å crystal structure of this mutant in the active conformation reveals an asymmetric dimer interface that is essentially the same as that in WT EGFR. Asymmetric dimer formation induces an allosteric conformational change in the acceptor subunit. Thus, superacceptor activity likely arises simply from a lower energetic cost associated with this conformational change in the mutant EGFR compared with WT, rather than from any structural alteration that impairs the donor role of the mutant. Collectively, these findings define a previously unrecognized mode of mutant-specific intermolecular regulation for ErbB receptors, knowledge of which could potentially be exploited for therapeutic benefit.
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15 MeSH Terms
Surface reengineering of RPA70N enables cocrystallization with an inhibitor of the replication protein A interaction motif of ATR interacting protein.
Feldkamp MD, Frank AO, Kennedy JP, Patrone JD, Vangamudi B, Waterson AG, Fesik SW, Chazin WJ
(2013) Biochemistry 52: 6515-24
MeSH Terms: Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing, Crystallization, Crystallography, X-Ray, DNA-Binding Proteins, Fluorescence Polarization, Models, Molecular, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Biomolecular, Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs, Replication Protein A, Static Electricity
Show Abstract · Added March 7, 2014
Replication protein A (RPA) is the primary single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein in eukaryotes. The N-terminal domain of the RPA70 subunit (RPA70N) interacts via a basic cleft with a wide range of DNA processing proteins, including several that regulate DNA damage response and repair. Small molecule inhibitors that disrupt these protein-protein interactions are therefore of interest as chemical probes of these critical DNA processing pathways and as inhibitors to counter the upregulation of DNA damage response and repair associated with treatment of cancer patients with radiation or DNA-damaging agents. Determination of three-dimensional structures of protein-ligand complexes is an important step for elaboration of small molecule inhibitors. However, although crystal structures of free RPA70N and an RPA70N-peptide fusion construct have been reported, RPA70N-inhibitor complexes have been recalcitrant to crystallization. Analysis of the P61 lattice of RPA70N crystals led us to hypothesize that the ligand-binding surface was occluded. Surface reengineering to alter key crystal lattice contacts led to the design of RPA70N E7R, E100R, and E7R/E100R mutants. These mutants crystallized in a P212121 lattice that clearly had significant solvent channels open to the critical basic cleft. Analysis of X-ray crystal structures, target peptide binding affinities, and (15)N-(1)H heteronuclear single-quantum coherence nuclear magnetic resonance spectra showed that the mutations do not result in perturbations of the RPA70N ligand-binding surface. The success of the design was demonstrated by determining the structure of RPA70N E7R soaked with a ligand discovered in a previously reported molecular fragment screen. A fluorescence anisotropy competition binding assay revealed this compound can inhibit the interaction of RPA70N with the peptide binding motif from the DNA damage response protein ATRIP. The implications of the results are discussed in the context of ongoing efforts to design RPA70N inhibitors.
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10 MeSH Terms
Characterization and modeling of the oligomeric state and ligand binding behavior of purified translocator protein 18 kDa from Rhodobacter sphaeroides.
Li F, Xia Y, Meiler J, Ferguson-Miller S
(2013) Biochemistry 52: 5884-99
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Apoptosis, Binding, Competitive, Carrier Proteins, Cholesterol, Cryoelectron Microscopy, Crystallization, Isoquinolines, Membrane Proteins, Mitochondrial Membranes, Protein Multimerization, Protoporphyrins, Receptors, GABA-A, Rhodobacter sphaeroides, Sequence Alignment
Show Abstract · Added January 24, 2015
Translocator Protein 18 kDa (TSPO), previously known as the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR), is a mitochondrial outer membrane protein that has been identified as a key player in cholesterol and porphyrin transport, apoptotic signaling, and cancer development, as well as neurological inflammation and disease. Despite a number of TSPO ligands whose effects have been studied with respect to these varied biological activities, the nature of their interactions with TSPO and the molecular mechanism of their effects remain controversial, in part because of the lack of an atomic-resolution structure. We expressed and purified the homologue of mammalian TSPO from Rhodobacter sphaeroides (RsTSPO), as well as a mutant form in a proposed drug binding loop, RsTSPOW38C. We characterized their binding behaviors with endogenous ligands and a series of compounds that affect apoptosis by using a sensitive tryptophan fluorescence quenching assay. Our results show that RsTSPO behaves as a dimer in the purified state and binds with low micromolar affinity to many of these ligands, including retinoic acid, curcumin, and a known Bcl-2 inhibitor, gossypol, suggesting a possible direct role for TSPO in their regulation of apoptosis. A computational model of the RsTSPO dimer is constructed using EM-Fold, Rosetta, and a cryo-electron microscopy density map. Binding behaviors of known ligands are discussed in the context of the model with respect to regions that may be involved in binding.
1 Communities
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15 MeSH Terms