Other search tools

About this data

The publication data currently available has been vetted by Vanderbilt faculty, staff, administrators and trainees. The data itself is retrieved directly from NCBI's PubMed and is automatically updated on a weekly basis to ensure accuracy and completeness.

If you have any questions or comments, please contact us.

Results: 1 to 10 of 122

Publication Record

Connections

The sulfilimine cross-link of collagen IV contributes to kidney tubular basement membrane stiffness.
Bhave G, Colon S, Ferrell N
(2017) Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 313: F596-F602
MeSH Terms: Animals, Basement Membrane, Biomechanical Phenomena, Collagen Type IV, Cross-Linking Reagents, Elastic Modulus, Extracellular Matrix Proteins, Genotype, Imines, Kidney, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Peroxidase, Phenotype, Protein Conformation, Tensile Strength
Show Abstract · Added December 7, 2017
Basement membranes (BMs), a specialized form of extracellular matrix, underlie nearly all cell layers and provide structural support for tissues and interact with cell surface receptors to determine cell behavior. Both macromolecular composition and stiffness of the BM influence cell-BM interactions. Collagen IV is a major constituent of the BM that forms an extensively cross-linked oligomeric network. Its deficiency leads to BM mechanical instability, as observed with glomerular BM in Alport syndrome. These findings have led to the hypothesis that collagen IV and its cross-links determine BM stiffness. A sulfilimine bond (S = N) between a methionine sulfur and a lysine nitrogen cross-links collagen IV and is formed by the matrix enzyme peroxidasin. In peroxidasin knockout mice with reduced collagen IV sulfilimine cross-links, we find a reduction in renal tubular BM stiffness. Thus this work provides the first direct experimental evidence that collagen IV sulfilimine cross-links contribute to BM mechanical properties and provides a foundation for future work on the relationship of BM mechanics to cell function in renal disease.
Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.
1 Communities
0 Members
0 Resources
16 MeSH Terms
Trapping redox partnerships in oxidant-sensitive proteins with a small, thiol-reactive cross-linker.
Allan KM, Loberg MA, Chepngeno J, Hurtig JE, Tripathi S, Kang MG, Allotey JK, Widdershins AH, Pilat JM, Sizek HJ, Murphy WJ, Naticchia MR, David JB, Morano KA, West JD
(2016) Free Radic Biol Med 101: 356-366
MeSH Terms: Cross-Linking Reagents, Disulfides, Glutathione Peroxidase, Methionine Sulfoxide Reductases, Oxidants, Oxidation-Reduction, Oxidative Stress, Oxidoreductases Acting on Sulfur Group Donors, Peroxiredoxins, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins, Sulfhydryl Compounds, Sulfones, Thioredoxins, tert-Butylhydroperoxide
Show Abstract · Added April 24, 2017
A broad range of redox-regulated proteins undergo reversible disulfide bond formation on oxidation-prone cysteine residues. Heightened reactivity of the thiol groups in these cysteines also increases susceptibility to modification by organic electrophiles, a property that can be exploited in the study of redox networks. Here, we explored whether divinyl sulfone (DVSF), a thiol-reactive bifunctional electrophile, cross-links oxidant-sensitive proteins to their putative redox partners in cells. To test this idea, previously identified oxidant targets involved in oxidant defense (namely, peroxiredoxins, methionine sulfoxide reductases, sulfiredoxin, and glutathione peroxidases), metabolism, and proteostasis were monitored for cross-link formation following treatment of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with DVSF. Several proteins screened, including multiple oxidant defense proteins, underwent intermolecular and/or intramolecular cross-linking in response to DVSF. Specific redox-active cysteines within a subset of DVSF targets were found to influence cross-linking; in addition, DVSF-mediated cross-linking of its targets was impaired in cells first exposed to oxidants. Since cross-linking appeared to involve redox-active cysteines in these proteins, we examined whether potential redox partners became cross-linked to them upon DVSF treatment. Specifically, we found that several substrates of thioredoxins were cross-linked to the cytosolic thioredoxin Trx2 in cells treated with DVSF. However, other DVSF targets, like the peroxiredoxin Ahp1, principally formed intra-protein cross-links upon DVSF treatment. Moreover, additional protein targets, including several known to undergo S-glutathionylation, were conjugated via DVSF to glutathione. Our results indicate that DVSF is of potential use as a chemical tool for irreversibly trapping and discovering thiol-based redox partnerships within cells.
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
15 MeSH Terms
Dual drug delivery of tamoxifen and quercetin: Regulated metabolism for anticancer treatment with nanosponges.
Lockhart JN, Stevens DM, Beezer DB, Kravitz A, Harth E
(2015) J Control Release 220: 751-7
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols, Biological Availability, Biotransformation, Breast Neoplasms, Cell Line, Tumor, Cell Survival, Chemistry, Pharmaceutical, Cross-Linking Reagents, Cytochrome P-450 CYP3A, Delayed-Action Preparations, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Drug Carriers, Drug Stability, Female, Gastric Juice, Glucuronosyltransferase, Intestinal Secretions, Kinetics, Mice, Nanomedicine, Nanoparticles, Particle Size, Polyesters, Quercetin, Solubility, Tamoxifen
Show Abstract · Added February 15, 2016
We report the synthesis and encapsulation of polyester nanosponge particles (NPs) co-loaded with tamoxifen (TAM) and quercetin (QT) to investigate the loading, release and in vitro metabolism of a dual drug formulation. The NPs are made in two variations, 4% and 8% crosslinking densities, to evaluate the effects on metabolism and release kinetics. The NP-4% formulation with a particle size of 89.3 ± 14.8 nm was found to have loading percentages of 6.91 ± 0.13% TAM and 7.72 ± 0.15% QT after targeting 10% (w/w) each. The NP-8% formulation with a particle size of 91.5 ± 9.8 nm was found to have loading percentages of 7.26 ± 0.10% TAM and 7.80 ± 0.12% QT. The stability of the formulation was established in simulated gastrointestinal fluids, and the metabolism of TAM was shown to be reduced 2-fold and 3-fold for NP-4%s and NP-8%s, respectively, while QT metabolism was reduced 3 and 4-fold. The implications for improved bioavailability of the NP formulations were supported by cytotoxicity results that showed a similar efficacy to free dual drug formulations and even enhanced anti-cancer effects in the recovery condition. This work demonstrates the suitability of the nanosponges not only as a dual release drug delivery system but also enabling a regulated metabolism through the capacity of a nanonetwork. The variation in crosslinking enables a dual release with tailored release kinetics and suggests improved bioavailability aided by a reduced metabolism.
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
27 MeSH Terms
The Ancient Immunoglobulin Domains of Peroxidasin Are Required to Form Sulfilimine Cross-links in Collagen IV.
Ero-Tolliver IA, Hudson BG, Bhave G
(2015) J Biol Chem 290: 21741-8
MeSH Terms: Collagen Type IV, Cross-Linking Reagents, Evolution, Molecular, Extracellular Matrix, Extracellular Matrix Proteins, HEK293 Cells, Heme, Humans, Imines, Immunoglobulins, Models, Biological, Peroxidase, Peroxidases, Protein Binding, Protein Structure, Tertiary
Show Abstract · Added August 12, 2015
The collagen IV sulfilimine cross-link and its catalyzing enzyme, peroxidasin, represent a dyad critical for tissue development, which is conserved throughout the animal kingdom. Peroxidasin forms novel sulfilimine bonds between opposing methionine and hydroxylysine residues to structurally reinforce the collagen IV scaffold, a function critical for basement membrane and tissue integrity. However, the molecular mechanism underlying cross-link formation remains unclear. In this work, we demonstrate that the catalytic domain of peroxidasin and its immunoglobulin (Ig) domains are required for efficient sulfilimine bond formation. Thus, these molecular features underlie the evolutionarily conserved function of peroxidasin in tissue development and integrity and distinguish peroxidasin from other peroxidases, such as myeloperoxidase (MPO) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO).
© 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.
1 Communities
2 Members
1 Resources
15 MeSH Terms
Protein structure prediction guided by crosslinking restraints--A systematic evaluation of the impact of the crosslinking spacer length.
Hofmann T, Fischer AW, Meiler J, Kalkhof S
(2015) Methods 89: 79-90
MeSH Terms: Animals, Chromatography, Liquid, Cross-Linking Reagents, Forecasting, Horses, Protein Conformation, Protein Folding, Proteins, Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Show Abstract · Added February 5, 2016
Recent development of high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS) instruments enables chemical crosslinking (XL) to become a high-throughput method for obtaining structural information about proteins. Restraints derived from XL-MS experiments have been used successfully for structure refinement and protein-protein docking. However, one formidable question is under which circumstances XL-MS data might be sufficient to determine a protein's tertiary structure de novo? Answering this question will not only include understanding the impact of XL-MS data on sampling and scoring within a de novo protein structure prediction algorithm, it must also determine an optimal crosslinker type and length for protein structure determination. While a longer crosslinker will yield more restraints, the value of each restraint for protein structure prediction decreases as the restraint is consistent with a larger conformational space. In this study, the number of crosslinks and their discriminative power was systematically analyzed in silico on a set of 2055 non-redundant protein folds considering Lys-Lys, Lys-Asp, Lys-Glu, Cys-Cys, and Arg-Arg reactive crosslinkers between 1 and 60Å. Depending on the protein size a heuristic was developed that determines the optimal crosslinker length. Next, simulated restraints of variable length were used to de novo predict the tertiary structure of fifteen proteins using the BCL::Fold algorithm. The results demonstrate that a distinct crosslinker length exists for which information content for de novo protein structure prediction is maximized. The sampling accuracy improves on average by 1.0 Å and up to 2.2 Å in the most prominent example. XL-MS restraints enable consistently an improved selection of native-like models with an average enrichment of 2.1.
Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.
1 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
9 MeSH Terms
Site-specific, intramolecular cross-linking of Pin1 active site residues by the lipid electrophile 4-oxo-2-nonenal.
Aluise CD, Camarillo JM, Shimozu Y, Galligan JJ, Rose KL, Tallman KA, Marnett LJ
(2015) Chem Res Toxicol 28: 817-27
MeSH Terms: Aldehydes, Catalytic Domain, Cell Line, Tumor, Cross-Linking Reagents, Humans, NIMA-Interacting Peptidylprolyl Isomerase, Oxidative Stress, Peptidylprolyl Isomerase, Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization
Show Abstract · Added February 22, 2016
Products of oxidative damage to lipids include 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) and 4-oxo-2-nonenal (ONE), both of which are cytotoxic electrophiles. ONE reacts more rapidly with nucleophilic amino acid side chains, resulting in covalent protein adducts, including residue-residue cross-links. Previously, we demonstrated that peptidylprolyl cis/trans isomerase A1 (Pin1) was highly susceptible to adduction by HNE and that the catalytic cysteine (Cys113) was the preferential site of modification. Here, we show that ONE also preferentially adducts Pin1 at the catalytic Cys but results in a profoundly different modification. Results from experiments using purified Pin1 incubated with ONE revealed the principal product to be a Cys-Lys pyrrole-containing cross-link between the side chains of Cys113 and Lys117. In vitro competition assays between HNE and ONE demonstrate that ONE reacts more rapidly than HNE with Cys113. Exposure of RKO cells to alkynyl-ONE (aONE) followed by copper-mediated click chemistry and streptavidin purification revealed that Pin1 is also modified by ONE in cells. Analysis of the Pin1 crystal structure reveals that Cys113 and Lys117 are oriented toward each other in the active site, facilitating formation of an ONE cross-link.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
9 MeSH Terms
Functions of cholera toxin B-subunit as a raft cross-linker.
Day CA, Kenworthy AK
(2015) Essays Biochem 57: 135-45
MeSH Terms: Animals, Binding Sites, COS Cells, Cell Membrane, Cercopithecus aethiops, Cholera Toxin, Cross-Linking Reagents, Endocytosis, Humans, Membrane Microdomains, Models, Molecular, Protein Binding, Signal Transduction, Unilamellar Liposomes
Show Abstract · Added February 13, 2015
Lipid rafts are putative complexes of lipids and proteins in cellular membranes that are proposed to function in trafficking and signalling events. CTxB (cholera toxin B-subunit) has emerged as one of the most studied examples of a raft-associated protein. Consisting of the membrane-binding domain of cholera toxin, CTxB binds up to five copies of its lipid receptor on the plasma membrane of the host cell. This multivalency of binding gives the toxin the ability to reorganize underlying membrane structure by cross-linking otherwise small and transient lipid rafts. CTxB thus serves as a useful model for understanding the properties and functions of protein-stabilized domains. In the present chapter, we summarize current evidence that CTxB associates with and cross-links lipid rafts, discuss how CTxB binding modulates the architecture and dynamics of membrane domains, and describe the functional consequences of this cross-linking behaviour on toxin uptake into cells via endocytosis.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
14 MeSH Terms
Quantitative chemoproteomics for site-specific analysis of protein alkylation by 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal in cells.
Yang J, Tallman KA, Porter NA, Liebler DC
(2015) Anal Chem 87: 2535-41
MeSH Terms: Aldehydes, Alkylation, Chromatography, Liquid, Colorectal Neoplasms, Cross-Linking Reagents, Humans, Neoplasm Proteins, Protein Processing, Post-Translational, Tandem Mass Spectrometry, Tumor Cells, Cultured
Show Abstract · Added February 15, 2016
Protein alkylation by 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), an endogenous lipid derived electrophile, contributes to stress signaling and cellular toxicity. Although previous work has identified protein targets for HNE alkylation, the sequence specificity of alkylation and dynamics in a cellular context remain largely unexplored. We developed a new quantitative chemoproteomic platform, which uses isotopically tagged, photocleavable azido-biotin reagents to selectively capture and quantify the cellular targets labeled by the alkynyl analogue of HNE (aHNE). Our analyses site-specifically identified and quantified 398 aHNE protein alkylation events (386 cysteine sites and 12 histidine sites) in intact cells. This data set expands by at least an order of magnitude the number of such modification sites previously reported. Although adducts formed by Michael addition are thought to be largely irreversible, we found that most aHNE modifications are lost rapidly in situ. Moreover, aHNE adduct turnover occurs only in intact cells and loss rates are site-selective. This quantitative chemoproteomics platform provides a versatile general approach to map bioorthogonal-chemically engineered post-translational modifications and their cellular dynamics in a site-specific and unbiased manner.
0 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
10 MeSH Terms
Ion/ion reactions with "onium" reagents: an approach for the gas-phase transfer of organic cations to multiply-charged anions.
Gilbert JD, Prentice BM, McLuckey SA
(2015) J Am Soc Mass Spectrom 26: 818-25
MeSH Terms: Alkylation, CME-Carbodiimide, Catalysis, Chelating Agents, Cross-Linking Reagents, Edetic Acid, Energy Transfer, Hot Temperature, Indicators and Reagents, Models, Molecular, Oligopeptides, Organophosphorus Compounds, Protein Conformation, Quaternary Ammonium Compounds, Spectrometry, Mass, Electrospray Ionization, Static Electricity, Sulfonium Compounds, Tandem Mass Spectrometry, Tetraethylammonium, Volatilization
Show Abstract · Added August 17, 2016
The use of ion/ion reactions to effect gas-phase alkylation is demonstrated. Commonly used fixed-charge "onium" cations are well-suited for ion/ion reactions with multiply deprotonated analytes because of their tendency to form long-lived electrostatic complexes. Activation of these complexes results in an SN2 reaction that yields an alkylated anion with the loss of a neutral remnant of the reagent. This alkylation process forms the basis of a general method for alkylation of deprotonated analytes generated via electrospray, and is demonstrated on a variety of anionic sites. SN2 reactions of this nature are demonstrated empirically and characterized using density functional theory (DFT). This method for modification in the gas phase is extended to the transfer of larger and more complex R groups that can be used in later gas-phase synthesis steps. For example, N-cyclohexyl-N'-(2-morpholinoethyl)carbodiimide (CMC) is used to transfer a carbodiimide functionality to a peptide anion containing a carboxylic acid. Subsequent activation yields a selective reaction between the transferred carbodiimide group and a carboxylic acid, suggesting the carbodiimide functionality is retained through the transfer process. Many different R groups are transferable using this method, allowing for new possibilities for charge manipulation and derivatization in the gas phase.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
20 MeSH Terms
Synthesis of G-N2-(CH2)3-N2-G Trimethylene DNA Interstrand Cross-Links.
Gruppi F, Johnson Salyard TL, Rizzo CJ
(2014) Curr Protoc Nucleic Acid Chem 56: 5.14.1-15
MeSH Terms: Cross-Linking Reagents, Oligodeoxyribonucleotides
Show Abstract · Added January 7, 2016
The synthesis of G-N(2)-(CH(2))(3)-N(2)-G trimethylene DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs) in a 5'-CG-3' and 5'-GC-3' sequence from oligodeoxynucleotides containing N(2)-(3-aminopropyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine and 2-fluoro-O(6)-(trimethylsilylethyl)inosine is presented. Automated solid-phase DNA synthesis was used for unmodified bases and modified nucleotides were incorporated via their corresponding phosphoramidite reagent by a manual coupling protocol. The preparation of the phosphoramidite reagents for incorporation of N(2)-(3-aminopropyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine is reported. The high-purity trimethylene DNA interstrand cross-link product is obtained through a nucleophilic aromatic substitution reaction between the N(2)-(3-aminopropyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine- and 2-fluoro-O(6)-(trimethylsilylethyl)inosine-containing oligodeoxynucleotides.
Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
2 MeSH Terms