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Systematic review with meta-analysis: association between Helicobacter pylori CagA seropositivity and odds of inflammatory bowel disease.
Tepler A, Narula N, Peek RM, Patel A, Edelson C, Colombel JF, Shah SC
(2019) Aliment Pharmacol Ther 50: 121-131
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Antibodies, Bacterial, Antigens, Bacterial, Bacterial Proteins, Colitis, Ulcerative, Comorbidity, Crohn Disease, Female, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Humans, Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, Male, Middle Aged, Seroepidemiologic Studies, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
BACKGROUND - Accumulating data support a protective role of Helicobacter pylori against inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), which might be mediated by strain-specific constituents, specifically cagA expression.
AIM - To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis to more clearly define the association between CagA seropositivity and IBD.
METHODS - We identified comparative studies that included sufficient detail to determine the odds or risk of IBD, Crohn's disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC) amongst individuals with vs without evidence of cagA expression (eg CagA seropositivity). Estimates were pooled using a random effects model.
RESULTS - Three clinical studies met inclusion criteria. cagA expression was represented by CagA seropositivity in all studies. Compared to CagA seronegativity overall, CagA seropositivity was associated with lower odds of IBD (OR 0.31, 95% CI 0.21-0.44) and CD (OR 0.25, 95% CI 0.17-0.38), and statistically nonsignificant lower odds for UC (OR 0.68, 95% CI 0.35-1.32). Similarly, compared to H pylori non-exposed individuals, H pylori exposed, CagA seropositive individuals had lower odds of IBD (OR 0.26, 95% CI 0.16-0.41) and CD (OR 0.23, 95% CI 0.15-0.35), but not UC (OR 0.66, 0.34-1.27). However, there was no significant difference in the odds of IBD, CD or UC between H pylori exposed, CagA seronegative and H pylori non-exposed individuals.
CONCLUSION - We found evidence for a significant association between CagA seropositive H pylori exposure and reduced odds of IBD, particularly CD, but not for CagA seronegative H pylori exposure. Additional studies are needed to confirm these findings and define underlying mechanisms.
© 2019 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
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17 MeSH Terms
Serum Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Correlate with Serum Cytokines and Clinical Disease Activity in Crohn's Disease.
Scoville EA, Allaman MM, Adams DW, Motley AK, Peyton SC, Ferguson SL, Horst SN, Williams CS, Beaulieu DB, Schwartz DA, Wilson KT, Coburn LA
(2019) Sci Rep 9: 2882
MeSH Terms: Adipokines, Adult, Biomarkers, Case-Control Studies, Crohn Disease, Cytokines, Fatty Acids, Unsaturated, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Inflammation Mediators, Male, Middle Aged, Prognosis, Prospective Studies, Severity of Illness Index
Show Abstract · Added March 16, 2019
Crohn's disease (CD) has been associated with an increased consumption of n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), while greater intake of n-3 PUFA has been associated with a reduced risk. We sought to investigate serum fatty acid composition in CD, and associations of fatty acids with disease activity, cytokines, and adipokines. Serum was prospectively collected from 116 CD subjects and 27 non-IBD controls. Clinical disease activity was assessed by the Harvey Bradshaw Index (HBI). Serum fatty acids were measured by gas chromatography. Serum cytokines and adipokines were measured by Luminex assay. Dietary histories were obtained from a subset of patients. Nine serum cytokines and adipokines were increased in CD versus controls. CD subjects had increased percentage serum monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), dihomo-gamma linolenic acid (DGLA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosapentaenoic acid (DPA), and oleic acid, but decreased arachidonic acid (AA) versus controls. The % total n-3 fatty acids and % EPA directly correlated with pro-inflammatory cytokine levels and HBI, whereas the % total n-6 fatty acids were inversely correlated with pro-inflammatory cytokine levels and HBI. CD subjects had increased caloric intake versus controls, but no alterations in total fat or PUFA intake. We found differences in serum fatty acids, most notably PUFA, in CD that correlated both with clinical disease activity and inflammatory cytokines. Our findings indicate that altered fatty acid metabolism or utilization is present in CD and is related to disease activity.
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16 MeSH Terms
No Association Between Pseudopolyps and Colorectal Neoplasia in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.
Mahmoud R, Shah SC, Ten Hove JR, Torres J, Mooiweer E, Castaneda D, Glass J, Elman J, Kumar A, Axelrad J, Ullman T, Colombel JF, Oldenburg B, Itzkowitz SH, Dutch Initiative on Crohn and Colitis
(2019) Gastroenterology 156: 1333-1344.e3
MeSH Terms: Adult, Biopsy, Colectomy, Colitis, Ulcerative, Colonic Polyps, Colonoscopy, Colorectal Neoplasms, Crohn Disease, Early Detection of Cancer, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Neoplasm Grading, Netherlands, New York City, Prevalence, Retrospective Studies, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Time Factors
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
BACKGROUND & AIMS - Patients with inflammatory bowel diseases who have postinflammatory polyps (PIPs) have an increased risk of colorectal neoplasia (CRN). European guidelines propose that patients with PIPs receive more frequent surveillance colonoscopies, despite limited evidence of this increased risk. We aimed to define the risk of CRN and colectomy in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases and PIPs.
METHODS - We conducted a multicenter retrospective cohort study of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases who underwent colonoscopic surveillance for CRN, from January 1997 through January 2017, at 5 academic hospitals and 2 large nonacademic hospitals in New York or the Netherlands. Eligible patients had confirmed colonic disease with duration of at least 8 years (or any duration, if they also had primary sclerosing cholangitis) and no history of advanced CRN (high-grade dysplasia or colorectal cancer) or colectomy. The primary outcome was occurrence of advanced CRN according to PIP status; secondary outcomes were occurrence of CRN (inclusive of low-grade dysplasia) and colectomy.
RESULTS - Of 1582 eligible patients, 462 (29.2%) had PIPs. PIPs were associated with more severe inflammation (adjusted odds ratio 1.32; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13-1.55), greater disease extent (adjusted odds ratio 1.92; 95% CI 1.34-2.74), and lower likelihood of primary sclerosing cholangitis (adjusted odds ratio 0.38; 95% CI 0.26-0.55). During a median follow-up period of 4.8 years, the time until development of advanced CRN did not differ significantly between patients with and those without PIPs. PIPs did not independently increase the risk of advanced CRN (adjusted hazard ratio 1.17; 95% CI 0.59-2.31). The colectomy rate was significantly higher in patients with PIPs (P = .01).
CONCLUSIONS - In a retrospective analysis of data from 2 large independent surveillance cohorts, PIPs were associated with greater severity and extent of colon inflammation and higher rates of colectomy, but were not associated with development of any degree of CRN. Therefore, intervals for surveillance should not be shortened based solely on the presence of PIPs.
Copyright © 2019 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Sex-Based Differences in Incidence of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases-Pooled Analysis of Population-Based Studies From Western Countries.
Shah SC, Khalili H, Gower-Rousseau C, Olen O, Benchimol EI, Lynge E, Nielsen KR, Brassard P, Vutcovici M, Bitton A, Bernstein CN, Leddin D, Tamim H, Stefansson T, Loftus EV, Moum B, Tang W, Ng SC, Gearry R, Sincic B, Bell S, Sands BE, Lakatos PL, Végh Z, Ott C, Kaplan GG, Burisch J, Colombel JF
(2018) Gastroenterology 155: 1079-1089.e3
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Age Distribution, Age of Onset, Aged, Australia, Child, Child, Preschool, Colitis, Ulcerative, Crohn Disease, Europe, Female, Humans, Incidence, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Male, Middle Aged, New Zealand, North America, Risk Factors, Sex Distribution, Sex Factors, Time Factors, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
BACKGROUND & AIMS - Although the incidence of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) varies with age, few studies have examined variations between the sexes. We therefore used population data from established cohorts to analyze sex differences in IBD incidence according to age at diagnosis.
METHODS - We identified population-based cohorts of patients with IBD for which incidence and age data were available (17 distinct cohorts from 16 regions of Europe, North America, Australia, and New Zealand). We collected data through December 2016 on 95,605 incident cases of Crohn's disease (CD) (42,831 male and 52,774 female) and 112,004 incident cases of ulcerative colitis (UC) (61,672 male and 50,332 female). We pooled incidence rate ratios of CD and UC for the combined cohort and compared differences according to sex using random effects meta-analysis.
RESULTS - Female patients had a lower risk of CD during childhood, until the age range of 10-14 years (incidence rate ratio, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.53-0.93), but they had a higher risk of CD thereafter, which was statistically significant for the age groups of 25-29 years and older than 35 years. The incidence of UC did not differ significantly for female vs male patients (except for the age group of 5-9 years) until age 45 years; thereafter, men had a significantly higher incidence of ulcerative colitis than women.
CONCLUSIONS - In a pooled analysis of population-based studies, we found age at IBD onset to vary with sex. Further studies are needed to investigate mechanisms of sex differences in IBD incidence.
Copyright © 2018 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Human alpha defensin 5 is a candidate biomarker to delineate inflammatory bowel disease.
Williams AD, Korolkova OY, Sakwe AM, Geiger TM, James SD, Muldoon RL, Herline AJ, Goodwin JS, Izban MG, Washington MK, Smoot DT, Ballard BR, Gazouli M, M'Koma AE
(2017) PLoS One 12: e0179710
MeSH Terms: Biomarkers, Biopsy, Colitis, Ulcerative, Crohn Disease, Diagnosis, Differential, Gene Expression Profiling, Humans, Immunohistochemistry, Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, Intestinal Mucosa, Muramidase, Proctocolectomy, Restorative, Retrospective Studies, alpha-Defensins
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Inability to distinguish Crohn's colitis from ulcerative colitis leads to the diagnosis of indeterminate colitis. This greatly effects medical and surgical care of the patient because treatments for the two diseases vary. Approximately 30 percent of inflammatory bowel disease patients cannot be accurately diagnosed, increasing their risk of inappropriate treatment. We sought to determine whether transcriptomic patterns could be used to develop diagnostic biomarker(s) to delineate inflammatory bowel disease more accurately. Four patients groups were assessed via whole-transcriptome microarray, qPCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry for differential expression of Human α-Defensin-5. In addition, immunohistochemistry for Paneth cells and Lysozyme, a Paneth cell marker, was also performed. Aberrant expression of Human α-Defensin-5 levels using transcript, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry staining levels was significantly upregulated in Crohn's colitis, p< 0.0001. Among patients with indeterminate colitis, Human α-Defensin-5 is a reliable differentiator with a positive predictive value of 96 percent. We also observed abundant ectopic crypt Paneth cells in all colectomy tissue samples of Crohn's colitis patients. In a retrospective study, we show that Human α-Defensin-5 could be used in indeterminate colitis patients to determine if they have either ulcerative colitis (low levels of Human α-Defensin-5) or Crohn's colitis (high levels of Human α-Defensin-5). Twenty of 67 patients (30 percent) who underwent restorative proctocolectomy for definitive ulcerative colitis were clinically changed to de novo Crohn's disease. These patients were profiled by Human α-Defensin-5 immunohistochemistry. All patients tested strongly positive. In addition, we observed by both hematoxylin and eosin and Lysozyme staining, a large number of ectopic Paneth cells in the colonic crypt of Crohn's colitis patient samples. Our experiments are the first to show that Human α-Defensin-5 is a potential candidate biomarker to molecularly differentiate Crohn's colitis from ulcerative colitis, to our knowledge. These data give us both a potential diagnostic marker in Human α-Defensin-5 and insight to develop future mechanistic studies to better understand crypt biology in Crohn's colitis.
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14 MeSH Terms
Mucosal Expression of Type 2 and Type 17 Immune Response Genes Distinguishes Ulcerative Colitis From Colon-Only Crohn's Disease in Treatment-Naive Pediatric Patients.
Rosen MJ, Karns R, Vallance JE, Bezold R, Waddell A, Collins MH, Haberman Y, Minar P, Baldassano RN, Hyams JS, Baker SS, Kellermayer R, Noe JD, Griffiths AM, Rosh JR, Crandall WV, Heyman MB, Mack DR, Kappelman MD, Markowitz J, Moulton DE, Leleiko NS, Walters TD, Kugathasan S, Wilson KT, Hogan SP, Denson LA
(2017) Gastroenterology 152: 1345-1357.e7
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Area Under Curve, Case-Control Studies, Child, Colitis, Ulcerative, Colon, Crohn Disease, Female, Gene Expression, Humans, Immunity, Mucosal, Interleukin-13, Interleukin-13 Receptor alpha2 Subunit, Interleukin-17, Interleukin-23, Interleukin-5, Interleukins, Intestinal Mucosa, Male, Predictive Value of Tests, Prognosis, Prospective Studies, RNA, Messenger, ROC Curve, Rectum, Transcriptome, Up-Regulation
Show Abstract · Added January 31, 2017
BACKGROUND & AIMS - There is controversy regarding the role of the type 2 immune response in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis (UC)-few data are available from treatment-naive patients. We investigated whether genes associated with a type 2 immune response in the intestinal mucosa are up-regulated in treatment-naive pediatric patients with UC compared with patients with Crohn's disease (CD)-associated colitis or without inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and whether expression levels are associated with clinical outcomes.
METHODS - We used a real-time reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction array to analyze messenger RNA (mRNA) expression patterns in rectal mucosal samples from 138 treatment-naive pediatric patients with IBD and macroscopic rectal disease, as well as those from 49 children without IBD (controls), enrolled in a multicenter prospective observational study from 2008 to 2012. Results were validated in real-time reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses of rectal RNA from an independent cohort of 34 pediatric patients with IBD and macroscopic rectal disease and 17 controls from Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center.
RESULTS - We measured significant increases in mRNAs associated with a type 2 immune response (interleukin [IL]5 gene, IL13, and IL13RA2) and a type 17 immune response (IL17A and IL23) in mucosal samples from patients with UC compared with patients with colon-only CD. In a regression model, increased expression of IL5 and IL17A mRNAs distinguished patients with UC from patients with colon-only CD (P = .001; area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, 0.72). We identified a gene expression pattern in rectal tissues of patients with UC, characterized by detection of IL13 mRNA, that predicted clinical response to therapy after 6 months (odds ratio [OR], 6.469; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.553-26.94), clinical response after 12 months (OR, 6.125; 95% CI, 1.330-28.22), and remission after 12 months (OR, 5.333; 95% CI, 1.132-25.12).
CONCLUSIONS - In an analysis of rectal tissues from treatment-naive pediatric patients with IBD, we observed activation of a type 2 immune response during the early course of UC. We were able to distinguish patients with UC from those with colon-only CD based on increased mucosal expression of genes that mediate type 2 and type 17 immune responses. Increased expression at diagnosis of genes that mediate a type 2 immune response is associated with response to therapy and remission in pediatric patients with UC.
Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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27 MeSH Terms
L-Arginine Availability and Metabolism Is Altered in Ulcerative Colitis.
Coburn LA, Horst SN, Allaman MM, Brown CT, Williams CS, Hodges ME, Druce JP, Beaulieu DB, Schwartz DA, Wilson KT
(2016) Inflamm Bowel Dis 22: 1847-58
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Transport Systems, Basic, Amino Acids, Arginase, Arginine, Biological Availability, Case-Control Studies, Citrulline, Clinical Trials as Topic, Colitis, Ulcerative, Colon, Crohn Disease, Diet Records, Humans, Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II, Prospective Studies, RNA, Messenger, Severity of Illness Index
Show Abstract · Added April 24, 2016
BACKGROUND - L-arginine (L-Arg) is the substrate for both inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS2) and arginase (ARG) enzymes. L-Arg is actively transported into cells by means of cationic amino acid transporter (SLC7) proteins. We have linked L-Arg and arginase 1 activity to epithelial restitution. Our aim was to determine if L-Arg, related amino acids, and metabolic enzymes are altered in ulcerative colitis (UC).
METHODS - Serum and colonic tissues were prospectively collected from 38 control subjects and 137 UC patients. Dietary intake, histologic injury, and clinical disease activity were assessed. Amino acid levels were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. Messenger RNA (mRNA) levels were measured by real-time PCR. Colon tissue samples from 12 Crohn's disease patients were obtained for comparison.
RESULTS - Dietary intake of arginine and serum L-Arg levels were not different in UC patients versus control subjects. In active UC, tissue L-Arg was decreased, whereas L-citrulline (L-Cit) and the L-Cit/L-Arg ratio were increased. This pattern was also seen when paired involved (left) versus uninvolved (right) colon tissues in UC were assessed. In active UC, SLC7A2 and ARG1 mRNA levels were decreased, whereas ARG2 and NOS2 were increased. Similar alterations in mRNA expression occurred in tissues from Crohn's disease patients. In involved UC, SLC7A2 and ARG1 mRNA levels were decreased, and NOS2 and ARG2 increased, when compared with uninvolved tissues.
CONCLUSIONS - Patients with UC exhibit diminished tissue L-Arg, likely attributable to decreased cellular uptake and increased consumption by NOS2. These findings combined with decreased ARG1 expression indicate a pattern of dysregulated L-Arg availability and metabolism in UC.
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17 MeSH Terms
Proteolytic cleavage and loss of function of biologic agents that neutralize tumor necrosis factor in the mucosa of patients with inflammatory bowel disease.
Biancheri P, Brezski RJ, Di Sabatino A, Greenplate AR, Soring KL, Corazza GR, Kok KB, Rovedatti L, Vossenkämper A, Ahmad N, Snoek SA, Vermeire S, Rutgeerts P, Jordan RE, MacDonald TT
(2015) Gastroenterology 149: 1564-1574.e3
MeSH Terms: Adalimumab, Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized, Biological Factors, Biopsy, Case-Control Studies, Colitis, Ulcerative, Colon, Crohn Disease, Epitopes, Etanercept, Female, Humans, Immunoblotting, Immunoglobulin G, Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, Infliximab, Intestinal Mucosa, Male, Matrix Metalloproteinase 12, Matrix Metalloproteinase 3, Middle Aged, Proteolysis, Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Show Abstract · Added April 22, 2016
BACKGROUND & AIMS - Many patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) fail to respond to anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agents such as infliximab and adalimumab, and etanercept is not effective for treatment of Crohn's disease. Activated matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP3) and MMP12, which are increased in inflamed mucosa of patients with IBD, have a wide range of substrates, including IgG1. TNF-neutralizing agents act in inflamed tissues; we investigated the effects of MMP3, MMP12, and mucosal proteins from IBD patients on these drugs.
METHODS - Biopsy specimens from inflamed colon of 8 patients with Crohn's disease and 8 patients with ulcerative colitis, and from normal colon of 8 healthy individuals (controls), were analyzed histologically, or homogenized and proteins were extracted. We also analyzed sera from 29 patients with active Crohn's disease and 33 patients with active ulcerative colitis who were candidates to receive infliximab treatment. Infliximab, adalimumab, and etanercept were incubated with mucosal homogenates from patients with IBD or activated recombinant human MMP3 or MMP12 and analyzed on immunoblots or in luciferase reporter assays designed to measure TNF activity. IgG cleaved by MMP3 or MMP12 and antihinge autoantibodies against neo-epitopes on cleaved IgG were measured in sera from IBD patients who subsequently responded (clinical remission and complete mucosal healing) or did not respond to infliximab.
RESULTS - MMP3 and MMP12 cleaved infliximab, adalimumab, and etanercept, releasing a 32-kilodalton Fc monomer. After MMP degradation, infliximab and adalimumab functioned as F(ab')2 fragments, whereas cleaved etanercept lost its ability to neutralize TNF. Proteins from the mucosa of patients with IBD reduced the integrity and function of infliximab, adalimumab, and etanercept. TNF-neutralizing function was restored after incubation of the drugs with MMP inhibitors. Serum levels of endogenous IgG cleaved by MMP3 and MMP12, and antihinge autoantibodies against neo-epitopes of cleaved IgG, were higher in patients who did not respond to treatment vs responders.
CONCLUSIONS - Proteolytic degradation may contribute to the nonresponsiveness of patients with IBD to anti-TNF agents.
Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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23 MeSH Terms
Identification of pathologic features associated with "ulcerative colitis-like" Crohn's disease.
James SD, Wise PE, Zuluaga-Toro T, Schwartz DA, Washington MK, Shi C
(2014) World J Gastroenterol 20: 13139-45
MeSH Terms: Adult, Colitis, Ulcerative, Colon, Colonic Pouches, Crohn Disease, Female, Humans, Ileum, Intestinal Mucosa, Male, Middle Aged, Neutrophils, Predictive Value of Tests, Proctocolectomy, Restorative, Retrospective Studies, Risk Factors, Severity of Illness Index, Treatment Outcome, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added April 12, 2016
AIM - To identify pathologic features associated with this "ulcerative colitis (UC)-like" subgroup of Crohn's disease (CD).
METHODS - Seventeen subjects diagnosed as having UC who underwent proctocolectomy (RPC) from 2003-2007 and subsequently developed CD of the ileal pouch were identified. UC was diagnosed based on pre-operative clinical, endoscopic, and pathologic studies. Eighteen patients who underwent RPC for UC within the same time period without subsequently developing CD were randomly selected and used as controls. Pathology reports and histological slides were reviewed for a wide range of gross and microscopic pathological features, as well as extent of disease. The demographics, gross description and histopathology of the resection specimens were reviewed and compared between the two groups.
RESULTS - Patients with "UC-like" CD were on average 13 years younger than those with "true" UC (P < 0.01). More severe disease in the proximal involved region and active ileitis with/without architectural distortion were observed in 6 of 17 (35%) and 7 of 17 (41%) "UC-like" CD cases, respectively, but in none of the "true" UC cases (P < 0.05). Active appendicitis occurred in 8 of 16 (50%) "UC-like" CD cases but in only two (11%) "true" UC cases (P < 0.05). Conspicuous lamina propria neutrophils were more specific for "UC-like" CD (76% vs 22%, P < 0.05). In addition, prominent lymphoid aggregates tended to be more common in "UC-like" CD (P = 0.07). The "true" UC group contained a greater number of cases with severe activity (78% vs 47%). Therefore, the features more commonly seen in "UC-like" CD were not due to a more severe disease process. Crohn's granulomas and transmural inflammation in non-ulcerated areas were absent in both groups.
CONCLUSION - More severe disease in the proximal involved region, terminal ileum involvement, active appendicitis, and prominent lamina propria neutrophils may be morphological factors associated with "UC-like" CD.
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19 MeSH Terms
Treatment with immunosuppressive therapy may improve depressive symptoms in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.
Horst S, Chao A, Rosen M, Nohl A, Duley C, Wagnon JH, Beaulieu DB, Taylor W, Gaines L, Schwartz DA
(2015) Dig Dis Sci 60: 465-70
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Colitis, Ulcerative, Crohn Disease, Depression, Female, Humans, Immunosuppressive Agents, Male, Middle Aged, Predictive Value of Tests, Psychiatric Status Rating Scales, Retrospective Studies, Risk Factors, Severity of Illness Index, Surveys and Questionnaires, Time Factors, Treatment Outcome, Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added February 4, 2016
INTRODUCTION - Recent research suggests a relationship of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and depression. Our objective was to evaluate for improvement of depressive symptoms with treatment of IBD using immunosuppressive medications.
METHODS - A retrospective study of consecutive patients with IBD started on immunosuppressive agents [anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) or immunomodulator therapy] was conducted. Patients were evaluated if disease activity indices using Harvey Bradshaw Index for Crohn's disease (CD) and Simple Clinical Colitis Disease Activity Index for ulcerative colitis (UC) and depressive indices using Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) scores were obtained before and at least 30 days after initiation of therapy.
RESULTS - Sixteen patients with UC and 53 patients with CD (all with active disease symptoms) were evaluated over a 60 day median follow-up evaluation (range 30, 140 days). Twenty-two patients started on immunomodulator therapy, and 47 patients started on anti-TNF therapy. Crohn's disease patients had significantly decreased PHQ-9 scores at follow-up [median 9 (range 3, 14) to 4 (1, 8)], with significant decreases only in those started on anti-TNF therapy. Changes in PHQ-9 and CRP were correlated (ρ = 0.38, p < 0.05). In patients with UC, PHQ-9 scores [5 (3, 9) to 2 (0, 5)] were significantly decreased. Percentage at risk of moderate to severe depression (PHQ-9 scores ≥10) was lower after treatment [Crohn's disease 51-18 % (p < 0.05), ulcerative colitis 18-0 %].
CONCLUSION - Depressive scores decreased significantly in patients with IBD treated with immunosuppressive therapy and the number at risk for moderate to severe depression improved significantly.
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21 MeSH Terms