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Delirium Monitoring in Neurocritically Ill Patients: A Systematic Review.
Patel MB, Bednarik J, Lee P, Shehabi Y, Salluh JI, Slooter AJ, Klein KE, Skrobik Y, Morandi A, Spronk PE, Naidech AM, Pun BT, Bozza FA, Marra A, John S, Pandharipande PP, Ely EW
(2018) Crit Care Med 46: 1832-1841
MeSH Terms: Critical Care, Critical Illness, Delirium, Female, Humans, Intensive Care Units, Male, Nervous System Diseases, Prospective Studies, Risk Assessment
Show Abstract · Added August 25, 2018
OBJECTIVES - The Society of Critical Care Medicine recommends routine delirium monitoring, based on data in critically ill patients without primary neurologic injury. We sought to answer whether there are valid and reliable tools to monitor delirium in neurocritically ill patients and whether delirium is associated with relevant clinical outcomes (e.g., survival, length of stay, functional independence, cognition) in this population.
DATA SOURCES - We systematically reviewed Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Web of Science, and PubMed.
STUDY SELECTION AND DATA EXTRACTION - Inclusion criteria allowed any study design investigating delirium monitoring in neurocritically ill patients (e.g., neurotrauma, ischemic, and/or hemorrhagic stroke) of any age. We extracted data relevant to delirium tool sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, positive predictive value, interrater reliability, and associated clinical outcomes.
DATA SYNTHESIS - Among seven prospective cohort studies and a total of 1,173 patients, delirium was assessed in neurocritically patients using validated delirium tools after considering primary neurologic diagnoses and associated complications, finding a pooled prevalence rate of 12-43%. When able to compare against a common reference standard, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, the test characteristics showed a sensitivity of 62-76%, specificity of 74-98%, positive predictive value of 63-91%, negative predictive value of 70-94%, and reliability kappa of 0.64-0.94. Among four studies reporting multivariable analyses, delirium in neurocritically patients was associated with increased hospital length of stay (n = 3) and ICU length of stay (n = 1), as well as worse functional independence (n = 1) and cognition (n = 2), but not survival.
CONCLUSIONS - These data from studies of neurocritically ill patients demonstrate that patients with primary neurologic diagnoses can meet diagnostic criteria for delirium and that delirious features may predict relevant untoward clinical outcomes. There is a need for ongoing investigations regarding delirium in these complicated neurocritically ill patients.
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10 MeSH Terms
Co-Occurrence of Post-Intensive Care Syndrome Problems Among 406 Survivors of Critical Illness.
Marra A, Pandharipande PP, Girard TD, Patel MB, Hughes CG, Jackson JC, Thompson JL, Chandrasekhar R, Ely EW, Brummel NE
(2018) Crit Care Med 46: 1393-1401
MeSH Terms: Activities of Daily Living, Aged, Cognitive Dysfunction, Critical Care, Critical Illness, Depression, Disability Evaluation, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Prospective Studies, Respiratory Insufficiency, Shock, Syndrome
Show Abstract · Added June 26, 2018
OBJECTIVES - To describe the frequency of co-occurring newly acquired cognitive impairment, disability in activities of daily livings, and depression among survivors of a critical illness and to evaluate predictors of being free of post-intensive care syndrome problems.
DESIGN - Prospective cohort study.
SETTING - Medical and surgical ICUs from five U.S. centers.
PATIENTS - Patients with respiratory failure or shock, excluding those with preexisting cognitive impairment or disability in activities of daily livings.
INTERVENTIONS - None.
MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS - At 3 and 12 months after hospital discharge, we assessed patients for cognitive impairment, disability, and depression. We categorized patients into eight groups reflecting combinations of cognitive, disability, and mental health problems. Using multivariable logistic regression, we modeled the association between age, education, frailty, durations of mechanical ventilation, delirium, and severe sepsis with the odds of being post-intensive care syndrome free. We analyzed 406 patients with a median age of 61 years and an Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II of 23. At 3 and 12 months, one or more post-intensive care syndrome problems were present in 64% and 56%, respectively. Nevertheless, co-occurring post-intensive care syndrome problems (i.e., in two or more domains) were present in 25% at 3 months and 21% at 12 months. Post-intensive care syndrome problems in all three domains were present in only 6% at 3 months and 4% at 12 months. More years of education was associated with greater odds of being post-intensive care syndrome free (p < 0.001 at 3 and 12 mo). More severe frailty was associated with lower odds of being post-intensive care syndrome free (p = 0.005 at 3 mo and p = 0.048 at 12 mo).
CONCLUSIONS - In this multicenter cohort study, one or more post-intensive care syndrome problems were present in the majority of survivors, but co-occurring problems were present in only one out of four. Education was protective from post-intensive care syndrome problems and frailty predictive of the development of post-intensive care syndrome problems. Future studies are needed to understand better the heterogeneous subtypes of post-intensive care syndrome and to identify modifiable risk factors.
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Antioxidant supplementation and atrial arrhythmias in critically ill trauma patients.
Mirhoseini MF, Hamblin SE, Moore WP, Pouliot J, Jenkins JM, Wang W, Chandrasekhar R, Collier BR, Patel MB
(2018) J Surg Res 222: 10-16
MeSH Terms: Adult, Antioxidants, Arrhythmias, Cardiac, Ascorbic Acid, Critical Care, Critical Illness, Dietary Supplements, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Oxidative Stress, Retrospective Studies, Selenium, Trauma Centers, Vitamin D, Wounds and Injuries
Show Abstract · Added June 26, 2018
BACKGROUND - The purpose of this study is to determine if antioxidant supplementation influences the incidence of atrial arrhythmias in trauma intensive care unit (ICU) patients.
MATERIALS AND METHODS - In this retrospective pre-post study, critically ill injured patients aged ≥18 years, admitted to a single-center trauma ICU for ≥48 hours were eligible for inclusion. The control group consists of patients admitted from January 2000 to September 2005, before routine antioxidant supplementation in our ICU. The antioxidant group consists of patients admitted from October 2005 to June 2011 who received an antioxidant protocol for ≥48 hours. The primary outcome is the incidence of atrial arrhythmias in the first 2 weeks of hospitalization or before discharge.
RESULTS - Of the 4699 patients, 1622 patients were in the antioxidant group and 2414 patients were in the control group. Adjusted for age, sex, year, injury severity, past medical history, and medication administration, the unadjusted incidence of atrial arrhythmias was 3.02% in the antioxidant group versus 3.31% in the control group, with no adjusted difference in atrial arrhythmias among those exposed to antioxidants (odds ratio: 1.31 [95% confidence interval: 0.46, 3.75], P = 0.62). Although there was no change in overall mortality, the expected adjusted survival of patients in those without antioxidant therapy was lower (odds ratio: 0.65 [95% confidence interval: 0.43, 0.97], P = 0.04).
CONCLUSIONS - ICU antioxidant supplementation did not decrease the incidence of atrial arrhythmias, nor alter the time from admission to development of arrhythmia. A longer expected survival time was observed in the antioxidant group compared with the control group but without a change in overall mortality between groups.
Published by Elsevier Inc.
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17 MeSH Terms
Intensive Care Unit Delirium and Intensive Care Unit-Related Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.
Marra A, Pandharipande PP, Patel MB
(2017) Surg Clin North Am 97: 1215-1235
MeSH Terms: Antipsychotic Agents, Brain Diseases, Cognition Disorders, Conscious Sedation, Critical Care, Critical Illness, Delirium, Early Ambulation, Exercise Therapy, Family, Humans, Pain Measurement, Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic, Ventilator Weaning
Show Abstract · Added June 26, 2018
Delirium is one of the most common behavioral manifestations of acute brain dysfunction in the intensive care unit (ICU) and is a strong predictor of worse outcome. Routine monitoring for delirium is recommended for all ICU patients using validated tools. In delirious patients, a search for all reversible precipitants is the first line of action and pharmacologic treatment should be considered when all causes have been ruled out, and it is not contraindicated. Long-term morbidity has significant consequences for survivors of critical illness and for their caregivers. ICU patients may develop posttraumatic stress disorder related to their critical illness experience.
Published by Elsevier Inc.
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The ABCDEF Bundle in Critical Care.
Marra A, Ely EW, Pandharipande PP, Patel MB
(2017) Crit Care Clin 33: 225-243
MeSH Terms: Critical Care, Critical Illness, Humans, Intensive Care Units, Patient Care Bundles, Patient Care Team
Show Abstract · Added June 26, 2018
The ABCDEF bundle represents an evidence-based guide for clinicians to approach the organizational changes needed for optimizing intensive care unit patient recovery and outcomes. This article reviews the core evidence and features behind the ABCDEF bundle. The bundle has individual components that are clearly defined, flexible to implement, and help empower multidisciplinary clinicians and families in the shared care of the critically ill. The ABCDEF bundle helps guide well-rounded patient care and optimal resource utilization resulting in more interactive intensive care unit patients with better controlled pain, who can safely participate in higher-order physical and cognitive activities at the earliest point in their critical illness.
Published by Elsevier Inc.
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Procalcitonin as an Early Marker of the Need for Invasive Respiratory or Vasopressor Support in Adults With Community-Acquired Pneumonia.
Self WH, Grijalva CG, Williams DJ, Woodworth A, Balk RA, Fakhran S, Zhu Y, Courtney DM, Chappell J, Anderson EJ, Qi C, Waterer GW, Trabue C, Bramley AM, Jain S, Edwards KM, Wunderink RG
(2016) Chest 150: 819-828
MeSH Terms: Aged, Biomarkers, Calcitonin, Cohort Studies, Community-Acquired Infections, Critical Care, Female, Humans, Logistic Models, Male, Middle Aged, Pneumonia, Prognosis, Prospective Studies, Respiration, Artificial, Respiratory Insufficiency, Risk Assessment, Severity of Illness Index, Shock, Septic, Vasoconstrictor Agents
Show Abstract · Added July 27, 2018
BACKGROUND - Predicting the need for intensive care among adults with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) remains challenging.
METHODS - Using a multicenter prospective cohort study of adults hospitalized with CAP, we evaluated the association of serum procalcitonin (PCT) concentration at hospital presentation with the need for invasive respiratory or vasopressor support (IRVS), or both, within 72 h. Logistic regression was used to model this association, with results reported as the estimated risk of IRVS for a given PCT concentration. We also assessed whether the addition of PCT changed the performance of established pneumonia severity scores, including the pneumonia severity index and the American Thoracic Society minor criteria, for prediction of IRVS.
RESULTS - Of 1,770 enrolled patients, 115 required IRVS (6.5%). Using the logistic regression model, PCT concentration had a strong association with IRVS risk. Undetectable PCT (< 0.05 ng/mL) was associated with a 4% (95% CI, 3.1%-5.1%) risk of IRVS. For concentrations < 10 ng/mL, PCT had an approximate linear association with IRVS risk: for each 1 ng/mL increase in PCT, there was a 1% to 2% absolute increase in the risk of IRVS. With a PCT concentration of 10 ng/mL, the risk of IRVS was 22.4% (95% CI, 16.3%-30.1%) and remained relatively constant for all concentrations > 10 ng/mL. When added to each pneumonia severity score, PCT contributed significant additional risk information for the prediction of IRVS.
CONCLUSIONS - Serum PCT concentration was strongly associated with the risk of requiring IRVS among adults hospitalized with CAP and is potentially useful for guiding decisions about ICU admission.
Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. All rights reserved.
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Incidence and Risk Factors for Intensive Care Unit-related Post-traumatic Stress Disorder in Veterans and Civilians.
Patel MB, Jackson JC, Morandi A, Girard TD, Hughes CG, Thompson JL, Kiehl AL, Elstad MR, Wasserstein ML, Goodman RB, Beckham JC, Chandrasekhar R, Dittus RS, Ely EW, Pandharipande PP
(2016) Am J Respir Crit Care Med 193: 1373-81
MeSH Terms: Aged, Cohort Studies, Critical Care, Critical Illness, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Hospitalization, Humans, Incidence, Intensive Care Units, Male, Middle Aged, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors, Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic, Survivors, Veterans
Show Abstract · Added June 14, 2016
RATIONALE - The incidence and risk factors of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) related to the intensive care unit (ICU) experience have not been reported in a mixed veteran and civilian cohort.
OBJECTIVES - To describe the incidence and risk factors for ICU-related PTSD in veterans and civilians.
METHODS - This is a prospective, observational, multicenter cohort enrolling adult survivors of critical illness after respiratory failure and/or shock from three Veterans Affairs and one civilian hospital. After classifying those with/without preexisting PTSD (i.e., PTSD before hospitalization), we then assessed all subjects for ICU-related PTSD at 3 and 12 months post hospitalization.
MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS - Of 255 survivors, 181 and 160 subjects were assessed for ICU-related PTSD at 3- and 12-month follow-up, respectively. A high probability of ICU-related PTSD was found in up to 10% of patients at either follow-up time point, whether assessed by PTSD Checklist Event-Specific Version (score ≥ 50) or item mapping using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV (DSM-IV). In the multivariable regression, preexisting PTSD was independently associated with ICU-related PTSD at both 3 and 12 months (P < 0.001), as was preexisting depression (P < 0.03), but veteran status was not a consistent independent risk factor for ICU-related PTSD (3-month P = 0.01, 12-month P = 0.48).
CONCLUSIONS - This study found around 1 in 10 ICU survivors experienced ICU-related PTSD (i.e., PTSD anchored to their critical illness) in the year after hospitalization. Preexisting PTSD and depression were strongly associated with ICU-related PTSD.
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Standardizing ICU management of pediatric traumatic brain injury is associated with improved outcomes at discharge.
O'Lynnger TM, Shannon CN, Le TM, Greeno A, Chung D, Lamb FS, Wellons JC
(2016) J Neurosurg Pediatr 17: 19-26
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Brain Injuries, Child, Child, Preschool, Clinical Protocols, Critical Care, Female, Glasgow Outcome Scale, Humans, Infant, Intensive Care Units, Pediatric, Male, Outcome Assessment (Health Care), Patient Discharge, Practice Guidelines as Topic, Retrospective Studies
Show Abstract · Added February 22, 2016
OBJECT The goal of critical care in treating traumatic brain injury (TBI) is to reduce secondary brain injury by limiting cerebral ischemia and optimizing cerebral blood flow. The authors compared short-term outcomes as defined by discharge disposition and Glasgow Outcome Scale scores in children with TBI before and after the implementation of a protocol that standardized decision-making and interventions among neurosurgeons and pediatric intensivists. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective pre- and postprotocol study of 128 pediatric patients with severe TBI, as defined by Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores < 8, admitted to a tertiary care center pediatric critical care unit between April 1, 2008, and May 31, 2014. The preprotocol group included 99 patients, and the postprotocol group included 29 patients. The primary outcome of interest was discharge disposition before and after protocol implementation, which took place on April 1, 2013. Ordered logistic regression was used to assess outcomes while accounting for injury severity and clinical parameters. Favorable discharge disposition included discharge home. Unfavorable discharge disposition included discharge to an inpatient facility or death. RESULTS Demographics were similar between the treatment periods, as was injury severity as assessed by GCS score (mean 5.43 preprotocol, mean 5.28 postprotocol; p = 0.67). The ordered logistic regression model demonstrated an odds ratio of 4.0 of increasingly favorable outcome in the postprotocol cohort (p = 0.007). Prior to protocol implementation, 63 patients (64%) had unfavorable discharge disposition and 36 patients (36%) had favorable discharge disposition. After protocol implementation, 9 patients (31%) had unfavorable disposition, while 20 patients (69%) had favorable disposition (p = 0.002). In the preprotocol group, 31 patients (31%) died while 6 patients (21%) died after protocol implementation (p = 0.04). CONCLUSIONS Discharge disposition and mortality rates in pediatric patients with severe TBI improved after implementation of a standardized protocol among caregivers based on best-practice guidelines.
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Protocols and Hospital Mortality in Critically Ill Patients: The United States Critical Illness and Injury Trials Group Critical Illness Outcomes Study.
Sevransky JE, Checkley W, Herrera P, Pickering BW, Barr J, Brown SM, Chang SY, Chong D, Kaufman D, Fremont RD, Girard TD, Hoag J, Johnson SB, Kerlin MP, Liebler J, O'Brien J, O'Keefe T, Park PK, Pastores SM, Patil N, Pietropaoli AP, Putman M, Rice TW, Rotello L, Siner J, Sajid S, Murphy DJ, Martin GS, United States Critical Illness and Injury Trials Group-Critical Illness Outcomes Study Investigators
(2015) Crit Care Med 43: 2076-84
MeSH Terms: Clinical Protocols, Critical Care, Critical Illness, Female, Hospital Mortality, Humans, Intensive Care Units, Male, Middle Aged, Patient Outcome Assessment, Prospective Studies, United States
Show Abstract · Added September 23, 2015
OBJECTIVE - Clinical protocols may decrease unnecessary variation in care and improve compliance with desirable therapies. We evaluated whether highly protocolized ICUs have superior patient outcomes compared with less highly protocolized ICUs.
DESIGN - Observational study in which participating ICUs completed a general assessment and enrolled new patients 1 day each week.
PATIENTS - A total of 6,179 critically ill patients.
SETTING - Fifty-nine ICUs in the United States Critical Illness and Injury Trials Group Critical Illness Outcomes Study.
INTERVENTIONS - None.
MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS - The primary exposure was the number of ICU protocols; the primary outcome was hospital mortality. A total of 5,809 participants were followed prospectively, and 5,454 patients in 57 ICUs had complete outcome data. The median number of protocols per ICU was 19 (interquartile range, 15-21.5). In single-variable analyses, there were no differences in ICU and hospital mortality, length of stay, use of mechanical ventilation, vasopressors, or continuous sedation among individuals in ICUs with a high versus low number of protocols. The lack of association was confirmed in adjusted multivariable analysis (p = 0.70). Protocol compliance with two ventilator management protocols was moderate and did not differ between ICUs with high versus low numbers of protocols for lung protective ventilation in acute respiratory distress syndrome (47% vs 52%; p = 0.28) and for spontaneous breathing trials (55% vs 51%; p = 0.27).
CONCLUSIONS - Clinical protocols are highly prevalent in U.S. ICUs. The presence of a greater number of protocols was not associated with protocol compliance or patient mortality.
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Pharmacist leadership in ICU quality improvement: coordinating spontaneous awakening and breathing trials.
Stollings JL, Foss JJ, Ely EW, Ambrose AM, Rice TW, Girard TD, Wheeler AP
(2015) Ann Pharmacother 49: 883-91
MeSH Terms: Critical Care, Humans, Intensive Care Units, Leadership, Pharmacists, Pharmacy Service, Hospital, Prospective Studies, Quality Improvement, Respiration, Artificial, Ventilator Weaning
Show Abstract · Added September 23, 2015
BACKGROUND - Coordinating efforts across disciplines in the intensive care unit is a key component of quality improvement (QI) efforts. Spontaneous awakening trials (SATs) and spontaneous breathing trials (SBTs) are considered key components of guidelines, yet unfortunately are often not done or coordinated properly.
OBJECTIVE - To determine if a pharmacist-driven awakening and breathing coordination (ABC) QI program would improve compliance (ie, process measures) as compared with the previous protocol, which did not involve pharmacists.
METHODS - The QI program included pharmacist-led education, daily discussion on rounds, and weekly performance reports to staff. Using a pre-QI versus during-QI versus post-QI intervention design, we compared data from 500 control ventilator-days (pre-QI period) versus 580 prospective ventilator-days (during-QI period). We then evaluated the sustainability of the QI program in 216 ventilator-days in the post-QI period.
RESULTS - SAT safety screens were performed on only 20% pre-QI patient-days versus 97% of during-QI patient-days (P < 0.001) and 100% of post-QI patient-days (P = 0.25). The rates of passing the SAT safety screen in pre-QI and during-QI periods were 63% versus 78% (P = 0.03) and 81% in the post-QI period (P = 0.86). The rates of SATs among eligible patients on continuous infusions were only 53% in the pre-QI versus 85% in the during-QI (P = 0.0001) and 87% in the post-QI (P = 1) periods.
CONCLUSIONS - In this QI initiative, a pharmacist-driven, interdisciplinary ABC protocol significantly improved process measures compliance, comparing the pre-QI versus during-QI rates of screening, performing, and coordinating SAT and SBTs, and these results were sustained in the 8-month follow-up period post-QI program.
© The Author(s) 2015.
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10 MeSH Terms