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FGF9 and FGF20 maintain the stemness of nephron progenitors in mice and man.
Barak H, Huh SH, Chen S, Jeanpierre C, Martinovic J, Parisot M, Bole-Feysot C, Nitschké P, Salomon R, Antignac C, Ornitz DM, Kopan R
(2012) Dev Cell 22: 1191-207
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bone Morphogenetic Protein 7, Cell Differentiation, Congenital Abnormalities, Female, Fibroblast Growth Factor 9, Fibroblast Growth Factors, Humans, Kidney, Kidney Diseases, Male, Mesenchymal Stem Cells, Mice, Mutation, Nephrons, Organ Culture Techniques, Stem Cell Niche, Wnt Signaling Pathway
Show Abstract · Added June 27, 2012
The identity of niche signals necessary to maintain embryonic nephron progenitors is unclear. Here we provide evidence that Fgf20 and Fgf9, expressed in the niche, and Fgf9, secreted from the adjacent ureteric bud, are necessary and sufficient to maintain progenitor stemness. Reduction in the level of these redundant ligands in the mouse led to premature progenitor differentiation within the niche. Loss of FGF20 in humans, or of both ligands in mice, resulted in kidney agenesis. Sufficiency was shown in vitro where Fgf20 or Fgf9 (alone or together with Bmp7) maintained isolated metanephric mesenchyme or sorted nephron progenitors that remained competent to differentiate in response to Wnt signals after 5 or 2 days in culture, respectively. These findings identify a long-sought-after critical component of the nephron stem cell niche and hold promise for long-term culture and utilization of these progenitors in vitro.
Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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18 MeSH Terms
Genetic disease in the children of Danish survivors of childhood and adolescent cancer.
Winther JF, Olsen JH, Wu H, Shyr Y, Mulvihill JJ, Stovall M, Nielsen A, Schmiegelow M, Boice JD
(2012) J Clin Oncol 30: 27-33
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Antineoplastic Agents, Child, Chromosome Aberrations, Cohort Studies, Congenital Abnormalities, Denmark, Female, Genetic Diseases, Inborn, Germ-Line Mutation, Gonads, Humans, Infant Mortality, Infant, Newborn, Male, Neoplasms, Pregnancy, Pregnancy Outcome, Radiotherapy, Radiotherapy Dosage, Registries, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Stillbirth, Survivors
Show Abstract · Added March 10, 2014
PURPOSE - Preconception radiation and chemotherapy have the potential to produce germ cell mutations leading to genetic disease in the next generation. Dose-response relationships were evaluated between cancer treatments and untoward pregnancy outcomes.
PATIENTS AND METHODS - A case-cohort study was conducted involving 472 Danish survivors of childhood and adolescent cancer and their 1,037 pregnancies. Adverse outcomes included 159 congenital malformations, six chromosomal abnormalities, seven stillbirths, and nine neonatal deaths. Preconception radiation doses to the gonads, uterus, and pituitary gland and administered chemotherapy were quantified based on medical records and related to adverse outcomes using a generalized estimating equation model.
RESULTS - No statistically significant associations were found between genetic disease in children and parental treatment with alkylating drugs or preconception radiation doses to the testes in male and ovaries in female cancer survivors. Specifically, the risk of genetic disease was similar among the children of irradiated survivors when compared with nonirradiated survivors (relative risk [RR], 1.02; 95% CI, 0.59 to 1.44; P = .94). A statistically significant association between abdomino-pelvic irradiation and malformations, stillbirths, and neonatal deaths was not seen in the children of female survivors overall (P = .07) or in the children of mothers receiving high uterine doses (mean, 13.5 Gy; max, 100 Gy; RR, 2.3; 95% CI, 0.95 to 5.56).
CONCLUSION - Mutagenic chemotherapy and radiotherapy doses to the gonads were not associated with genetic defects in children of cancer survivors. However, larger studies need to be conducted to further explore potential associations between high-dose pelvic irradiation and specific adverse pregnancy outcomes.
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25 MeSH Terms
A copy number variation morbidity map of developmental delay.
Cooper GM, Coe BP, Girirajan S, Rosenfeld JA, Vu TH, Baker C, Williams C, Stalker H, Hamid R, Hannig V, Abdel-Hamid H, Bader P, McCracken E, Niyazov D, Leppig K, Thiese H, Hummel M, Alexander N, Gorski J, Kussmann J, Shashi V, Johnson K, Rehder C, Ballif BC, Shaffer LG, Eichler EE
(2011) Nat Genet 43: 838-46
MeSH Terms: Adult, Child, Preschool, Chromosome Mapping, Congenital Abnormalities, Developmental Disabilities, Gene Dosage, Genetic Variation, Humans
Show Abstract · Added March 27, 2014
To understand the genetic heterogeneity underlying developmental delay, we compared copy number variants (CNVs) in 15,767 children with intellectual disability and various congenital defects (cases) to CNVs in 8,329 unaffected adult controls. We estimate that ∼14.2% of disease in these children is caused by CNVs >400 kb. We observed a greater enrichment of CNVs in individuals with craniofacial anomalies and cardiovascular defects compared to those with epilepsy or autism. We identified 59 pathogenic CNVs, including 14 new or previously weakly supported candidates, refined the critical interval for several genomic disorders, such as the 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome, and identified 940 candidate dosage-sensitive genes. We also developed methods to opportunistically discover small, disruptive CNVs within the large and growing diagnostic array datasets. This evolving CNV morbidity map, combined with exome and genome sequencing, will be critical for deciphering the genetic basis of developmental delay, intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorders.
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8 MeSH Terms
A new set of classifications for ductal plate malformations.
Huppert SS
(2011) Hepatology 53: 1795-7
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bile Ducts, Intrahepatic, Biomarkers, Congenital Abnormalities, Disease Models, Animal, Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 1-beta, Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4, Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 6, Humans, Liver Diseases, Membrane Proteins, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases, Receptor, Transforming Growth Factor-beta Type II, Receptors, Transforming Growth Factor beta, SOX9 Transcription Factor
Added July 16, 2011
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Congenital abnormalities: a legacy of cancer treatment?
Signorello LB, Friedman DL, Boice JD
(2011) J Natl Cancer Inst 103: 358-9
MeSH Terms: Adult, Congenital Abnormalities, DNA Damage, Denmark, Humans, Male, Medical Record Linkage, Neoplasms, Registries, Sweden
Added March 27, 2014
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10 MeSH Terms
Recurrent rearrangements of chromosome 1q21.1 and variable pediatric phenotypes.
Mefford HC, Sharp AJ, Baker C, Itsara A, Jiang Z, Buysse K, Huang S, Maloney VK, Crolla JA, Baralle D, Collins A, Mercer C, Norga K, de Ravel T, Devriendt K, Bongers EM, de Leeuw N, Reardon W, Gimelli S, Bena F, Hennekam RC, Male A, Gaunt L, Clayton-Smith J, Simonic I, Park SM, Mehta SG, Nik-Zainal S, Woods CG, Firth HV, Parkin G, Fichera M, Reitano S, Lo Giudice M, Li KE, Casuga I, Broomer A, Conrad B, Schwerzmann M, Räber L, Gallati S, Striano P, Coppola A, Tolmie JL, Tobias ES, Lilley C, Armengol L, Spysschaert Y, Verloo P, De Coene A, Goossens L, Mortier G, Speleman F, van Binsbergen E, Nelen MR, Hochstenbach R, Poot M, Gallagher L, Gill M, McClellan J, King MC, Regan R, Skinner C, Stevenson RE, Antonarakis SE, Chen C, Estivill X, Menten B, Gimelli G, Gribble S, Schwartz S, Sutcliffe JS, Walsh T, Knight SJ, Sebat J, Romano C, Schwartz CE, Veltman JA, de Vries BB, Vermeesch JR, Barber JC, Willatt L, Tassabehji M, Eichler EE
(2008) N Engl J Med 359: 1685-99
MeSH Terms: Autistic Disorder, Cataract, Child, Chromosome Aberrations, Chromosome Deletion, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 1, Congenital Abnormalities, Female, Gene Duplication, Gene Rearrangement, Genetic Variation, Heart Defects, Congenital, Humans, Intellectual Disability, Male, Microcephaly, Phenotype, Recombination, Genetic
Show Abstract · Added February 20, 2014
BACKGROUND - Duplications and deletions in the human genome can cause disease or predispose persons to disease. Advances in technologies to detect these changes allow for the routine identification of submicroscopic imbalances in large numbers of patients.
METHODS - We tested for the presence of microdeletions and microduplications at a specific region of chromosome 1q21.1 in two groups of patients with unexplained mental retardation, autism, or congenital anomalies and in unaffected persons.
RESULTS - We identified 25 persons with a recurrent 1.35-Mb deletion within 1q21.1 from screening 5218 patients. The microdeletions had arisen de novo in eight patients, were inherited from a mildly affected parent in three patients, were inherited from an apparently unaffected parent in six patients, and were of unknown inheritance in eight patients. The deletion was absent in a series of 4737 control persons (P=1.1x10(-7)). We found considerable variability in the level of phenotypic expression of the microdeletion; phenotypes included mild-to-moderate mental retardation, microcephaly, cardiac abnormalities, and cataracts. The reciprocal duplication was enriched in nine children with mental retardation or autism spectrum disorder and other variable features (P=0.02). We identified three deletions and three duplications of the 1q21.1 region in an independent sample of 788 patients with mental retardation and congenital anomalies.
CONCLUSIONS - We have identified recurrent molecular lesions that elude syndromic classification and whose disease manifestations must be considered in a broader context of development as opposed to being assigned to a specific disease. Clinical diagnosis in patients with these lesions may be most readily achieved on the basis of genotype rather than phenotype.
2008 Massachusetts Medical Society
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18 MeSH Terms
Maternal and perinatal characteristics in relation to neuroblastoma.
Chow EJ, Friedman DL, Mueller BA
(2007) Cancer 109: 983-92
MeSH Terms: Age of Onset, Brain Neoplasms, Case-Control Studies, Congenital Abnormalities, Diabetes, Gestational, Female, Heart Diseases, Humans, Infant, Newborn, Neuroblastoma, Pregnancy, Risk Factors
Show Abstract · Added March 27, 2014
BACKGROUND - Neuroblastoma is the most common malignancy among infants, but risk factors remain poorly understood. Because most patients present in the first few years of life, it has been hypothesized that prenatal and perinatal exposures may contribute to the pathogenesis of neuroblastoma.
METHODS - A population-based case-control study was conducted by using linked birth and cancer registry records from 1980 to 2004 in Washington State. Maternal and infant characteristics from birth and hospital discharge records for 240 cases of neuroblastoma and 2400 controls were compared.
RESULTS - Neuroblastoma was associated with the presence of major congenital abnormalities (odds ratio [OR], 6.86; [95% CI], 2.92-16.08), particularly with cardiac abnormalities (OR, 5.84; 95% CI, 1.93-17.66), even after excluding abnormalities near the primary tumor. A borderline association was observed with maternal gestational diabetes (OR, 1.84; 95% CI, 0.98-3.47). The magnitude of both associations was greater when the analysis was limited to children who were diagnosed at age <1 year.
CONCLUSIONS - The findings from this population-based study supported prior case-control studies that identified an etiologic link between neuroblastoma and congenital abnormalities. However, to the authors' knowledge, the association between neuroblastoma and maternal diabetes has not been reported previously and requires further study.
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12 MeSH Terms
An E2F binding-deficient Rb1 protein partially rescues developmental defects associated with Rb1 nullizygosity.
Sun H, Chang Y, Schweers B, Dyer MA, Zhang X, Hayward SW, Goodrich DW
(2006) Mol Cell Biol 26: 1527-37
MeSH Terms: Alleles, Amino Acid Substitution, Animals, Base Sequence, Cell Cycle, Congenital Abnormalities, DNA, E2F Transcription Factors, Female, Fetal Development, Homozygote, Male, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Mice, Mutant Strains, Mutagenesis, Site-Directed, Pregnancy, Recombinant Proteins, Retina, Retinoblastoma Protein
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Rb1 is essential for normal embryonic development, as null mice die in midgestation with widespread unscheduled cell proliferation. Rb1 protein (pRb) mediates cell cycle control by binding E2F transcription factors and repressing expression from E2F-dependent promoters. An increasing amount of evidence suggests that pRb loss also compromises cellular differentiation. Since differentiation is often dependent on cell cycle exit, it is currently unclear whether the effects of pRb on differentiation are an indirect consequence of pRb/E2F-mediated cell cycle control or whether they reflect direct cell-type-specific pRb functions. We have mutated Rb1 in the mouse to express a protein (R654W) specifically deficient in binding E2F1, E2F2, and E2F3. R654W mutant embryos exhibit cell cycle defects the same as those of Rb1 null embryos, reinforcing the importance of the interactions of pRb with E2F1, E2F2, and E2F3 for cell cycle control. However, R654W embryos survive at least 2 days longer than Rb1 null embryos, and increased life span is associated with improved erythrocyte and fetal liver macrophage differentiation. In contrast, R654W pRb does not rescue differentiation defects associated with pRb-deficient retinae. These data indicate that Rb1 makes important cell-type-specific contributions to cellular differentiation that are genetically separable from its general ability to stably bind E2F1, E2F2, and E2F3 and regulate the cell cycle.
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20 MeSH Terms
Embryogenesis of the congenital anomalies of the kidney and the urinary tract.
Kuwayama F, Miyazaki Y, Ichikawa I
(2002) Nephrol Dial Transplant 17 Suppl 9: 45-7
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bone Morphogenetic Protein 4, Bone Morphogenetic Proteins, Congenital Abnormalities, Embryo, Mammalian, Embryonic and Fetal Development, Humans, Kidney, Mice, Receptor, Angiotensin, Type 2, Receptors, Angiotensin, Urinary Tract
Show Abstract · Added January 25, 2012
Ectopia of the initial ureter is the first ontogenic mis-step that leads to many congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT). The ectopia results in hypoplastic kidney, ectopia of the ureteral orifice, urinary outflow obstruction and/or reflux. Recent studies on several mutant mouse models verified that ectopic ureteral budding indeed occurs prior to the formation of CAKUT. Often, the genes involved in navigating the site of ureteral budding also regulate later ontogenic processes of the kidney and other urinary tract systems. These additional functions of the genes underlie the wide spectrum of CAKUT, as the genes are expressed at multiple sites at multiple ontogenic stages, and regulate the morphogenesis of the many portions of the excretory system through their distinctive cellular functions.
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12 MeSH Terms
Targeted deletion of the MLC1f/3f downstream enhancer results in precocious MLC expression and mesoderm ablation.
Jiang P, Song J, Gu G, Slonimsky E, Li E, Rosenthal N
(2002) Dev Biol 243: 281-93
MeSH Terms: Animals, Blastocyst, Chimera, Congenital Abnormalities, Embryonic and Fetal Development, Enhancer Elements, Genetic, Fetal Proteins, Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental, Gene Targeting, Genes, Lethal, Gestational Age, Heterozygote, In Situ Hybridization, Mesoderm, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Myosin Light Chains, Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction, Sequence Deletion, Stem Cells
Show Abstract · Added June 9, 2010
The expression of skeletal muscle contractile proteins is tightly regulated during embryonic development. In the mouse, the myosin light chain (MLC) 1f/3f gene locus is not activated until E9.5, exclusively in skeletal muscle precursor cells. A potent enhancer downstream of the MLC1f/3f locus confers correct temporal and spatial activation of linked reporter gene in transgenic mouse embryos. To examine roles of the MLC downstream enhancer (MLCE) in its native context of the MLC1f/3f gene locus, we eliminated a 1.5-kb DNA segment containing the enhancer from the mouse genome by targeted deletion, leaving no exogenous sequences at the deletion site. Mouse embryos homozygous for the MLCE deletion were smaller and developmentally delayed, formed no mesoderm by E7.5, and were resorbed almost completely at E8.5. In situ hybridization and RT-PCR analyses of affected mutant embryos at E7.5 revealed ectopic MLC transcripts, whose products would be predicted to interfere with a variety of nonmuscle cell functions determining differentiation of mesoderm. These results suggest that the MLC downstream enhancer and its flanking sequences include negative regulatory elements which block precocious activation of MLC expression in mesodermal precursors during a critical window of development, as well as positive elements which subsequently permit tissue-restricted MLC transcription in differentiating skeletal muscles.
(C)2002 Elsevier Science (USA).
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20 MeSH Terms