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Convergence of spoken and written language processing in the superior temporal sulcus.
Wilson SM, Bautista A, McCarron A
(2018) Neuroimage 171: 62-74
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Brain Mapping, Comprehension, Female, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Reading, Speech Perception, Temporal Lobe, Writing, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Spoken and written language processing streams converge in the superior temporal sulcus (STS), but the functional and anatomical nature of this convergence is not clear. We used functional MRI to quantify neural responses to spoken and written language, along with unintelligible stimuli in each modality, and employed several strategies to segregate activations on the dorsal and ventral banks of the STS. We found that intelligible and unintelligible inputs in both modalities activated the dorsal bank of the STS. The posterior dorsal bank was able to discriminate between modalities based on distributed patterns of activity, pointing to a role in encoding of phonological and orthographic word forms. The anterior dorsal bank was agnostic to input modality, suggesting that this region represents abstract lexical nodes. In the ventral bank of the STS, responses to unintelligible inputs in both modalities were attenuated, while intelligible inputs continued to drive activation, indicative of higher level semantic and syntactic processing. Our results suggest that the processing of spoken and written language converges on the posterior dorsal bank of the STS, which is the first of a heterogeneous set of language regions within the STS, with distinct functions spanning a broad range of linguistic processes.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Word Processing in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders: Evidence From Event-Related Potentials.
Sandbank M, Yoder P, Key AP
(2017) J Speech Lang Hear Res 60: 3441-3455
MeSH Terms: Autism Spectrum Disorder, Child Language, Child, Preschool, Comprehension, Electroencephalography, Evoked Potentials, Female, Humans, Male, Recognition, Psychology, Speech Perception, Vocabulary
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2020
Purpose - This investigation was conducted to determine whether young children with autism spectrum disorders exhibited a canonical neural response to word stimuli and whether putative event-related potential (ERP) measures of word processing were correlated with a concurrent measure of receptive language. Additional exploratory analyses were used to examine whether the magnitude of the association between ERP measures of word processing and receptive language varied as a function of the number of word stimuli the participants reportedly understood.
Method - Auditory ERPs were recorded in response to spoken words and nonwords presented with equal probability in 34 children aged 2-5 years with a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder who were in the early stages of language acquisition. Average amplitudes and amplitude differences between word and nonword stimuli within 200-500 ms were examined at left temporal (T3) and parietal (P3) electrode clusters. Receptive vocabulary size and the number of experimental stimuli understood were concurrently measured using the MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventories.
Results - Across the entire participant group, word-nonword amplitude differences were diminished. The average word-nonword amplitude difference at T3 was related to receptive vocabulary only if 5 or more word stimuli were understood.
Conclusions - If ERPs are to ever have clinical utility, their construct validity must be established by investigations that confirm their associations with predictably related constructs. These results contribute to accruing evidence, suggesting that a valid measure of auditory word processing can be derived from the left temporal response to words and nonwords. In addition, this measure can be useful even for participants who do not reportedly understand all of the words presented as experimental stimuli, though it will be important for researchers to track familiarity with word stimuli in future investigations.
Supplemental Material - https://doi.org/10.23641/asha.5614840.
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Cognitive functioning over 2 years after intracerebral hemorrhage in school-aged children.
Murphy LK, Compas BE, Gindville MC, Reeslund KL, Jordan LC
(2017) Dev Med Child Neurol 59: 1146-1151
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Cerebral Hemorrhage, Child, Cognition Disorders, Comprehension, Female, Humans, Intelligence, Intelligence Tests, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Memory, Short-Term, Neurologic Examination, Neuropsychological Tests, Outcome Assessment, Health Care
Show Abstract · Added March 24, 2020
AIM - Previous research investigating outcomes after pediatric intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) has generally been limited to global and sensorimotor outcomes. This study examined cognitive outcomes after spontaneous ICH in school-aged children with serial assessments over 2 years after stroke.
METHOD - Seven children (age range 6-16y, median 13; six males, one female; 57% white, 43% black) presenting with spontaneous ICH (six arteriovenous malformations) were assessed at 3 months, 12 months, and 24 months after stroke. The Pediatric Stroke Outcome Measure (PSOM) quantified neurological outcome and Wechsler Intelligence Scales measured cognitive outcomes: verbal comprehension, perceptual reasoning, working memory, and processing speed.
RESULTS - PSOM scales showed improved neurological function over the first 12 months, with mild to no sensorimotor deficits and moderate overall deficits at 1- and 2-year follow-ups (median 2-year sensorimotor PSOM=0.5, total PSOM=1.5). Changes in cognitive function indicated a different trajectory; verbal comprehension and perceptual reasoning improved over 24 months; low performance was sustained in processing speed and working memory. Age-normed centile scores decreased between 1- and 2-year follow-ups for working memory, suggesting emerging deficits compared with peers.
INTERPRETATION - Early and serial cognitive testing in children with ICH is needed to assess cognitive functioning and support children in school as they age and cognitive deficits become more apparent and important for function.
WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS - In children with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), motor function improved between 3 months and 24 months. Improvements in cognitive function were variable between 3 months and 24 months. Working memory centiles declined, suggesting emerging deficits compared with peers. Processing speed improved but remained significantly below the 50th centile. Cognitive impact of ICH may increase with age in children.
© 2017 Mac Keith Press.
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Variable disruption of a syntactic processing network in primary progressive aphasia.
Wilson SM, DeMarco AT, Henry ML, Gesierich B, Babiak M, Miller BL, Gorno-Tempini ML
(2016) Brain 139: 2994-3006
MeSH Terms: Aged, Aphasia, Primary Progressive, Brain, Case-Control Studies, Comprehension, Female, Humans, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Mental Status Schedule, Middle Aged, Oxygen, Recognition, Psychology, Semantics, Verbal Behavior
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Syntactic processing deficits are highly variable in individuals with primary progressive aphasia. Damage to left inferior frontal cortex has been associated with syntactic deficits in primary progressive aphasia in a number of structural and functional neuroimaging studies. However, a contrasting picture of a broader syntactic network has emerged from neuropsychological studies in other aphasic cohorts, and functional imaging studies in healthy controls. To reconcile these findings, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the functional neuroanatomy of syntactic comprehension in 51 individuals with primary progressive aphasia, composed of all clinical variants and a range of degrees of syntactic processing impairment. We used trial-by-trial reaction time as a proxy for syntactic processing load, to determine which regions were modulated by syntactic processing in each patient, and how the set of regions recruited was related to whether syntactic processing was ultimately successful or unsuccessful. Relationships between functional abnormalities and patterns of cortical atrophy were also investigated. We found that the individual degree of syntactic comprehension impairment was predicted by left frontal atrophy, but also by functional disruption of a broader syntactic processing network, comprising left posterior frontal cortex, left posterior temporal cortex, and the left intraparietal sulcus and adjacent regions. These regions were modulated by syntactic processing in healthy controls and in patients with primary progressive aphasia with relatively spared syntax, but they were modulated to a lesser extent or not at all in primary progressive aphasia patients whose syntax was relatively impaired. Our findings suggest that syntactic comprehension deficits in primary progressive aphasia reflect not only structural and functional changes in left frontal cortex, but also disruption of a wider syntactic processing network.
© The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.
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16 MeSH Terms
Anomalous gray matter patterns in specific reading comprehension deficit are independent of dyslexia.
Bailey S, Hoeft F, Aboud K, Cutting L
(2016) Ann Dyslexia 66: 256-274
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Brain Mapping, Child, Comprehension, Dyslexia, Female, Gray Matter, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Predictive Value of Tests, Reading, Semantics
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2017
Specific reading comprehension deficit (SRCD) affects up to 10 % of all children. SRCD is distinct from dyslexia (DYS) in that individuals with SRCD show poor comprehension despite adequate decoding skills. Despite its prevalence and considerable behavioral research, there is not yet a unified cognitive profile of SRCD. While its neuroanatomical basis is unknown, SRCD could be anomalous in regions subserving their commonly reported cognitive weaknesses in semantic processing or executive function. Here we investigated, for the first time, patterns of gray matter volume difference in SRCD as compared to DYS and typical developing (TD) adolescent readers (N = 41). A linear support vector machine algorithm was applied to whole brain gray matter volumes generated through voxel-based morphometry. As expected, DYS differed significantly from TD in a pattern that included features from left fusiform and supramarginal gyri (DYS vs. TD: 80.0 %, p < 0.01). SRCD was well differentiated not only from TD (92.5 %, p < 0.001) but also from DYS (88.0 %, p < 0.001). Of particular interest were findings of reduced gray matter volume in right frontal areas that were also supported by univariate analysis. These areas are thought to subserve executive processes relevant for reading, such as monitoring and manipulating mental representations. Thus, preliminary analyses suggest that SRCD readers possess a distinct neural profile compared to both TD and DYS readers and that these differences might be linked to domain-general abilities. This work provides a foundation for further investigation into variants of reading disability beyond DYS.
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13 MeSH Terms
Treating Speech Comprehensibility in Students With Down Syndrome.
Yoder PJ, Camarata S, Woynaroski T
(2016) J Speech Lang Hear Res 59: 446-59
MeSH Terms: Child, Child, Preschool, Comprehension, Down Syndrome, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Imitative Behavior, Language Tests, Models, Statistical, Schools, Speech Intelligibility, Speech Therapy, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added March 18, 2020
PURPOSE - This study examined whether a particular type of therapy (Broad Target Speech Recasts, BTSR) was superior to a contrast treatment in facilitating speech comprehensibility in conversations of students with Down syndrome who began treatment with initially high verbal imitation.
METHOD - We randomly assigned 51 5- to 12-year-old students to either BTSR or a contrast treatment. Therapy occurred in hour-long 1-to-1 sessions in students' schools twice per week for 6 months.
RESULTS - For students who entered treatment just above the sample average in verbal-imitation skill, BTSR was superior to the contrast treatment in facilitating the growth of speech comprehensibility in conversational samples. The number of speech recasts mediated or explained the BTSR treatment effect on speech comprehensibility.
CONCLUSION - Speech comprehensibility is malleable in school-age students with Down syndrome. BTSR facilitates comprehensibility in students with just above the sample average level of verbal imitation prior to treatment. Speech recasts in BTSR are largely responsible for this effect.
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Measuring Speech Comprehensibility in Students with Down Syndrome.
Yoder PJ, Woynaroski T, Camarata S
(2016) J Speech Lang Hear Res 59: 460-7
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Child, Comprehension, Down Syndrome, Humans, Observer Variation, Regression Analysis, Speech Disorders, Speech Intelligibility, Speech Production Measurement, Students, Video Recording
Show Abstract · Added March 18, 2020
PURPOSE - There is an ongoing need to develop assessments of spontaneous speech that focus on whether the child's utterances are comprehensible to listeners. This study sought to identify the attributes of a stable ratings-based measure of speech comprehensibility, which enabled examining the criterion-related validity of an orthography-based measure of the comprehensibility of conversational speech in students with Down syndrome.
METHOD - Participants were 10 elementary school students with Down syndrome and 4 unfamiliar adult raters. Averaged across-observer Likert ratings of speech comprehensibility were called a ratings-based measure of speech comprehensibility. The proportion of utterance attempts fully glossed constituted an orthography-based measure of speech comprehensibility.
RESULTS - Averaging across 4 raters on four 5-min segments produced a reliable (G = .83) ratings-based measure of speech comprehensibility. The ratings-based measure was strongly (r > .80) correlated with the orthography-based measure for both the same and different conversational samples.
CONCLUSION - Reliable and valid measures of speech comprehensibility are achievable with the resources available to many researchers and some clinicians.
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Comprehending text versus reading words in young readers with varying reading ability: distinct patterns of functional connectivity from common processing hubs.
Aboud KS, Bailey SK, Petrill SA, Cutting LE
(2016) Dev Sci 19: 632-56
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Child, Comprehension, Functional Laterality, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Memory, Short-Term, Nerve Net, Reading, Semantics
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2017
Skilled reading depends on recognizing words efficiently in isolation (word-level processing; WL) and extracting meaning from text (discourse-level processing; DL); deficiencies in either result in poor reading. FMRI has revealed consistent overlapping networks in word and passage reading, as well as unique regions for DL processing; however, less is known about how WL and DL processes interact. Here we examined functional connectivity from seed regions derived from where BOLD signal overlapped during word and passage reading in 38 adolescents ranging in reading ability, hypothesizing that even though certain regions support word- and higher-level language, connectivity patterns from overlapping regions would be task modulated. Results indeed revealed that the left-lateralized semantic and working memory (WM) seed regions showed task-dependent functional connectivity patterns: during DL processes, semantic and WM nodes all correlated with the left angular gyrus, a region implicated in semantic memory/coherence building. In contrast, during WL, these nodes coordinated with a traditional WL area (left occipitotemporal region). In addition, these WL and DL findings were modulated by decoding and comprehension abilities, respectively, with poorer abilities correlating with decreased connectivity. Findings indicate that key regions may uniquely contribute to multiple levels of reading; we speculate that these connectivity patterns may be especially salient for reading outcomes and intervention response.
© 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
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10 MeSH Terms
Evaluating the Merits of CKD Patient Educational Materials: Readability Is Necessary But Not Sufficient.
Tuot DS, Cavanaugh KL
(2015) Am J Kidney Dis 65: 814-6
MeSH Terms: Comprehension, Humans, Internet, Patient Education as Topic, Reading, Renal Insufficiency, Chronic, Teaching Materials
Added August 4, 2015
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7 MeSH Terms
Testing sensory and multisensory function in children with autism spectrum disorder.
Baum SH, Stevenson RA, Wallace MT
(2015) J Vis Exp : e52677
MeSH Terms: Acoustic Stimulation, Adolescent, Auditory Perception, Autism Spectrum Disorder, Behavior Rating Scale, Child, Cognition, Comprehension, Humans, Photic Stimulation, Visual Perception
Show Abstract · Added February 15, 2016
In addition to impairments in social communication and the presence of restricted interests and repetitive behaviors, deficits in sensory processing are now recognized as a core symptom in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Our ability to perceive and interact with the external world is rooted in sensory processing. For example, listening to a conversation entails processing the auditory cues coming from the speaker (speech content, prosody, syntax) as well as the associated visual information (facial expressions, gestures). Collectively, the "integration" of these multisensory (i.e., combined audiovisual) pieces of information results in better comprehension. Such multisensory integration has been shown to be strongly dependent upon the temporal relationship of the paired stimuli. Thus, stimuli that occur in close temporal proximity are highly likely to result in behavioral and perceptual benefits--gains believed to be reflective of the perceptual system's judgment of the likelihood that these two stimuli came from the same source. Changes in this temporal integration are expected to strongly alter perceptual processes, and are likely to diminish the ability to accurately perceive and interact with our world. Here, a battery of tasks designed to characterize various aspects of sensory and multisensory temporal processing in children with ASD is described. In addition to its utility in autism, this battery has great potential for characterizing changes in sensory function in other clinical populations, as well as being used to examine changes in these processes across the lifespan.
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11 MeSH Terms