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In-Hospital Deaths Among Adults With Community-Acquired Pneumonia.
Waterer GW, Self WH, Courtney DM, Grijalva CG, Balk RA, Girard TD, Fakhran SS, Trabue C, McNabb P, Anderson EJ, Williams DJ, Bramley AM, Jain S, Edwards KM, Wunderink RG
(2018) Chest 154: 628-635
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Cause of Death, Community-Acquired Infections, Female, Hospital Mortality, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Pneumonia, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors, United States
Show Abstract · Added July 27, 2018
BACKGROUND - Adults hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) are at high risk for short-term mortality. However, it is unclear whether improvements in in-hospital pneumonia care could substantially lower this risk. We extensively reviewed all in-hospital deaths in a large prospective CAP study to assess the cause of each death and assess the extent of potentially preventable mortality.
METHODS - We enrolled adults hospitalized with CAP at five tertiary-care hospitals in the United States. Five physician investigators reviewed the medical record and study database for each patient who died to identify the cause of death, the contribution of CAP to death, and any preventable factors potentially contributing to death.
RESULTS - Among 2,320 enrolled patients, 52 (2.2%) died during initial hospitalization. Among these 52 patients, 33 (63.4%) were ≥ 65 years old, and 32 (61.5%) had ≥ two chronic comorbidities. CAP was judged to be the direct cause of death in 27 patients (51.9%). Ten patients (19.2%) had do-not-resuscitate orders prior to admission. Four patients were identified in whom a lapse in quality of care potentially contributed to death; preexisting end-of-life limitations were present in two of these patients. Two patients seeking full medical care experienced a lapse in in-hospital quality of pneumonia care that potentially contributed to death.
CONCLUSIONS - In this study of adults with CAP at tertiary-care hospitals with a low mortality rate, most in-hospital deaths did not appear to be preventable with improvements in in-hospital pneumonia care. Preexisting end-of-life limitations in care, advanced age, and high comorbidity burden were common among those who died.
Copyright © 2018 American College of Chest Physicians. All rights reserved.
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14 MeSH Terms
Response.
Self WH, Upchurch CP, Wunderink RG, Waterer GW, Grijalva CG, Edwards KM
(2018) Chest 153: 763-764
MeSH Terms: Community-Acquired Infections, Humans, Pneumonia, Radiography, Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Added July 27, 2018
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5 MeSH Terms
Long-Term Cognitive Impairment after Hospitalization for Community-Acquired Pneumonia: a Prospective Cohort Study.
Girard TD, Self WH, Edwards KM, Grijalva CG, Zhu Y, Williams DJ, Jain S, Jackson JC
(2018) J Gen Intern Med 33: 929-935
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Cognitive Dysfunction, Cohort Studies, Community-Acquired Infections, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Hospitalization, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Pneumonia, Prospective Studies, Surveys and Questionnaires, Time Factors, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added July 27, 2018
BACKGROUND - Recent studies suggest older patients hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia are at risk for new-onset cognitive impairment. The characteristics of long-term cognitive impairment after pneumonia, however, have not been elucidated.
OBJECTIVE - To characterize long-term cognitive impairment among adults of all ages hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia.
DESIGN - Prospective cohort study.
PARTICIPANTS - Adults without severe preexisting cognitive impairment who were hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia.
MAIN MEASURES - At enrollment, we estimated baseline cognitive function with the Short Informant Questionnaire on Cognitive Decline in the Elderly (IQCODE). At 2- and 12-month follow-up, we assessed cognition using the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS) and tests of executive function, diagnosing cognitive impairment when results were ≥ 1.5 standard deviations below published age-adjusted means for the general population. We also identified subtypes of mild cognitive impairment using standard definitions.
KEY RESULTS - We assessed 58 (73%) of 80 patients who survived to 2-month follow-up and 57 (77%) of 74 who survived to 12-month follow-up. The median [range] age of survivors tested was 57 [19-97] years. Only 8 (12%) had evidence of mild cognitive impairment at baseline according to the Short IQCODE, but 21 (38%) at 2 months and 17 (30%) at 12 months had mild cognitive impairment per the RBANS. Moderate-to-severe cognitive impairment was common among adults ≥ 65 years [4/13 (31%) and 5/13 (38%) at 2 and 12 months, respectively] but also affected many of those < 65 years [10/43 (23%) and 8/43 (19%) at 2 and 12 months, respectively]. Deficits were most often noted in visuospatial function, attention, and memory.
CONCLUSIONS - A year after hospitalization for community-acquired pneumonia, moderate-to-severe impairment in multiple cognitive domains affected one-third of patients ≥ 65 years old and 20% of younger patients, and another third of survivors had mild cognitive impairment.
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17 MeSH Terms
Procalcitonin as a Marker of Etiology in Adults Hospitalized With Community-Acquired Pneumonia.
Self WH, Wunderink RG, Jain S, Edwards KM, Grijalva CG, Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community (EPIC) Study Investigators
(2018) Clin Infect Dis 66: 1640-1641
MeSH Terms: Adult, Community-Acquired Infections, Humans, Pneumonia, Procalcitonin
Added July 27, 2018
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5 MeSH Terms
Pneumococcal Community-Acquired Pneumonia Detected by Serotype-Specific Urinary Antigen Detection Assays.
Wunderink RG, Self WH, Anderson EJ, Balk R, Fakhran S, Courtney DM, Qi C, Williams DJ, Zhu Y, Whitney CG, Moore MR, Bramley A, Jain S, Edwards KM, Grijalva CG
(2018) Clin Infect Dis 66: 1504-1510
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Antigens, Bacterial, Community-Acquired Infections, Diagnostic Tests, Routine, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Pneumococcal Infections, Pneumonia, Bacterial, Serogroup, Urinalysis
Show Abstract · Added July 27, 2018
Background - Streptococcus pneumoniae is considered the leading bacterial cause of pneumonia in adults. Yet, it was not commonly detected by traditional culture-based and conventional urinary testing in a recent multicenter etiology study of adults hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). We used novel serotype-specific urinary antigen detection (SSUAD) assays to determine whether pneumococcal cases were missed by traditional testing.
Methods - We studied adult patients hospitalized with CAP at 5 hospitals in Chicago and Nashville (2010-2012) and enrolled in the Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community (EPIC) study. Traditional diagnostic testing included blood and sputum cultures and conventional urine antigen detection (ie, BinaxNOW). We applied SSUAD assays that target serotypes included in the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) to stored residual urine specimens.
Results - Among 1736 patients with SSUAD and ≥1 traditional pneumococcal test performed, we identified 169 (9.7%) cases of pneumococcal CAP. Traditional tests identified 93 (5.4%) and SSUAD identified 76 (4.4%) additional cases. Among 14 PCV13-serotype cases identified by culture, SSUAD correctly identified the same serotype in all of them. Cases identified by SSUAD vs traditional tests were similar in most demographic and clinical characteristics, although disease severity and procalcitonin concentration were highest among those with positive blood cultures. The proportion of pneumonia cases caused by serotypes exclusively covered by PCV13 was not significantly different between the first and second July-June study periods (6.4% vs 4.0%).
Conclusions - Although restricted to the detection of only 13 serotypes, SSUAD testing substantially increased the detection of pneumococcal pneumonia among adults hospitalized with CAP.
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13 MeSH Terms
Etiology and Impact of Coinfections in Children Hospitalized With Community-Acquired Pneumonia.
Nolan VG, Arnold SR, Bramley AM, Ampofo K, Williams DJ, Grijalva CG, Self WH, Anderson EJ, Wunderink RG, Edwards KM, Pavia AT, Jain S, McCullers JA
(2018) J Infect Dis 218: 179-188
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Bacteria, Child, Child, Preschool, Cohort Studies, Coinfection, Community-Acquired Infections, Female, Hospitalization, Humans, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Male, Pneumonia, Treatment Outcome, Viruses
Show Abstract · Added July 27, 2018
Background - Recognition that coinfections are common in children with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is increasing, but gaps remain in our understanding of their frequency and importance.
Methods - We analyzed data from 2219 children hospitalized with CAP and compared demographic and clinical characteristics and outcomes between groups with viruses alone, bacteria alone, or coinfections. We also assessed the frequency of selected pairings of codetected pathogens and their clinical characteristics.
Results - A total of 576 children (26%) had a coinfection. Children with only virus detected were younger, more likely to be black, and more likely to have comorbidities such as asthma, compared with children infected with typical bacteria alone. Children with virus-bacterium coinfections had a higher frequency of leukocytosis, consolidation on chest radiography, parapneumonic effusions, intensive care unit admission, and need for mechanical ventilation and an increased length of stay, compared with children infected with viruses alone. Virus-virus coinfections were generally comparable to single-virus infections, with the exception of the need for oxygen supplementation, which was higher during the first 24 hours of hospitalization in some virus-virus pairings.
Conclusions - Coinfections occurred in 26% of children hospitalized for CAP. Children with typical bacterial infections, alone or complicated by a viral infection, have worse outcomes than children infected with a virus alone.
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16 MeSH Terms
Effectiveness of β-Lactam Monotherapy vs Macrolide Combination Therapy for Children Hospitalized With Pneumonia.
Williams DJ, Edwards KM, Self WH, Zhu Y, Arnold SR, McCullers JA, Ampofo K, Pavia AT, Anderson EJ, Hicks LA, Bramley AM, Jain S, Grijalva CG
(2017) JAMA Pediatr 171: 1184-1191
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Anti-Bacterial Agents, Child, Child, Preschool, Community-Acquired Infections, Drug Therapy, Combination, Hospitalization, Humans, Infant, Intensive Care Units, Pediatric, Length of Stay, Macrolides, Patient Readmission, Pneumonia, Bacterial, Propensity Score, Radiography, Treatment Outcome, beta-Lactams
Show Abstract · Added July 27, 2018
Importance - β-Lactam monotherapy and β-lactam plus macrolide combination therapy are both common empirical treatment strategies for children hospitalized with pneumonia, but few studies have evaluated the effectiveness of these 2 treatment approaches.
Objective - To compare the effectiveness of β-lactam monotherapy vs β-lactam plus macrolide combination therapy among a cohort of children hospitalized with pneumonia.
Design, Setting, and Participants - We analyzed data from the Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community Study, a multicenter, prospective, population-based study of community-acquired pneumonia hospitalizations conducted from January 1, 2010, to June 30, 2012, in 3 children's hospitals in Nashville, Tennessee; Memphis, Tennessee; and Salt Lake City, Utah. The study included all children (up to 18 years of age) who were hospitalized with radiographically confirmed pneumonia and who received β-lactam monotherapy or β-lactam plus macrolide combination therapy. Data analysis was completed in April 2017.
Main Outcomes and Measures - We defined the referent as β-lactam monotherapy, including exclusive use of an oral or parenteral second- or third-generation cephalosporin, penicillin, ampicillin, ampicillin-sulbactam, amoxicillin, or amoxicillin-clavulanate. Use of a β-lactam plus an oral or parenteral macrolide (azithromycin or clarithromycin) served as the comparison group. We modeled the association between these groups and patients' length of stay using multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression. Covariates included demographic, clinical, and radiographic variables. We further evaluated length of stay in a cohort matched by propensity to receive combination therapy. Logistic regression was used to evaluate secondary outcomes in the unmatched cohort, including intensive care admission, rehospitalizations, and self-reported recovery at follow-up.
Results - Our study included 1418 children (693 girls and 725 boys) with a median age of 27 months (interquartile range, 12-69 months). This cohort was 60.1% of the 2358 children enrolled in the Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community Study with radiographically confirmed pneumonia in the study period; 1019 (71.9%) received β-lactam monotherapy and 399 (28.1%) received β-lactam plus macrolide combination therapy. In the unmatched cohort, there was no statistically significant difference in length of hospital stay between children receiving β-lactam monotherapy and combination therapy (median, 55 vs 59 hours; adjusted hazard ratio, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.74-1.01). The propensity-matched cohort (n = 560, 39.5%) showed similar results. There were also no significant differences between treatment groups for the secondary outcomes.
Conclusions and Relevance - Empirical macrolide combination therapy conferred no benefit over β-lactam monotherapy for children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia. The results of this study elicit questions about the routine empirical use of macrolide combination therapy in this population.
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Rhinovirus Viremia in Patients Hospitalized With Community-Acquired Pneumonia.
Lu X, Schneider E, Jain S, Bramley AM, Hymas W, Stockmann C, Ampofo K, Arnold SR, Williams DJ, Self WH, Patel A, Chappell JD, Grijalva CG, Anderson EJ, Wunderink RG, McCullers JA, Edwards KM, Pavia AT, Erdman DD
(2017) J Infect Dis 216: 1104-1111
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Child, Child, Preschool, Community-Acquired Infections, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Pneumonia, Viral, Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction, Rhinovirus, Viremia
Show Abstract · Added July 27, 2018
Background - Rhinoviruses (RVs) are ubiquitous respiratory pathogens that often cause mild or subclinical infections. Molecular detection of RVs from the upper respiratory tract can be prolonged, complicating etiologic association in persons with severe lower respiratory tract infections. Little is known about RV viremia and its value as a diagnostic indicator in persons hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP).
Methods - Sera from RV-positive children and adults hospitalized with CAP were tested for RV by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Rhinovirus species and type were determined by partial genome sequencing.
Results - Overall, 57 of 570 (10%) RV-positive patients were viremic, and all were children aged <10 years (n = 57/375; 15.2%). Although RV-A was the most common RV species detected from respiratory specimens (48.8%), almost all viremias were RV-C (98.2%). Viremic patients had fewer codetected pathogens and were more likely to have chest retractions, wheezing, and a history of underlying asthma/reactive airway disease than patients without viremia.
Conclusions - More than 1 out of 7 RV-infected children aged <10 years hospitalized with CAP were viremic. In contrast with other RV species, RV-C infections were highly associated with viremia and were usually the only respiratory pathogen identified, suggesting that RV-C viremia may be an important diagnostic indicator in pediatric pneumonia.
Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.
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Utility of Blood Culture Among Children Hospitalized With Community-Acquired Pneumonia.
Neuman MI, Hall M, Lipsett SC, Hersh AL, Williams DJ, Gerber JS, Brogan TV, Blaschke AJ, Grijalva CG, Parikh K, Ambroggio L, Shah SS, Pediatric Research in Inpatient Settings Network
(2017) Pediatrics 140:
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Anti-Bacterial Agents, Bacteremia, Bacteria, Blood Culture, Child, Child, Preschool, Community-Acquired Infections, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Hospitalization, Humans, Infant, Male, Microbial Sensitivity Tests, Penicillins, Pneumonia, Bacterial, Retrospective Studies
Show Abstract · Added July 27, 2018
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES - National guidelines recommend blood cultures for children hospitalized with presumed bacterial community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) that is moderate or severe. We sought to determine the prevalence of bacteremia and characterize the microbiology and penicillin-susceptibility patterns of positive blood culture results among children hospitalized with CAP.
METHODS - We conducted a cross-sectional study of children hospitalized with CAP in 6 children's hospitals from 2007 to 2011. We included children 3 months to 18 years of age with discharge diagnosis codes for CAP using a previously validated algorithm. We excluded children with complex chronic conditions. We reviewed microbiologic data and classified positive blood culture detections as pathogens or contaminants. Antibiotic-susceptibility patterns were assessed for all pathogens.
RESULTS - A total of 7509 children hospitalized with CAP were included over the 5-year study period. Overall, 34% of the children hospitalized with CAP had a blood culture performed; 65 (2.5% of patients with blood cultures; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.0%-3.2%) grew a pathogen. accounted for 78% of all detected pathogens. Among detected pathogens, 50 (82%) were susceptible to penicillin. Eleven children demonstrated growth of an organism nonsusceptible to penicillin, representing 0.43% (95% CI: 0.23%-0.77%) of children with blood cultures obtained and 0.15% (95% CI: 0.08%-0.26%) of all children hospitalized with CAP.
CONCLUSIONS - Among children without comorbidities hospitalized with CAP in a non-ICU setting, the rate of bacteremia was low, and isolated pathogens were usually susceptible to penicillin. Blood cultures may not be needed for most children hospitalized with CAP.
Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.
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Community-Acquired Pneumonia Visualized on CT Scans but Not Chest Radiographs: Pathogens, Severity, and Clinical Outcomes.
Upchurch CP, Grijalva CG, Wunderink RG, Williams DJ, Waterer GW, Anderson EJ, Zhu Y, Hart EM, Carroll F, Bramley AM, Jain S, Edwards KM, Self WH
(2018) Chest 153: 601-610
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Anti-Infective Agents, Community-Acquired Infections, Female, Hospital Mortality, Humans, Length of Stay, Male, Middle Aged, Pneumonia, Prospective Studies, Radiography, Thoracic, Respiration, Artificial, Severity of Illness Index, Tomography, X-Ray Computed, United States
Show Abstract · Added July 27, 2018
BACKGROUND - The clinical significance of pneumonia visualized on CT scan in the setting of a normal chest radiograph is uncertain.
METHODS - In a multicenter prospective surveillance study of adults hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), we compared the presenting clinical features, pathogens present, and outcomes of patients with pneumonia visualized on a CT scan but not on a concurrent chest radiograph (CT-only pneumonia) and those with pneumonia visualized on a chest radiograph. All patients underwent chest radiography; the decision to obtain CT imaging was determined by the treating clinicians. Chest radiographs and CT images were interpreted by study-dedicated thoracic radiologists blinded to the clinical data.
RESULTS - The study population included 2,251 adults with CAP; 2,185 patients (97%) had pneumonia visualized on chest radiography, whereas 66 patients (3%) had pneumonia visualized on CT scan but not on concurrent chest radiography. Overall, these patients with CT-only pneumonia had a clinical profile similar to those with pneumonia visualized on chest radiography, including comorbidities, vital signs, hospital length of stay, prevalence of viral (30% vs 26%) and bacterial (12% vs 14%) pathogens, ICU admission (23% vs 21%), use of mechanical ventilation (6% vs 5%), septic shock (5% vs 4%), and inhospital mortality (0 vs 2%).
CONCLUSIONS - Adults hospitalized with CAP who had radiological evidence of pneumonia on CT scan but not on concurrent chest radiograph had pathogens, disease severity, and outcomes similar to patients who had signs of pneumonia on chest radiography. These findings support using the same management principles for patients with CT-only pneumonia and those with pneumonia seen on chest radiography.
Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. All rights reserved.
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17 MeSH Terms