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No Association Between Pseudopolyps and Colorectal Neoplasia in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.
Mahmoud R, Shah SC, Ten Hove JR, Torres J, Mooiweer E, Castaneda D, Glass J, Elman J, Kumar A, Axelrad J, Ullman T, Colombel JF, Oldenburg B, Itzkowitz SH, Dutch Initiative on Crohn and Colitis
(2019) Gastroenterology 156: 1333-1344.e3
MeSH Terms: Adult, Biopsy, Colectomy, Colitis, Ulcerative, Colonic Polyps, Colonoscopy, Colorectal Neoplasms, Crohn Disease, Early Detection of Cancer, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Neoplasm Grading, Netherlands, New York City, Prevalence, Retrospective Studies, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Time Factors
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
BACKGROUND & AIMS - Patients with inflammatory bowel diseases who have postinflammatory polyps (PIPs) have an increased risk of colorectal neoplasia (CRN). European guidelines propose that patients with PIPs receive more frequent surveillance colonoscopies, despite limited evidence of this increased risk. We aimed to define the risk of CRN and colectomy in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases and PIPs.
METHODS - We conducted a multicenter retrospective cohort study of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases who underwent colonoscopic surveillance for CRN, from January 1997 through January 2017, at 5 academic hospitals and 2 large nonacademic hospitals in New York or the Netherlands. Eligible patients had confirmed colonic disease with duration of at least 8 years (or any duration, if they also had primary sclerosing cholangitis) and no history of advanced CRN (high-grade dysplasia or colorectal cancer) or colectomy. The primary outcome was occurrence of advanced CRN according to PIP status; secondary outcomes were occurrence of CRN (inclusive of low-grade dysplasia) and colectomy.
RESULTS - Of 1582 eligible patients, 462 (29.2%) had PIPs. PIPs were associated with more severe inflammation (adjusted odds ratio 1.32; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13-1.55), greater disease extent (adjusted odds ratio 1.92; 95% CI 1.34-2.74), and lower likelihood of primary sclerosing cholangitis (adjusted odds ratio 0.38; 95% CI 0.26-0.55). During a median follow-up period of 4.8 years, the time until development of advanced CRN did not differ significantly between patients with and those without PIPs. PIPs did not independently increase the risk of advanced CRN (adjusted hazard ratio 1.17; 95% CI 0.59-2.31). The colectomy rate was significantly higher in patients with PIPs (P = .01).
CONCLUSIONS - In a retrospective analysis of data from 2 large independent surveillance cohorts, PIPs were associated with greater severity and extent of colon inflammation and higher rates of colectomy, but were not associated with development of any degree of CRN. Therefore, intervals for surveillance should not be shortened based solely on the presence of PIPs.
Copyright © 2019 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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MeSH Terms
Genetic variation in SLC7A2 interacts with calcium and magnesium intakes in modulating the risk of colorectal polyps.
Sun P, Zhu X, Shrubsole MJ, Ness RM, Hibler EA, Cai Q, Long J, Chen Z, Li G, Hou L, Smalley WE, Edwards TL, Giovannucci E, Zheng W, Dai Q
(2017) J Nutr Biochem 47: 35-40
MeSH Terms: Adenoma, Amino Acid Transport Systems, Basic, Calcium, Dietary, Case-Control Studies, Colonic Polyps, Colonoscopy, Colorectal Neoplasms, Diet, Healthy, Dietary Supplements, Female, Genetic Association Studies, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Humans, Magnesium, Male, Middle Aged, Neoplasm Grading, Patient Compliance, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Self Report, Tennessee, Tumor Burden
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2018
Solute carrier family 7, member 2 (SLC7A2) gene encodes a protein called cationic amino acid transporter 2, which mediates the transport of arginine, lysine and ornithine. l-Arginine is necessary for cancer development and progression, including an important role in colorectal cancer pathogenesis. Furthermore, previous studies found that both calcium and magnesium inhibit the transport of arginine. Thus, calcium, magnesium or calcium:magnesium intake ratio may interact with polymorphisms in the SLC7A2 gene in association with colorectal cancer. We conducted a two-phase case-control study within the Tennessee Colorectal Polyps Study. In the first phase, 23 tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the SLC7A2 gene were included for 725 colorectal adenoma cases and 755 controls. In the second phase conducted in an independent set of 607 cases and 2113 controls, we replicated the significant findings in the first phase. We observed that rs2720574 significantly interacted with calcium:magnesium intake ratio in association with odds of adenoma, particularly multiple/advanced adenoma. In the combined analysis, among those with a calcium:magnesium intake ratio below 2.78, individuals who carried GC/CC genotypes demonstrated higher odds of adenoma [OR (95% CI):1.36 (1.11-1.68)] and multiple/advanced adenoma [OR (95% CI): 1.68 (1.28, 2.20)] than those who carried the GG genotype. The P values for interactions between calcium:magnesium intake ratio and rs2720574 were .002 for all adenomas and <.001 for multiple/advanced adenoma. Among those with the GG genotype, a high calcium:magnesium ratio was associated with increased odds of colorectal adenoma [OR (95% CI): 1.73 (1.27-2.36)] and advanced/multiple adenomas [1.62 (1.05-2.50)], whereas among those with the GC/CC genotypes, high calcium:magnesium ratio was related to reduced odds of colorectal adenoma [0.64 (0.42-0.99)] and advanced/multiple adenomas [0.55 (0.31-1.00)].
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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2 Members
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22 MeSH Terms
The Role of the Microbiome in Gastrointestinal Cancer.
Wroblewski LE, Peek RM, Coburn LA
(2016) Gastroenterol Clin North Am 45: 543-56
MeSH Terms: Adenocarcinoma, Animals, Carcinogenesis, Cell Proliferation, Colonic Polyps, Colorectal Neoplasms, Diet, Disease Models, Animal, Esophageal Neoplasms, Gastrointestinal Microbiome, Gastrointestinal Neoplasms, Gastrointestinal Tract, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Humans, Inflammation, Microbiota, Stem Cells, Stomach Neoplasms
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2017
Humans are host to complex microbial communities previously termed normal flora and largely overlooked. However, resident microbes contribute to both health and disease. Investigators are beginning to define microbes that contribute to the development of gastrointestinal malignancies and the mechanisms by which this occurs. Resident microbes can induce inflammation, leading to cell proliferation and altered stem cell dynamics, which can lead to alterations in DNA integrity and immune regulation and promote carcinogenesis. Studies in human patients and rodent models of cancer have identified alterations in the microbiota of the stomach, esophagus, and colon that increase the risk for malignancy.
Published by Elsevier Inc.
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19 MeSH Terms
Colorectal Cancer Risk Following Adenoma Removal: A Large Prospective Population-Based Cohort Study.
Coleman HG, Loughrey MB, Murray LJ, Johnston BT, Gavin AT, Shrubsole MJ, Bhat SK, Allen PB, McConnell V, Cantwell MM
(2015) Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 24: 1373-80
MeSH Terms: Adenoma, Adolescent, Adult, Age Factors, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Colonic Neoplasms, Colonic Polyps, Colonoscopy, Female, Humans, Incidence, Male, Middle Aged, Northern Ireland, Proportional Hazards Models, Prospective Studies, Rectal Neoplasms, Risk Factors, Sex Factors, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added September 28, 2015
BACKGROUND - Randomized controlled trials have demonstrated significant reductions in colorectal cancer incidence and mortality associated with polypectomy. However, little is known about whether polypectomy is effective at reducing colorectal cancer risk in routine clinical practice. The aim of this investigation was to quantify colorectal cancer risk following polypectomy in a large prospective population-based cohort study.
METHODS - Patients with incident colorectal polyps between 2000 and 2005 in Northern Ireland were identified via electronic pathology reports received to the Northern Ireland Cancer Registry. Patients were matched to the Northern Ireland Cancer Registry to detect colorectal cancer and deaths up to December 31, 2010. Colorectal cancer standardized incidence ratios (SIR) were calculated and Cox proportional hazards modeling applied to determine colorectal cancer risk.
RESULTS - During 44,724 person-years of follow-up, 193 colorectal cancer cases were diagnosed among 6,972 adenoma patients, representing an annual progression rate of 0.43%. Colorectal cancer risk was significantly elevated in patients who had an adenoma removed (SIR, 2.85; 95% CI, 2.61-3.25) compared with the general population. Male sex, older age, rectal site, and villous architecture were associated with an increased colorectal cancer risk in adenoma patients. Further analysis suggested that not having a full colonoscopy performed at, or following, incident polypectomy contributed to the excess colorectal cancer risk.
CONCLUSIONS - Colorectal cancer risk was elevated in individuals following polypectomy for adenoma, outside of screening programs.
IMPACT - This finding emphasizes the need for full colonoscopy and adenoma clearance, and appropriate surveillance, after endoscopic diagnosis of adenoma.
©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.
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1 Members
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21 MeSH Terms
Accuracy of capsule colonoscopy in detecting colorectal polyps in a screening population.
Rex DK, Adler SN, Aisenberg J, Burch WC, Carretero C, Chowers Y, Fein SA, Fern SE, Fernandez-Urien Sainz I, Fich A, Gal E, Horlander JC, Isaacs KL, Kariv R, Lahat A, Leung WK, Malik PR, Morgan D, Papageorgiou N, Romeo DP, Shah SS, Waterman M
(2015) Gastroenterology 148: 948-957.e2
MeSH Terms: Adenomatous Polyps, Capsule Endoscopy, Colonic Polyps, Colonoscopy, Colorectal Neoplasms, False Negative Reactions, Female, Humans, Hyperplasia, Intestinal Polyps, Israel, Male, Mass Screening, Middle Aged, Predictive Value of Tests, Prospective Studies, Rectal Diseases, Tumor Burden, United States
Show Abstract · Added May 18, 2016
BACKGROUND & AIMS - Capsule colonoscopy is a minimally invasive imaging method. We measured the accuracy of this technology in detecting polyps 6 mm or larger in an average-risk screening population.
METHODS - In a prospective study, asymptomatic subjects (n = 884) underwent capsule colonoscopy followed by conventional colonoscopy (the reference) several weeks later, with an endoscopist blinded to capsule results, at 10 centers in the United States and 6 centers in Israel from June 2011 through April 2012. An unblinded colonoscopy was performed on subjects found to have lesions 6 mm or larger by capsule but not conventional colonoscopy.
RESULTS - Among the 884 subjects enrolled, 695 (79%) were included in the analysis of capsule performance for all polyps. There were 77 exclusions (9%) for inadequate cleansing and whole-colon capsule transit time fewer than 40 minutes, 45 exclusions (5%) before capsule ingestion, 15 exclusions (2%) after ingestion and before colonoscopy, and 15 exclusions (2%) for site termination. Capsule colonoscopy identified subjects with 1 or more polyps 6 mm or larger with 81% sensitivity (95% confidence interval [CI], 77%-84%) and 93% specificity (95% CI, 91%-95%), and polyps 10 mm or larger with 80% sensitivity (95% CI, 74%-86%) and 97% specificity (95% CI, 96%-98%). Capsule colonoscopy identified subjects with 1 or more conventional adenomas 6 mm or larger with 88% sensitivity (95% CI, 82%-93) and 82% specificity (95% CI, 80%-83%), and 10 mm or larger with 92% sensitivity (95% CI, 82%-97%) and 95% specificity (95% CI, 94%-95%). Sessile serrated polyps and hyperplastic polyps accounted for 26% and 37%, respectively, of false-negative findings from capsule analyses.
CONCLUSIONS - In an average-risk screening population, technically adequate capsule colonoscopy identified individuals with 1 or more conventional adenomas 6 mm or larger with 88% sensitivity and 82% specificity. Capsule performance seems adequate for patients who cannot undergo colonoscopy or who had incomplete colonoscopies. Additional studies are needed to improve capsule detection of serrated lesions. Clinicaltrials.gov number: NCT01372878.
Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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1 Members
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19 MeSH Terms
Associations between dietary fiber and colorectal polyp risk differ by polyp type and smoking status.
Fu Z, Shrubsole MJ, Smalley WE, Ness RM, Zheng W
(2014) J Nutr 144: 592-8
MeSH Terms: Adenomatous Polyps, Adult, Aged, Case-Control Studies, Colonic Polyps, Colonoscopy, Colorectal Neoplasms, Dietary Fiber, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Precancerous Conditions, Risk Factors, Risk Reduction Behavior, Smoking, Tennessee
Show Abstract · Added March 10, 2014
The association of dietary fiber intake with colorectal cancer risk is established. However, the association may differ between cigarette smokers and nonsmokers. We evaluated this hypothesis in a large colonoscopy-based case-control study. Dietary fiber intakes were estimated by self-administered food frequency questionnaire. Unconditional logistic regression analysis was used to estimate ORs and 95% CIs with adjustment for potential confounders. Analysis also was stratified by cigarette smoking and sex. High dietary fiber intake was associated with reduced risk of colorectal polyps (P-trend = 0.003). This association was found to be stronger among cigarette smokers (P-trend = 0.006) than nonsmokers (P-trend = 0.21), although the test for multiplicative interaction was not statistically significant (P = 0.11). This pattern of association was more evident for high-risk adenomatous polyps (ADs), defined as advanced or multiple ADs (P-interaction smoking and dietary fiber intake = 0.09). Among cigarette smokers who smoked ≥23 y, a 38% reduced risk of high-risk ADs was found to be associated with high intake of dietary fiber compared with those in the lowest quartile fiber intake group (P-trend = 0.004). No inverse association with dietary fiber intake was observed for low-risk ADs, defined as single nonadvanced ADs. Cigarette smoking may modify the association of dietary fiber intake with the risk of colorectal polyps, especially high-risk ADs, a well-established precursor of colorectal cancer.
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17 MeSH Terms
Interaction of cigarette smoking and carcinogen-metabolizing polymorphisms in the risk of colorectal polyps.
Fu Z, Shrubsole MJ, Li G, Smalley WE, Hein DW, Cai Q, Ness RM, Zheng W
(2013) Carcinogenesis 34: 779-86
MeSH Terms: Adenoma, Adult, Aged, Carcinogens, Case-Control Studies, Colonic Polyps, Colorectal Neoplasms, Disease Susceptibility, Enzymes, Female, Genotype, Humans, Hyperplasia, Interviews as Topic, Male, Middle Aged, Polymorphism, Genetic, Risk, Risk Factors, Smoking, Tobacco, Tobacco Smoke Pollution
Show Abstract · Added March 7, 2014
The causal role of cigarette smoking in the risk of colorectal neoplasm has been suggested but not established. In a case-control study including 2060 colorectal polyp patients and 3336 polyp-free controls, we evaluated 21 functional genetic variants to construct a tobacco-carcinogen-metabolizing genetic risk score. Data regarding cigarette smoking were obtained through telephone interviews. Cigarette smoking was associated with an elevated risk of both adenomas and hyperplastic polyps. The association with smoking was stronger in participants with a high carcinogen-metabolizing risk score than those with a low risk score. Smoking 30 or more cigarettes per day was associated with a 1.7-fold elevated risk of any polyps (95% confidence interval = 1.3-2.2) among those with a low genetic risk score and 2.9-fold elevated risk (95% confidence interval = 1.8-4.8) among those with a high genetic risk score (P interaction = 0.025). A similar pattern of interaction was observed in analyses conducted separately for those with adenomas only (P interaction = 0.039) and hyperplastic polyps only (P interaction = 0.024). Interaction between carcinogen-metabolizing genetic risk and cigarette smoking was found in relation to high-risk adenomas (P interaction = 0.010) but not low-risk adenomas (P interaction = 0.791). No apparent interaction was found for duration of smoking. This study shows that the association between cigarette smoking and colorectal polyp risk is modified by tobacco-carcinogen-metabolizing polymorphisms, providing support for a causal role of cigarette smoking in the etiology of colorectal tumors.
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4 Members
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22 MeSH Terms
Lifestyle factors and their combined impact on the risk of colorectal polyps.
Fu Z, Shrubsole MJ, Smalley WE, Wu H, Chen Z, Shyr Y, Ness RM, Zheng W
(2012) Am J Epidemiol 176: 766-76
MeSH Terms: Adenomatous Polyps, Aged, Alcohol Drinking, Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal, Body Mass Index, Case-Control Studies, Colon, Colonic Polyps, Colonoscopy, Diet, Educational Status, Exercise, Female, Health Behavior, Humans, Hyperplasia, Life Style, Male, Middle Aged, Rectum, Risk Factors, Smoking
Show Abstract · Added March 7, 2014
Understanding patterns of shared and type-specific etiologies for colorectal polyps may provide insights into colorectal carcinogenesis. The authors present the first systematic comparison of risk factors by colorectal polyp type in a large colonoscopy-based case-control study of 3,764 polyp-free controls and 2,543 polyp patients, including 1,444 cases with adenomas only, 662 cases with hyperplastic polyps (HPPs) only, and 437 cases with synchronous HPPs and adenomas. Surveys were completed to obtain information on usual dietary intake and other lifestyle factors. Six lifestyle factors, including cigarette smoking, obesity, no regular use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, high intake of red meat, low intake of fiber, and low intake of calcium, were found to be independently associated with the risk of polyps. The risk of polyps increased progressively with an increasing number of adverse lifestyle factors. Compared with participants with no or only 1 risk factor, odds ratios for those with 5 to 6 risk factors were 2.72 (95% confidence interval: 1.94, 3.79) for adenoma only, 4.12 (95% confidence interval: 2.78, 6.09) for HPPs only, and 9.03 (95% confidence interval: 5.69, 14.34) for synchronous HPPs and adenomas. This study provides strong evidence that lifestyle modification is important for the prevention of colorectal polyps, especially advanced and multiple adenomas, which are established precursors of colorectal cancer.
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4 Members
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22 MeSH Terms
Association of genetic variants for colorectal cancer differs by subtypes of polyps in the colorectum.
Zhang B, Shrubsole MJ, Li G, Cai Q, Edwards T, Smalley WE, Ness RM, Zheng W
(2012) Carcinogenesis 33: 2417-23
MeSH Terms: Aged, Case-Control Studies, Colonic Polyps, Colorectal Neoplasms, Female, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genetic Variation, Genome-Wide Association Study, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Risk
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
Most colorectal cancers originate from polyps, however, only a small proportion of polyps progress to carcinomas. Genome-wide association studies have identified multiple single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in relation to colorectal cancer. Using these genetic risk variants, we evaluated whether colorectal cancer genetic factors may determine certain polyp phenotypes with different malignant potential. We analyzed 20 SNPs in 15 colorectal cancer susceptibility loci in a case-control study including 2473 cases (1831 with adenomas and 642 with hyperplastic polyps only) and 4019 controls. These patients were recruited from participants who received colonoscopy at two major hospitals in Nashville. A weighted genetic risk score (wGRS) was created to measure the cumulative association of multiple SNPs with polyp subtypes. Thirteen SNPs in 10 loci showed a statistically significant (P < 0.05, n = 9) or marginally significant (P < 0.10, n = 4) association with the risk of adenomas or hyperplastic polyps in the same direction as reported previously for colorectal cancer. A dose-response relation was observed between the wGRS and adenoma risk [per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.15, 95 confidence interval (CI): 1.10-1.20, P (trend) = 7.3×10(-10)], with the association stronger for advanced than non-advanced adenomas (P (heterogeneity) = 0.038), for multiple adenomas than a single adenoma (P (heterogeneity) = 0.039), and for proximal than distal adenomas (P (heterogeneity) = 0.038) and for adenomas diagnosed at younger than older age (P (heterogeneity) = 0.031). A similar, but weak association between the wGRS and hyperplastic polyps was also observed (OR = 1.11, 95% CI: 1.04-1.18, P (trend) = 0.002). These findings suggest that genetic factors play a significant role in the development of polyps with different malignant potential.
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5 Members
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13 MeSH Terms
Using gene-environment interaction analyses to clarify the role of well-done meat and heterocyclic amine exposure in the etiology of colorectal polyps.
Fu Z, Shrubsole MJ, Li G, Smalley WE, Hein DW, Chen Z, Shyr Y, Cai Q, Ness RM, Zheng W
(2012) Am J Clin Nutr 96: 1119-28
MeSH Terms: Adenoma, Adult, Aged, Alleles, Amines, Animals, Case-Control Studies, Colonic Polyps, Colorectal Neoplasms, DNA, Neoplasm, Female, Gene-Environment Interaction, Humans, Male, Meat, Middle Aged, Polymerase Chain Reaction, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Risk Factors
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
BACKGROUND - The role of well-done meat intake and meat-derived mutagen heterocyclic amine (HCA) exposure in the risk of colorectal neoplasm has been suggested but not yet established.
OBJECTIVE - With the use of gene-environment interaction analyses, we sought to clarify the association of HCA exposure with colorectal polyp risk.
DESIGN - In a case-control study including 2057 colorectal polyp patients and 3329 controls, we evaluated 16 functional genetic variants to construct an HCA-metabolizing score. To derive dietary HCA-exposure amount, data were collected regarding dietary intake of meat by cooking method and degree of doneness.
RESULTS - A 2-fold elevated risk associated with high red meat intake was found for colorectal polyps or adenomas in subjects with a high HCA-metabolizing risk score, whereas the risk was 1.3- to 1.4-fold among those with a low risk score (P-interaction ≤ 0.05). The interaction was stronger for the risk of advanced or multiple adenomas, in which an OR of 2.8 (95% CI: 1.8, 4.6) was observed for those with both a high HCA-risk score and high red meat intake (P-interaction = 0.01). No statistically significant interaction was found in analyses that used specific HCA exposure derived from dietary data.
CONCLUSION - High red meat intake is associated with an elevated risk of colorectal polyps, and this association may be synergistically modified by genetic factors involved in HCA metabolism.
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5 Members
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19 MeSH Terms