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Association of smoking with abdominal adipose deposition and muscle composition in Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) participants at mid-life: A population-based cohort study.
Terry JG, Hartley KG, Steffen LM, Nair S, Alman AC, Wellons MF, Jacobs DR, Tindle HA, Carr JJ
(2020) PLoS Med 17: e1003223
MeSH Terms: Abdominal Fat, Adiposity, Adult, Blood Pressure, Body Mass Index, Cohort Studies, Female, Humans, Intra-Abdominal Fat, Life Style, Male, Middle Aged, Muscle, Skeletal, Obesity, Abdominal, Risk Factors, Smoking, Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Show Abstract · Added July 28, 2020
BACKGROUND - Smokers have lower risk of obesity, which some consider a "beneficial" side effect of smoking. However, some studies suggest that smoking is simultaneously associated with higher central adiposity and, more specifically, ectopic adipose deposition. Little is known about the association of smoking with intermuscular adipose tissue (IMAT), an ectopic adipose depot associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk and a key determinant of muscle quality and function. We tested the hypothesis that smokers have higher abdominal IMAT and lower lean muscle quality than never smokers.
METHODS AND FINDINGS - We measured abdominal muscle total, lean, and adipose volumes (in cubic centimeters) and attenuation (in Hounsfield units [HU]) along with subcutaneous (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) volumes using computed tomography (CT) in 3,020 middle-aged Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) participants (age 42-58, 56.3% women, 52.6% white race) at the year 25 (Y25) visit. The longitudinal CARDIA study was initiated in 1985 with the recruitment of young adult participants (aged 18-30 years) equally balanced by female and male sex and black and white race at 4 field centers located in Birmingham, AL, Chicago, IL, Minneapolis, MN, and Oakland, CA. Multivariable linear models included potential confounders such as physical activity and dietary habits along with traditional CVD risk factors. Current smokers had lower BMI than never smokers. Nevertheless, in the fully adjusted multivariable model with potential confounders, including BMI and CVD risk factors, adjusted mean (95% CI) IMAT volume was 2.66 (2.55-2.76) cm3 in current smokers (n = 524), 2.36 (2.29-2.43) cm3 in former smokers (n = 944), and 2.23 (2.18-2.29) cm3 in never smokers (n = 1,552) (p = 0.007 for comparison of former versus never smoker, and p < 0.001 for comparison of current smoker versus never and former smoker). Moreover, compared to participants who never smoked throughout life (41.6 [41.3-41.9] HU), current smokers (40.4 [39.9-40.9] HU) and former smokers (40.8 [40.5-41.2] HU) had lower lean muscle attenuation suggesting lower muscle quality in the fully adjusted model (p < 0.001 for comparison of never smokers with either of the other two strata). Among participants who had ever smoked, pack-years of smoking exposure were directly associated with IMAT volume (β [95% CI]: 0.017 [0.010-0.025]) (p < 0.001). Despite having less SAT, current smokers also had higher VAT/SAT ratio than never smokers. These findings must be viewed with caution as residual confounding and/or reverse causation may contribute to these associations.
CONCLUSIONS - We found that, compared to those who never smoked, current and former smokers had abdominal muscle composition that was higher in adipose tissue volume, a finding consistent with higher CVD risk and age-related physical deconditioning. These findings challenge the belief that smoking-associated weight loss or maintenance confers a health benefit.
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Predictive Accuracy of a Polygenic Risk Score Compared With a Clinical Risk Score for Incident Coronary Heart Disease.
Mosley JD, Gupta DK, Tan J, Yao J, Wells QS, Shaffer CM, Kundu S, Robinson-Cohen C, Psaty BM, Rich SS, Post WS, Guo X, Rotter JI, Roden DM, Gerszten RE, Wang TJ
(2020) JAMA 323: 627-635
MeSH Terms: Aged, Cohort Studies, Coronary Disease, Female, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genome-Wide Association Study, Genotype, Humans, Incidence, Male, Middle Aged, Multifactorial Inheritance, Myocardial Infarction, Odds Ratio, Phenotype, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Predictive Value of Tests, Proportional Hazards Models, Retrospective Studies, Risk, Risk Assessment
Show Abstract · Added March 24, 2020
Importance - Polygenic risk scores comprising millions of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) could be useful for population-wide coronary heart disease (CHD) screening.
Objective - To determine whether a polygenic risk score improves prediction of CHD compared with a guideline-recommended clinical risk equation.
Design, Setting, and Participants - A retrospective cohort study of the predictive accuracy of a previously validated polygenic risk score was assessed among 4847 adults of white European ancestry, aged 45 through 79 years, participating in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study and 2390 participating in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) from 1996 through December 31, 2015, the final day of follow-up. The performance of the polygenic risk score was compared with that of the 2013 American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association pooled cohort equations.
Exposures - Genetic risk was computed for each participant by summing the product of the weights and allele dosage across 6 630 149 SNPs. Weights were based on an international genome-wide association study.
Main Outcomes and Measures - Prediction of 10-year first CHD events (including myocardial infarctions, fatal coronary events, silent infarctions, revascularization procedures, or resuscitated cardiac arrest) assessed using measures of model discrimination, calibration, and net reclassification improvement (NRI).
Results - The study population included 4847 adults from the ARIC study (mean [SD] age, 62.9 [5.6] years; 56.4% women) and 2390 adults from the MESA cohort (mean [SD] age, 61.8 [9.6] years; 52.2% women). Incident CHD events occurred in 696 participants (14.4%) and 227 participants (9.5%), respectively, over median follow-up of 15.5 years (interquartile range [IQR], 6.3 years) and 14.2 (IQR, 2.5 years) years. The polygenic risk score was significantly associated with 10-year CHD incidence in ARIC with hazard ratios per SD increment of 1.24 (95% CI, 1.15 to 1.34) and in MESA, 1.38 (95% CI, 1.21 to 1.58). Addition of the polygenic risk score to the pooled cohort equations did not significantly increase the C statistic in either cohort (ARIC, change in C statistic, -0.001; 95% CI, -0.009 to 0.006; MESA, 0.021; 95% CI, -0.0004 to 0.043). At the 10-year risk threshold of 7.5%, the addition of the polygenic risk score to the pooled cohort equations did not provide significant improvement in reclassification in either ARIC (NRI, 0.018, 95% CI, -0.012 to 0.036) or MESA (NRI, 0.001, 95% CI, -0.038 to 0.076). The polygenic risk score did not significantly improve calibration in either cohort.
Conclusions and Relevance - In this analysis of 2 cohorts of US adults, the polygenic risk score was associated with incident coronary heart disease events but did not significantly improve discrimination, calibration, or risk reclassification compared with conventional predictors. These findings suggest that a polygenic risk score may not enhance risk prediction in a general, white middle-aged population.
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Immune repertoire fingerprinting by principal component analysis reveals shared features in subject groups with common exposures.
Sevy AM, Soto C, Bombardi RG, Meiler J, Crowe JE
(2019) BMC Bioinformatics 20: 629
MeSH Terms: Adult, Antibodies, Cohort Studies, Fetal Blood, HIV Infections, High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing, Humans, Influenza, Human, Middle Aged, Principal Component Analysis, Vaccination
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2020
BACKGROUND - Advances in next-generation sequencing (NGS) of antibody repertoires have led to an explosion in B cell receptor sequence data from donors with many different disease states. These data have the potential to detect patterns of immune response across populations. However, to this point it has been difficult to interpret such patterns of immune response between disease states in the absence of functional data. There is a need for a robust method that can be used to distinguish general patterns of immune responses at the antibody repertoire level.
RESULTS - We developed a method for reducing the complexity of antibody repertoire datasets using principal component analysis (PCA) and refer to our method as "repertoire fingerprinting." We reduce the high dimensional space of an antibody repertoire to just two principal components that explain the majority of variation in those repertoires. We show that repertoires from individuals with a common experience or disease state can be clustered by their repertoire fingerprints to identify common antibody responses.
CONCLUSIONS - Our repertoire fingerprinting method for distinguishing immune repertoires has implications for characterizing an individual disease state. Methods to distinguish disease states based on pattern recognition in the adaptive immune response could be used to develop biomarkers with diagnostic or prognostic utility in patient care. Extending our analysis to larger cohorts of patients in the future should permit us to define more precisely those characteristics of the immune response that result from natural infection or autoimmunity.
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CYP2C19 Phenotype and Risk of Proton Pump Inhibitor-Associated Infections.
Bernal CJ, Aka I, Carroll RJ, Coco JR, Lima JJ, Acra SA, Roden DM, Van Driest SL
(2019) Pediatrics 144:
MeSH Terms: Cohort Studies, Cytochrome P-450 CYP2C19, Female, Humans, Infant, Infections, Male, Phenotype, Proton Pump Inhibitors, Retrospective Studies, Risk Factors
Show Abstract · Added March 24, 2020
OBJECTIVES - Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are often used in pediatrics to treat common gastrointestinal disorders, and there are growing concerns for infectious adverse events. Because CYP2C19 inactivates PPIs, genetic variants that increase CYP2C19 function may decrease PPI exposure and infections. We tested the hypothesis that CYP2C19 metabolizer phenotypes are associated with infection event rates in children exposed to PPIs.
METHODS - This retrospective biorepository cohort study included individuals aged 0 to 36 months at the time of PPI exposure. Respiratory tract and gastrointestinal tract infection events were identified by using codes in the year after the first PPI mention. Variants defining , , , , , and were genotyped, and all individuals were classified as CYP2C19 poor or intermediate, normal metabolizers (NMs), or rapid or ultrarapid metabolizers (RM/UMs). Infection rates were compared by using univariate and multivariate analyses.
RESULTS - In all, 670 individuals were included (median age 7 months; 44% girls). CYP2C19 NMs ( = 267; 40%) had a higher infection rate than RM/UMs ( = 220; 33%; median 2 vs 1 infections per person per year; = .03). There was no difference between poor or intermediate ( = 183; 27%) and NMs. In multivariable analysis of NMs and RM/UMs adjusting for age, sex, PPI dose, and comorbidities, CYP2C19 metabolizer status remained a significant risk factor for infection events (odds ratio 0.70 [95% confidence interval 0.50-0.97] for RM/UMs versus NMs).
CONCLUSIONS - PPI therapy is associated with higher infection rates in children with normal CYP2C19 function than in those with increased CYP2C19 function, highlighting this adverse effect of PPI therapy and the relevance of genotypes to PPI therapeutic decision-making.
Copyright © 2019 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.
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Sex differences in the genetic predictors of Alzheimer's pathology.
Dumitrescu L, Barnes LL, Thambisetty M, Beecham G, Kunkle B, Bush WS, Gifford KA, Chibnik LB, Mukherjee S, De Jager PL, Kukull W, Crane PK, Resnick SM, Keene CD, Montine TJ, Schellenberg GD, Deming Y, Chao MJ, Huentelman M, Martin ER, Hamilton-Nelson K, Shaw LM, Trojanowski JQ, Peskind ER, Cruchaga C, Pericak-Vance MA, Goate AM, Cox NJ, Haines JL, Zetterberg H, Blennow K, Larson EB, Johnson SC, Albert M, Alzheimer’s Disease Genetics Consortium and the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative, Bennett DA, Schneider JA, Jefferson AL, Hohman TJ
(2019) Brain 142: 2581-2589
MeSH Terms: Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Alzheimer Disease, Amyloid beta-Peptides, Cohort Studies, Female, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genome-Wide Association Study, Humans, Male, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Sex Characteristics, tau Proteins
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2020
Autopsy measures of Alzheimer's disease neuropathology have been leveraged as endophenotypes in previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, despite evidence of sex differences in Alzheimer's disease risk, sex-stratified models have not been incorporated into previous GWAS analyses. We looked for sex-specific genetic associations with Alzheimer's disease endophenotypes from six brain bank data repositories. The pooled dataset included 2701 males and 3275 females, the majority of whom were diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease at autopsy (70%). Sex-stratified GWAS were performed within each dataset and then meta-analysed. Loci that reached genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10-8) in stratified models were further assessed for sex interactions. Additional analyses were performed in independent datasets leveraging cognitive, neuroimaging and CSF endophenotypes, along with age-at-onset data. Outside of the APOE region, one locus on chromosome 7 (rs34331204) showed a sex-specific association with neurofibrillary tangles among males (P = 2.5 × 10-8) but not females (P = 0.85, sex-interaction P = 2.9 × 10-4). In follow-up analyses, rs34331204 was also associated with hippocampal volume, executive function, and age-at-onset only among males. These results implicate a novel locus that confers male-specific protection from tau pathology and highlight the value of assessing genetic associations in a sex-specific manner.
© The Author(s) (2019). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.
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13 MeSH Terms
is associated with indomethacin treatment failure for patent ductus arteriosus.
Rooney SR, Shelton EL, Aka I, Shaffer CM, Clyman RI, Dagle JM, Ryckman K, Lewis TR, Reese J, Van Driest SL, Kannankeril PJ
(2019) Pharmacogenomics 20: 939-946
MeSH Terms: Cohort Studies, Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors, Cytochrome P-450 CYP2C9, Ductus Arteriosus, Patent, Female, Gestational Age, Humans, Indomethacin, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Infant, Premature, Male, Treatment Failure, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added July 28, 2020
To identify clinical andgenetic factors associated with indomethacin treatment failure in preterm neonates with patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). This is a multicenter cohort study of 144 preterm infants (22-32 weeks gestational age) at three centers who received at least one treatment course of indomethacin for PDA. Indomethacin failure was defined as requiring subsequent surgical intervention. In multivariate analysis, gestational age (AOR 0.76, 95% CI 0.60-0.96), surfactant use (AOR 9.77, 95% CI 1.15-83.26), and (AOR 3.74; 95% CI 1.34-10.44) were each associated with indomethacin failure. Age, surfactant use, and influence indomethacin treatment outcome in preterm infants with PDA. This combination of clinical and genetic factors may facilitate targeted indomethacin use for PDA.
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Left Ventricular Mass at MRI and Long-term Risk of Cardiovascular Events: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA).
Kawel-Boehm N, Kronmal R, Eng J, Folsom A, Burke G, Carr JJ, Shea S, Lima JAC, Bluemke DA
(2019) Radiology 293: 107-114
MeSH Terms: Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Atherosclerosis, Cohort Studies, Comorbidity, Ethnic Groups, Female, Heart Failure, Heart Ventricles, Humans, Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Myocardial Infarction, Prospective Studies, Risk, Risk Factors, United States
Show Abstract · Added January 10, 2020
Background Few data exist on the long-term risk prediction of elevated left ventricular (LV) mass quantified by MRI for cardiovascular (CV) events in a contemporary, ethnically diverse cohort. Purpose To assess the long-term impact of elevated LV mass on CV events in a prospective cohort study of a multiethnic population in relationship to risk factors and coronary artery calcium (CAC) score. Materials and Methods The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, or MESA (: NCT00005487), is an ongoing prospective multicenter population-based study in the United States. A total of 6814 participants (age range, 45-84 years) free of clinical CV disease at baseline were enrolled between 2000 and 2002. In 4988 participants (2613 [52.4%] women; mean age, 62 years ± 10.1 [standard deviation]) followed over 15 years for CV events, LV mass was derived from cardiac MRI at baseline enrollment by using semiautomated software at a central core laboratory. Cox proportional hazard models, Kaplan-Meier curves, and scores were applied to assess the impact of LV hypertrophy. Results A total of 290 participants had hard coronary heart disease (CHD) events (207 myocardial infarctions [MIs], 95 CHD deaths), 57 had other CV disease-related deaths, and 215 had heart failure (HF). LV hypertrophy was an independent predictor of hard CHD events (hazard ratio [HR]: 2.7; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.9, 3.8), MI (HR: 2.8; 95% CI: 1.8, 4.0), CHD death (HR: 4.3; 95% CI: 2.5, 7.3), other CV death (HR: 7.5; 95% CI: 4.2, 13.5), and HF (HR: 5.4; 95% CI: 3.8, 7.5) ( < .001 for all end points). LV hypertrophy was a stronger predictor than CAC for CHD death, other CV death, and HF ( scores: 5.4 vs 3.4, 6.8 vs 2.4, and 9.7 vs 3.2 for LV hypertrophy vs CAC, respectively). Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated an increased risk of CV events in participants with LV hypertrophy, particularly after 5 years. Conclusion Elevated left ventricular mass was strongly associated with hard coronary heart disease events, other cardiovascular death, and heart failure over 15 years of follow-up, independent of traditional risk factors and coronary artery calcium score. © RSNA, 2019 See also the editorial by Hanneman in this issue.
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19 MeSH Terms
Mapping eGFR loci to the renal transcriptome and phenome in the VA Million Veteran Program.
Hellwege JN, Velez Edwards DR, Giri A, Qiu C, Park J, Torstenson ES, Keaton JM, Wilson OD, Robinson-Cohen C, Chung CP, Roumie CL, Klarin D, Damrauer SM, DuVall SL, Siew E, Akwo EA, Wuttke M, Gorski M, Li M, Li Y, Gaziano JM, Wilson PWF, Tsao PS, O'Donnell CJ, Kovesdy CP, Pattaro C, Köttgen A, Susztak K, Edwards TL, Hung AM
(2019) Nat Commun 10: 3842
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Animals, Cell Line, Chromosome Mapping, Cohort Studies, Computational Biology, Female, Genetic Loci, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genome-Wide Association Study, Glomerular Filtration Rate, Humans, Kidney, Male, Mice, Middle Aged, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, RNA-Seq, Renal Insufficiency, Chronic, Transcriptome, United States, United States Department of Veterans Affairs, Veterans
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Chronic kidney disease (CKD), defined by low estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), contributes to global morbidity and mortality. Here we conduct a transethnic Genome-Wide Association Study of eGFR in 280,722 participants of the Million Veteran Program (MVP), with replication in 765,289 participants from the Chronic Kidney Disease Genetics (CKDGen) Consortium. We identify 82 previously unreported variants, confirm 54 loci, and report interesting findings including association of the sickle cell allele of betaglobin among non-Hispanic blacks. Our transcriptome-wide association study of kidney function in healthy kidney tissue identifies 36 previously unreported and nine known genes, and maps gene expression to renal cell types. In a Phenome-Wide Association Study in 192,868 MVP participants using a weighted genetic score we detect associations with CKD stages and complications and kidney stones. This investigation reinterprets the genetic architecture of kidney function to identify the gene, tissue, and anatomical context of renal homeostasis and the clinical consequences of dysregulation.
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Impact of Abdominal Obesity on Proximal and Distal Aorta Wall Thickness in African Americans: The Jackson Heart Study.
Mzayek F, Wang LE, Relyea G, Yu X, Terry JG, Carr J, Hundley GW, Hall ME, Correa A
(2019) Obesity (Silver Spring) 27: 1527-1532
MeSH Terms: African Americans, Carotid Intima-Media Thickness, Cohort Studies, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Obesity, Abdominal, Risk Factors
Show Abstract · Added July 23, 2019
OBJECTIVE - Abdominal obesity and wall thickness of the central arteries have been associated with higher risk of cardiovascular disease. Despite the higher burden of overweight and cardiovascular disease among African Americans, limited data are available on the association of abdominal obesity with aortic wall thickness in African Americans. We assessed the cross-sectional and the longitudinal associations of abdominal obesity with aortic intima-media thickness (aIMT) in a cohort of African Americans from the Jackson Heart Study.
METHODS - Data on aIMT and repeated measures of waist circumference (WC) and waist to height ratio from 1,572 participants, as well as on abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT), visceral adipose tissue (VAT), and aIMT from 1,223 participants, were analyzed. aIMT was measured at proximal ascending aorta (PA-aIMT), proximal descending aorta (PD-aIMT), and distal aorta (bifurcation) using cardiac magnetic resonance. SAT and VAT were measured using computerized tomography.
RESULTS - WC and WHtR were longitudinally associated with PA-aIMT and PD-aIMT; SAT and VAT were associated with PA-aIMT only. Only WC was associated with distal aIMT.
CONCLUSIONS - Abdominal obesity measures are associated with increased proximal aIMT in adult African Americans. Only WC is associated with wall thickness in all three segments of the aorta.
© 2019 The Obesity Society.
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10 MeSH Terms
High and variable population prevalence of HLA-B*56:02 in indigenous Australians and relation to phenytoin-associated drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms.
Somogyi AA, Barratt DT, Phillips EJ, Moore K, Ilyas F, Gabb GM
(2019) Br J Clin Pharmacol 85: 2163-2169
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Australia, Biological Variation, Population, Cohort Studies, Cytochrome P-450 CYP2C9, Drug Hypersensitivity Syndrome, Female, Gene Frequency, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genotyping Techniques, HLA-B Antigens, Humans, Indigenous Peoples, Male, Middle Aged, Phenytoin, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2020
Phenytoin drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) in 3 Aboriginal Australians positive for HLA-B*56:02 has been previously reported. We report the allele frequency of HLA-B*56:02 in 2 South Australian populations, 1 Aboriginal (4.8%, 95% confidence interval 2.4-7.8%) and the other European (0%). We compared the frequency with publicly available information on HLA-B*56:02 status in other Indigenous Australian (n = 4) and European Australian cohorts (n = 1). In the Indigenous Australian cohorts, HLA-B*56:02 allele frequency ranged from 1.3 to 19%. We also describe an additional case of phenytoin DRESS (RegiSCAR DRESS score 7) in an Aboriginal Australian that was associated with HLA-B*56:02 and with CYP2C9*1/*3 genotype. In Aboriginal Australians, phenytoin DRESS appears distinctly linked to HLA-B*56:02 with an allele carriage rate substantially higher than in Europeans, but also with considerable regional variation. Investigations of human leucocyte antigen and other contributing genes and severe adverse drug reactions in understudied non-European populations are required to optimize safe medication use and inform risk mitigation strategies.
© 2019 The British Pharmacological Society.
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