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Pancreas Volume Declines During the First Year After Diagnosis of Type 1 Diabetes and Exhibits Altered Diffusion at Disease Onset.
Virostko J, Williams J, Hilmes M, Bowman C, Wright JJ, Du L, Kang H, Russell WE, Powers AC, Moore DJ
(2019) Diabetes Care 42: 248-257
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Atrophy, Autoantibodies, Case-Control Studies, Child, Child, Preschool, Cohort Studies, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1, Female, Glucose Tolerance Test, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Organ Size, Pancreas, Time Factors, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added December 18, 2018
OBJECTIVE - This study investigated the temporal dynamics of pancreas volume and microstructure in children and adolescents with recent-onset type 1 diabetes (T1D) and individuals without diabetes, including a subset expressing autoantibodies associated with the early stages of T1D.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - MRI was performed in individuals with recent-onset stage 3 T1D ( = 51; median age 13 years) within 100 days after diagnosis (mean 67 days), 6 months, and 1 year postdiagnosis. Longitudinal MRI measurements were also made in similarly aged control participants ( = 57) and in autoantibody-positive individuals without diabetes ( = 20). The MRI protocol consisted of anatomical imaging to determine pancreas volume and quantitative MRI protocols interrogating tissue microstructure and composition.
RESULTS - Within 100 days of diabetes onset, individuals with T1D had a smaller pancreas (median volume 28.6 mL) than control participants (median volume 48.4 mL; < 0.001), including when normalized by individual weight ( < 0.001). Longitudinal measurements of pancreas volume increased in control participants over the year, consistent with adolescent growth, but pancreas volume declined over the first year after T1D diagnosis ( < 0.001). In multiple autoantibody-positive individuals, the pancreas volume was significantly larger than that of the T1D cohort ( = 0.017) but smaller than that of the control cohort ( = 0.04). Diffusion-weighted MRI showed that individuals with recent-onset T1D had a higher apparent diffusion coefficient ( = 0.012), suggesting a loss of cellular structural integrity, with heterogeneous pancreatic distribution.
CONCLUSIONS - These results indicate that pancreas volume is decreased in stages 1, 2, and 3 of T1D and decreases during the first year after diabetes onset and that this loss of pancreatic volume is accompanied by microstructural changes.
© 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.
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19 MeSH Terms
Antimicrobial exposure and the risk of delirium in critically ill patients.
Grahl JJ, Stollings JL, Rakhit S, Person AK, Wang L, Thompson JL, Pandharipande PP, Ely EW, Patel MB
(2018) Crit Care 22: 337
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Anti-Infective Agents, Cohort Studies, Critical Illness, Cross-Sectional Studies, Delirium, Female, Humans, Intensive Care Units, Length of Stay, Male, Middle Aged, Multivariate Analysis, Retrospective Studies
Show Abstract · Added December 16, 2018
BACKGROUND - Prior retrospective cross-sectional work has associated antimicrobials with a non-specific phrase: encephalopathy without seizures. The purpose of this study is to determine whether different classes of antimicrobials have differential associations with the daily risk of delirium after critical illness is adjusted for.
METHODS - Our study was a nested cohort that enrolled non-neurological critically ill adults from a medical or surgical intensive care unit (ICU) with daily follow-up to 30 days. Our independent variable was exposure to previous-day antimicrobial class: beta-lactams (subclasses: penicillins, first- to third-generation cephalosporins, fourth-generation cephalosporins, and carbapenems), macrolides, fluoroquinolones, and other. We adjusted for baseline covariates (age, comorbidities, cognition scores, sepsis, and mechanical ventilation), previous-day covariates (delirium, doses of analgesics/sedatives, and antipsychotic use), and same-day covariates (illness severity). Our primary outcome of delirium was measured by using the Confusion Assessment Method for the ICU. A daily delirium logistic regression model was used with an ICU time-restricted sensitivity analysis including daily adjustment for sepsis and mechanical ventilation.
RESULTS - Of 418 ICU patients, delirium occurred in 308 (74%) with a median of 3 days (interquartile range 2-6) among those affected and 318 (76%) were exposed to antimicrobials. When covariates and ICU type were adjusted for, only first- to third-generation cephalosporins were associated with delirium (logistic regression model odds ratio (OR) = 2.2, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.28-3.79, P = 0.004; sensitivity analysis OR = 2.13, 95% CI 1.10-4.10, P = 0.024).
CONCLUSIONS - First-, second-, and third-generation cephalosporins doubled the odds of delirium after baseline co-morbidities, ICU type, the course of critical care, and other competing antimicrobial and psychotropic medication risks were adjusted for. We did not find an association between delirium and cefepime, penicillins, carbapenems, fluoroquinolones, or macrolides.
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15 MeSH Terms
Genetic Variants Associated with Circulating Fibroblast Growth Factor 23.
Robinson-Cohen C, Bartz TM, Lai D, Ikizler TA, Peacock M, Imel EA, Michos ED, Foroud TM, Akesson K, Taylor KD, Malmgren L, Matsushita K, Nethander M, Eriksson J, Ohlsson C, Mellström D, Wolf M, Ljunggren O, McGuigan F, Rotter JI, Karlsson M, Econs MJ, Ix JH, Lutsey PL, Psaty BM, de Boer IH, Kestenbaum BR
(2018) J Am Soc Nephrol 29: 2583-2592
MeSH Terms: African Continental Ancestry Group, Cohort Studies, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Fibroblast Growth Factors, Genome-Wide Association Study, Humans, Kidney, Male, Phosphates, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, RGS Proteins, Sodium-Phosphate Cotransporter Proteins, Type IIa, Vitamin D, Vitamin D3 24-Hydroxylase
Show Abstract · Added January 3, 2019
BACKGROUND - Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), a bone-derived hormone that regulates phosphorus and vitamin D metabolism, contributes to the pathogenesis of mineral and bone disorders in CKD and is an emerging cardiovascular risk factor. Central elements of FGF23 regulation remain incompletely understood; genetic variation may help explain interindividual differences.
METHODS - We performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of circulating FGF23 concentrations among 16,624 participants of European ancestry from seven cohort studies, excluding participants with eGFR<30 ml/min per 1.73 m to focus on FGF23 under normal conditions. We evaluated the association of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with natural log-transformed FGF23 concentration, adjusted for age, sex, study site, and principal components of ancestry. A second model additionally adjusted for BMI and eGFR.
RESULTS - We discovered 154 SNPs from five independent regions associated with FGF23 concentration. The SNP with the strongest association, rs17216707 (=3.0×10), lies upstream of , which encodes the primary catabolic enzyme for 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D and 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Each additional copy of the T allele at this locus is associated with 5% higher FGF23 concentration. Another locus strongly associated with variations in FGF23 concentration is rs11741640, within and upstream of (a gene involved in renal phosphate transport). Additional adjustment for BMI and eGFR did not materially alter the magnitude of these associations. Another top locus (within , the ABO blood group transferase gene) was no longer statistically significant at the genome-wide level.
CONCLUSIONS - Common genetic variants located near genes involved in vitamin D metabolism and renal phosphate transport are associated with differences in circulating FGF23 concentrations.
Copyright © 2018 by the American Society of Nephrology.
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15 MeSH Terms
Association of abdominal muscle composition with prediabetes and diabetes: The CARDIA study.
Granados A, Gebremariam A, Gidding SS, Terry JG, Carr JJ, Steffen LM, Jacobs DR, Lee JM
(2019) Diabetes Obes Metab 21: 267-275
MeSH Terms: Abdominal Muscles, Adipose Tissue, Adiposity, Adolescent, Adult, Body Composition, Cohort Studies, Diabetes Mellitus, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Intra-Abdominal Fat, Male, Middle Aged, Physical Fitness, Prediabetic State, Prognosis, Risk Factors, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added September 11, 2018
AIM - To evaluate the relationship of abdominal muscle lean tissue and adipose tissue volumes with prediabetes and diabetes.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - We measured abdominal muscle composition in 3170 participants in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study who underwent computed tomography (CT) at Year 25 of follow-up (ages, 43-55 years). Multinomial regression analysis was used to evaluate the associations of CT-measured intermuscular adipose tissue (IMAT), lean muscle tissue (lean) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) volumes with diabetes at any point during the CARDIA study, newly detected prediabetes, prior history of prediabetes, and normal glucose tolerance. Models were adjusted for potential confounding factors: age, sex, race, height, smoking status, hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, cardiorespiratory fitness and study centre.
RESULTS - Higher IMAT, lean and VAT volumes were all separately associated with a higher prevalence of prediabetes and diabetes. Inclusion of VAT volume in models with both IMAT volume and lean volume attenuated the association of IMAT with both prediabetes and diabetes, but higher lean volume retained its association with prediabetes and diabetes. Individuals in the highest IMAT quartile, coupled with VAT in its lower three quartiles, had a higher prevalence of diabetes, but not of prediabetes, than those with both IMAT and VAT in their respective lower three quartiles. Adjusting for cardiorespiratory fitness did not substantially change the findings.
CONCLUSION - Higher IMAT volume was associated with a higher prevalence of diabetes even after adjustment for VAT volume. However, further study is warranted to understand the complicated relationship between abdominal muscle and adipose tissues.
© 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
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19 MeSH Terms
Relationship between very low low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations not due to statin therapy and risk of type 2 diabetes: A US-based cross-sectional observational study using electronic health records.
Feng Q, Wei WQ, Chung CP, Levinson RT, Sundermann AC, Mosley JD, Bastarache L, Ferguson JF, Cox NJ, Roden DM, Denny JC, Linton MF, Edwards DRV, Stein CM
(2018) PLoS Med 15: e1002642
MeSH Terms: Adult, Case-Control Studies, Cholesterol, LDL, Cohort Studies, Cross-Sectional Studies, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Electronic Health Records, Female, Humans, Logistic Models, Male, Middle Aged, Odds Ratio, Risk Factors, United States, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
BACKGROUND - Observations from statin clinical trials and from Mendelian randomization studies suggest that low low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) concentrations may be associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Despite the findings from statin clinical trials and genetic studies, there is little direct evidence implicating low LDL-C concentrations in increased risk of T2DM.
METHODS AND FINDINGS - We used de-identified electronic health records (EHRs) at Vanderbilt University Medical Center to compare the risk of T2DM in a cross-sectional study among individuals with very low (≤60 mg/dl, N = 8,943) and normal (90-130 mg/dl, N = 71,343) LDL-C levels calculated using the Friedewald formula. LDL-C levels associated with statin use, hospitalization, or a serum albumin level < 3 g/dl were excluded. We used a 2-phase approach: in 1/3 of the sample (discovery) we used T2DM phenome-wide association study codes (phecodes) to identify cases and controls, and in the remaining 2/3 (validation) we identified T2DM cases and controls using a validated algorithm. The analysis plan for the validation phase was constructed at the time of the design of that component of the study. The prevalence of T2DM in the very low and normal LDL-C groups was compared using logistic regression with adjustment for age, race, sex, body mass index (BMI), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and duration of care. Secondary analyses included prespecified stratification by sex, race, BMI, and LDL-C level. In the discovery cohort, phecodes related to T2DM were significantly more frequent in the very low LDL-C group. In the validation cohort (N = 33,039 after applying the T2DM algorithm to identify cases and controls), the risk of T2DM was increased in the very low compared to normal LDL-C group (odds ratio [OR] 2.06, 95% CI 1.80-2.37; P < 2 × 10-16). The findings remained significant in sensitivity analyses. The association between low LDL-C levels and T2DM was significant in males (OR 2.43, 95% CI 2.00-2.95; P < 2 × 10-16) and females (OR 1.74, 95% CI 1.42-2.12; P = 6.88 × 10-8); in normal weight (OR 2.18, 95% CI 1.59-2.98; P = 1.1× 10-6), overweight (OR 2.17, 95% CI 1.65-2.83; P = 1.73× 10-8), and obese (OR 2.00, 95% CI 1.65-2.41; P = 8 × 10-13) categories; and in individuals with LDL-C < 40 mg/dl (OR 2.31, 95% CI 1.71-3.10; P = 3.01× 10-8) and LDL-C 40-60 mg/dl (OR 1.99, 95% CI 1.71-2.32; P < 2.0× 10-16). The association was significant in individuals of European ancestry (OR 2.67, 95% CI 2.25-3.17; P < 2 × 10-16) but not in those of African ancestry (OR 1.09, 95% CI 0.81-1.46; P = 0.56). A limitation was that we only compared groups with very low and normal LDL-C levels; also, since this was not an inception cohort, we cannot exclude the possibility of reverse causation.
CONCLUSIONS - Very low LDL-C concentrations occurring in the absence of statin treatment were significantly associated with T2DM risk in a large EHR population; this increased risk was present in both sexes and all BMI categories, and in individuals of European ancestry but not of African ancestry. Longitudinal cohort studies to assess the relationship between very low LDL-C levels not associated with lipid-lowering therapy and risk of developing T2DM will be important.
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16 MeSH Terms
Neurofilament relates to white matter microstructure in older adults.
Moore EE, Hohman TJ, Badami FS, Pechman KR, Osborn KE, Acosta LMY, Bell SP, Babicz MA, Gifford KA, Anderson AW, Goldstein LE, Blennow K, Zetterberg H, Jefferson AL
(2018) Neurobiol Aging 70: 233-241
MeSH Terms: Aged, Aging, Amyloid beta-Peptides, Biomarkers, Brain, Cognitive Dysfunction, Cohort Studies, Diffusion Tensor Imaging, Female, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Neurofilament Proteins, Peptide Fragments, White Matter
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) neurofilament light (NFL) is a protein biomarker of axonal injury. To study whether NFL is associated with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measurements of white matter (WM) microstructure, Vanderbilt Memory & Aging Project participants with normal cognition (n = 77), early mild cognitive impairment (n = 15), and MCI (n = 55) underwent lumbar puncture to obtain CSF and 3T brain MRI. Voxel-wise analyses cross-sectionally related NFL to DTI metrics, adjusting for demographic and vascular risk factors. Increased NFL correlated with multiple DTI metrics (p-values < 0.05). An NFL × diagnosis interaction (excluding early mild cognitive impairment) on WM microstructure (p-values < 0.05) was detected, with associations strongest among MCI. Multiple NFL × CSF biomarker interactions were detected. Associations between NFL and worse WM metrics were strongest among amyloid-β-negative, tau-positive, and suspected nonamyloid pathology participants. Findings suggest increased NFL, a biomarker of axonal injury, is correlated with compromised WM microstructure. Results highlight the role of elevated NFL in predicting WM damage in cognitively impaired older adults who are amyloid-negative, tau-positive, or meet suspected nonamyloid pathology criteria.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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15 MeSH Terms
Clustering of end-organ disease and earlier mortality in adults with sickle cell disease: A retrospective-prospective cohort study.
Chaturvedi S, Ghafuri DL, Jordan N, Kassim A, Rodeghier M, DeBaun MR
(2018) Am J Hematol 93: 1153-1160
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Anemia, Sickle Cell, Cluster Analysis, Cohort Studies, Female, Humans, Male, Morbidity, Mortality, Multiple Organ Failure, Prognosis, Prospective Studies, Retrospective Studies, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added November 9, 2018
Chronic end-organ complications result in morbidity and mortality in adults with sickle cell disease (SCD). In a retrospective-prospective cohort of 150 adults with SCD who received standard care screening for pulmonary function abnormalities, cardiac disease, and renal assessment from January 2003 to 2016, we tested the hypothesis that clustering of end-organ disease is common and multiple organ impairment predicts mortality. Any end-organ disease occurred in 59.3% of individuals, and 24.0% developed multiple organ (>1) end-organ disease. The number of end-organs affected was associated with mortality (P ≤ .001); 8.2% (5 of 61) of individuals with no affected end-organ, 9.4% (5 of 53) of those with 1 affected organ, 20.7% (6 of 29) of those with 2 affected end-organs, and 85.7% (6 of 7) with 3 affected end-organs died over a median follow up period of 8.7 (interquartile range 3.5-11.4) years. Of the 22 individuals who died, 77.3% had evidence of any SCD-related end-organ impairment, and this was the primary or secondary cause of death in 45.0%. SCD-related chronic impairment in multiple organs, and its association with mortality, highlights the need to understand the common mechanisms underlying chronic end-organ damage in SCD, and the urgent need to develop interventions to prevent irreversible end-organ complications in SCD.
© 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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15 MeSH Terms
Serum metabolites are associated with all-cause mortality in chronic kidney disease.
Hu JR, Coresh J, Inker LA, Levey AS, Zheng Z, Rebholz CM, Tin A, Appel LJ, Chen J, Sarnak MJ, Grams ME
(2018) Kidney Int 94: 381-389
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Allantoin, Biomarkers, Cause of Death, Cohort Studies, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Fumarates, Humans, Kidney, Male, Metabolomics, Middle Aged, Renal Insufficiency, Chronic
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2019
Chronic kidney disease (CKD) involves significant metabolic abnormalities and has a high mortality rate. Because the levels of serum metabolites in patients with CKD might provide insight into subclinical disease states and risk for future mortality, we determined which serum metabolites reproducibly associate with mortality in CKD using a discovery and replication design. Metabolite levels were quantified via untargeted liquid chromatography and mass spectroscopy from serum samples of 299 patients with CKD in the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) study as a discovery cohort. Six among 622 metabolites were significantly associated with mortality over a median follow-up of 17 years after adjustment for demographic and clinical covariates, including urine protein and measured glomerular filtration rate. We then replicated associations with mortality in 963 patients with CKD from the African American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension (AASK) cohort over a median follow-up of ten years. Three of the six metabolites identified in the MDRD cohort replicated in the AASK cohort: fumarate, allantoin, and ribonate, belonging to energy, nucleotide, and carbohydrate pathways, respectively. Point estimates were similar in both studies and in meta-analysis (adjusted hazard ratios 1.63, 1.59, and 1.61, respectively, per doubling of the metabolite). Thus, selected serum metabolites were reproducibly associated with long-term mortality in CKD beyond markers of kidney function in two well characterized cohorts, providing targets for investigation.
Copyright © 2018 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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15 MeSH Terms
GDF-15, Galectin 3, Soluble ST2, and Risk of Mortality and Cardiovascular Events in CKD.
Tuegel C, Katz R, Alam M, Bhat Z, Bellovich K, de Boer I, Brosius F, Gadegbeku C, Gipson D, Hawkins J, Himmelfarb J, Ju W, Kestenbaum B, Kretzler M, Robinson-Cohen C, Steigerwalt S, Bansal N
(2018) Am J Kidney Dis 72: 519-528
MeSH Terms: Adult, Age Factors, Aged, Biomarkers, Cardiovascular Diseases, Cause of Death, Cohort Studies, Comorbidity, Female, Galectin 3, Growth Differentiation Factor 15, Humans, Interleukin-1 Receptor-Like 1 Protein, Kaplan-Meier Estimate, Male, Middle Aged, Prognosis, Proportional Hazards Models, Renal Insufficiency, Chronic, Retrospective Studies, Risk Assessment, Severity of Illness Index, Sex Factors, Survival Analysis
Show Abstract · Added January 3, 2019
RATIONALE & OBJECTIVE - Inflammation, cardiac remodeling, and fibrosis may explain in part the excess risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF-15), galectin 3 (Gal-3), and soluble ST2 (sST2) are possible biomarkers of these pathways in patients with CKD.
STUDY DESIGN - Observational cohort study.
SETTING & PARTICIPANTS - Individuals with CKD enrolled in either of 2 multicenter CKD cohort studies: the Seattle Kidney Study or C-PROBE (Clinical Phenotyping and Resource Biobank Study).
EXPOSURES - Circulating GDF-15, Gal-3, and sST2 measured at baseline.
OUTCOMES - Primary outcome was all-cause mortality. Secondary outcomes included hospitalization for physician-adjudicated heart failure and the atherosclerotic CVD events of myocardial infarction and cerebrovascular accident.
ANALYTIC APPROACH - Cox proportional hazards models used to test the association of each biomarker with each outcome, adjusting for demographics, CVD risk factors, and kidney function.
RESULTS - Among 883 participants, mean estimated glomerular filtration rate was 49±19mL/min/1.73m. Higher GDF-15 (adjusted HR [aHR] per 1-SD higher, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.53-2.29), Gal-3 (aHR per 1-SD higher, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.36-1.78), and sST2 (aHR per 1-SD higher, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.17-1.58) concentrations were significantly associated with mortality. Only GDF-15 level was also associated with heart failure events (HR per 1-SD higher, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.12-2.16). There were no detectable associations between GDF-15, Gal-3, or sST2 concentrations and atherosclerotic CVD events.
LIMITATIONS - Event rates for heart failure and atherosclerotic CVD were low.
CONCLUSIONS - Adults with CKD and higher circulating GDF-15, Gal-3, and sST2 concentrations experienced greater mortality. Elevated GDF-15 concentration was also associated with an increased rate of heart failure. Further work is needed to elucidate the mechanisms linking these circulating biomarkers with CVD in patients with CKD.
Copyright © 2018 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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24 MeSH Terms
Exploring the role of low-frequency and rare exonic variants in alcohol and tobacco use.
Marees AT, Hammerschlag AR, Bastarache L, de Kluiver H, Vorspan F, van den Brink W, Smit DJ, Denys D, Gamazon ER, Li-Gao R, Breetvelt EJ, de Groot MCH, Galesloot TE, Vermeulen SH, Poppelaars JL, Souverein PC, Keeman R, de Mutsert R, Noordam R, Rosendaal FR, Stringa N, Mook-Kanamori DO, Vaartjes I, Kiemeney LA, den Heijer M, van Schoor NM, Klungel OH, Maitland-Van der Zee AH, Schmidt MK, Polderman TJC, van der Leij AR, Posthuma D, Derks EM
(2018) Drug Alcohol Depend 188: 94-101
MeSH Terms: Alcohol Drinking, Alcoholism, Cohort Studies, Exons, Female, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genetic Variation, Humans, Male, Nerve Tissue Proteins, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Receptors, Nicotinic, Risk Factors, Tobacco Use, Tobacco Use Disorder
Show Abstract · Added May 26, 2018
BACKGROUND - Alcohol and tobacco use are heritable phenotypes. However, only a small number of common genetic variants have been identified, and common variants account for a modest proportion of the heritability. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the role of low-frequency and rare variants in alcohol and tobacco use.
METHODS - We meta-analyzed ExomeChip association results from eight discovery cohorts and included 12,466 subjects and 7432 smokers in the analysis of alcohol consumption and tobacco use, respectively. The ExomeChip interrogates low-frequency and rare exonic variants, and in addition a small pool of common variants. We investigated top variants in an independent sample in which ICD-9 diagnoses of "alcoholism" (N = 25,508) and "tobacco use disorder" (N = 27,068) had been assessed. In addition to the single variant analysis, we performed gene-based, polygenic risk score (PRS), and pathway analyses.
RESULTS - The meta-analysis did not yield exome-wide significant results. When we jointly analyzed our top results with the independent sample, no low-frequency or rare variants reached significance for alcohol consumption or tobacco use. However, two common variants that were present on the ExomeChip, rs16969968 (p = 2.39 × 10) and rs8034191 (p = 6.31 × 10) located in CHRNA5 and AGPHD1 at 15q25.1, showed evidence for association with tobacco use.
DISCUSSION - Low-frequency and rare exonic variants with large effects do not play a major role in alcohol and tobacco use, nor does the aggregate effect of ExomeChip variants. However, our results confirmed the role of the CHRNA5-CHRNA3-CHRNB4 cluster of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit genes in tobacco use.
Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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15 MeSH Terms