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Childhood temperament is associated with distress, anxiety and reduced quality of life in schizophrenia spectrum disorders.
Feola B, Armstrong K, Woodward ND, Heckers S, Blackford JU
(2019) Psychiatry Res 275: 196-203
MeSH Terms: Adult, Anxiety, Child, Cognition, Comorbidity, Female, Humans, Male, Personality, Personality Disorders, Quality of Life, Schizophrenia, Schizophrenic Psychology, Social Behavior, Stress, Psychological, Substance-Related Disorders, Temperament
Show Abstract · Added January 31, 2020
Schizophrenia is conceptualized as a neurodevelopmental disorder and pre-morbid differences in social function and cognition have been well-established. Less is known about pre-morbid temperament and personality. Inhibited temperament-the predisposition to respond to novelty with wariness, fear, or caution-is a premorbid risk factor for anxiety, depression, and substance use but is understudied in schizophrenia. Participants were patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders (n = 166) and healthy controls (n = 180). Patients completed measures of childhood inhibited temperament, clinical symptoms (anxiety, depression, PANSS factors), and quality of life. Patients had significantly higher levels of inhibited temperament relative to healthy controls. In patients with schizophrenia, higher inhibited temperament was significantly associated with co-morbid anxiety disorders, greater anxiety and depression symptoms, higher PANSS Distress scores, lower PANSS Excitement scores, and lower quality of life. The current findings replicate and extend previous research with a larger sample and are consistent with vulnerability in an affective path to psychosis. In schizophrenia, higher inhibited temperament was associated with a cluster of mood and anxiety symptoms. Inhibited temperament was not associated with psychosis symptoms. Patients with high inhibited temperament may especially benefit from treatments that specifically target anxiety and depression.
Copyright © 2019. Published by Elsevier B.V.
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MeSH Terms
Characterization of the hemodynamic response function in white matter tracts for event-related fMRI.
Li M, Newton AT, Anderson AW, Ding Z, Gore JC
(2019) Nat Commun 10: 1140
MeSH Terms: Adult, Cerebral Cortex, Cerebrovascular Circulation, Female, Gray Matter, Healthy Volunteers, Hemodynamics, Hemoglobins, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Nerve Net, Oxygen, Pattern Recognition, Visual, Stroop Test, White Matter
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Accurate estimates of the BOLD hemodynamic response function (HRF) are crucial for the interpretation and analysis of event-related functional MRI data. To date, however, there have been no comprehensive measurements of the HRF in white matter (WM) despite increasing evidence that BOLD signals in WM change after a stimulus. We performed an event-related cognitive task (Stroop color-word interference) to measure the HRF in selected human WM pathways. The task was chosen in order to produce robust, distributed centers of activity throughout the cortex. To measure the HRF in WM, fiber tracts were reconstructed between each pair of activated cortical areas. We observed clear task-specific HRFs with reduced magnitudes, delayed onsets and prolonged initial dips in WM tracts compared with activated grey matter, thus calling for significant changes to current standard models for accurately characterizing the HRFs in WM and for modifications of standard methods of analysis of functional imaging data.
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16 MeSH Terms
Perivascular spaces contribute to cognition beyond other small vessel disease markers.
Passiak BS, Liu D, Kresge HA, Cambronero FE, Pechman KR, Osborn KE, Gifford KA, Hohman TJ, Schrag MS, Davis LT, Jefferson AL
(2019) Neurology 92: e1309-e1321
MeSH Terms: Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Brain, Cerebrovascular Disorders, Cognition, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Humans, Longitudinal Studies, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Neuropsychological Tests
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
OBJECTIVE - To cross-sectionally relate multiple small vessel disease (SVD) neuroimaging markers to cognition among older adults.
METHODS - Vanderbilt Memory & Aging Project participants free of clinical dementia and stroke (n = 327, age 73 ± 7 years, 59% male, 40% with mild cognitive impairment) completed neuropsychological assessment and 3T MRI to measure white matter hyperintensities (WMH), perivascular spaces (PVS), cerebral microbleeds (CMBs), and lacunes. Linear regressions related each SVD marker to neuropsychological performances and adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, cognitive diagnosis, ε4 presence, Framingham Stroke Risk Profile, and intracranial volume.
RESULTS - WMH related to the most neuropsychological measures, including the Boston Naming Test, Animal Naming, Coding, Number Sequencing, Executive Function Composite, and Hooper Visual Organization Test performances ( ≤ 0.01). PVS related to multiple information processing and executive function performances ( ≤ 0.02). Lacunes and CMBs related to fewer measures than expected. Combined models simultaneously testing multiple statistically significant SVD predictors suggested that WMH, PVS, and CMBs each independently related to information processing and executive function performances; however, compared to other SVD markers, PVS remained statistically significant in models related to information processing and executive functioning performances.
CONCLUSIONS - As expected, increased WMH corresponded to poorer performances across multiple cognitive domains. PVS, previously considered a benign neuroimaging feature in older adults, may have important clinical implications because PVS was related to information processing and executive function performances even in combined models. On the basis of models with multiple SVD predictors, WMH, PVS, and CMBs may each reflect a separate pathway of small vessel injury.
© 2019 American Academy of Neurology.
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13 MeSH Terms
Challenges With Postoperative Cognitive Impairment Research.
Chandrasekhar R, Ely EW, Patel MB
(2019) JAMA Surg 154: 334-335
MeSH Terms: Cognition, Cognitive Dysfunction, Delirium, Humans
Added January 23, 2019
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4 MeSH Terms
Intrinsic Functional Network Connectivity Is Associated With Clinical Symptoms and Cognition in Late-Life Depression.
Gandelman JA, Albert K, Boyd BD, Park JW, Riddle M, Woodward ND, Kang H, Landman BA, Taylor WD
(2019) Biol Psychiatry Cogn Neurosci Neuroimaging 4: 160-170
MeSH Terms: Aged, Brain, Brain Mapping, Cognition, Depressive Disorder, Major, Female, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Neural Pathways, Neuropsychological Tests, Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
BACKGROUND - Late-life depression (LLD) has been associated with alterations in intrinsic functional networks, best characterized in the default mode network (DMN), cognitive control network (CCN), and salience network. However, these findings often derive from small samples, and it is not well understood how network findings relate to clinical and cognitive symptomatology.
METHODS - We studied 100 older adults (n = 79 with LLD, n = 21 nondepressed) and collected resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, clinical measures of depression, and performance on cognitive tests. We selected canonical network regions for each intrinsic functional network (DMN, CCN, and salience network) as seeds in seed-to-voxel analysis. We compared connectivity between the depressed and nondepressed groups and correlated connectivity with depression severity among depressed subjects. We then investigated whether the observed connectivity findings were associated with greater severity of common neuropsychiatric symptoms or poorer cognitive performance.
RESULTS - LLD was characterized by decreased DMN connectivity to the frontal pole, a CCN region (Wald χ = 22.33, p < .001). No significant group differences in connectivity were found for the CCN or salience network. However, in the LLD group, increased CCN connectivity was associated with increased depression severity (Wald χ > 20.14, p < .001), greater anhedonia (Wald χ = 7.02, p = .008) and fatigue (Wald χ = 6.31, p = .012), and poorer performance on tests of episodic memory (Wald χ > 4.65, p < .031), executive function (Wald χ = 7.18, p = .007), and working memory (Wald χ > 4.29, p < .038).
CONCLUSIONS - LLD is characterized by differences in DMN connectivity, while CCN connectivity is associated with LLD symptomology, including poorer performance in several cognitive domains.
Published by Elsevier Inc.
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13 MeSH Terms
Ventral prefrontal cortex and emotion regulation in aging: A case for utilizing transcranial magnetic stimulation.
Kim JU, Weisenbach SL, Zald DH
(2019) Int J Geriatr Psychiatry 34: 215-222
MeSH Terms: Aging, Cognition, Emotional Adjustment, Emotions, Humans, Prefrontal Cortex, Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation
Show Abstract · Added April 15, 2019
OBJECTIVES - The ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (vlPFC) has been speculated to play an important role in complex processes that allow emotional factors to influence human cognition. Accumulating evidence from human neuroimaging studies, in conjunction with studies of patients with lesions and animal models, shed light on the role of the vlPFC in emotion regulation (ER). This review aims to discuss and integrate recent findings related to vlPFC's role in ER in the context of aging, drawing from diverse sources, and suggest future directions for research utilizing transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS).
METHODS/DESIGN - We summarize findings from the existing literature investigating the neural basis of frontal-lobe mediated ER and then highlight major findings from recent studies directly comparing healthy younger and older adult groups. We conclude by pointing to unaddressed questions worth pursuing in future research.
RESULTS AND DISCUSSION - We propose future research directions utilizing TMS to answer key unaddressed questions. Moreover, we discuss the potential advantages, challenges, and limitations of using TMS as a complement to the existing neuroimaging methods in ER.
© 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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7 MeSH Terms
Axonal organization defects in the hippocampus of adult conditional BACE1 knockout mice.
Ou-Yang MH, Kurz JE, Nomura T, Popovic J, Rajapaksha TW, Dong H, Contractor A, Chetkovich DM, Tourtellotte WG, Vassar R
(2018) Sci Transl Med 10:
MeSH Terms: Aging, Amyloid Precursor Protein Secretases, Animals, Animals, Newborn, Apoptosis, Aspartic Acid Endopeptidases, Axons, Cognition, Epilepsy, Gene Deletion, Hippocampus, Long-Term Potentiation, Memory Disorders, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Myelin Sheath, Neurogenesis, Phenotype, Substrate Specificity
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
β-Site APP (amyloid precursor protein) cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) is the β-secretase enzyme that initiates production of the toxic amyloid-β peptide that accumulates in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Hence, BACE1 is a prime therapeutic target, and several BACE1 inhibitor drugs are currently being tested in clinical trials for AD. However, the safety of BACE1 inhibition is unclear. Germline BACE1 knockout mice have multiple neurological phenotypes, although these could arise from BACE1 deficiency during development. To address this question, we report that tamoxifen-inducible conditional BACE1 knockout mice in which the gene was ablated in the adult largely lacked the phenotypes observed in germline BACE1 knockout mice. However, one BACE1-null phenotype was induced after gene deletion in the adult mouse brain. This phenotype showed reduced length and disorganization of the hippocampal mossy fiber infrapyramidal bundle, the axonal pathway of dentate gyrus granule cells that is maintained by neurogenesis in the mouse brain. This defect in axonal organization correlated with reduced BACE1-mediated cleavage of the neural cell adhesion protein close homolog of L1 (CHL1), which has previously been associated with axon guidance. Although our results indicate that BACE1 inhibition in the adult mouse brain may avoid phenotypes associated with BACE1 deficiency during embryonic and postnatal development, they also suggest that BACE1 inhibitor drugs developed for treating AD may disrupt the organization of an axonal pathway in the hippocampus, an important structure for learning and memory.
Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.
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19 MeSH Terms
Disrupted structure and aberrant function of CHIP mediates the loss of motor and cognitive function in preclinical models of SCAR16.
Shi CH, Rubel C, Soss SE, Sanchez-Hodge R, Zhang S, Madrigal SC, Ravi S, McDonough H, Page RC, Chazin WJ, Patterson C, Mao CY, Willis MS, Luo HY, Li YS, Stevens DA, Tang MB, Du P, Wang YH, Hu ZW, Xu YM, Schisler JC
(2018) PLoS Genet 14: e1007664
MeSH Terms: Animals, Behavior, Animal, CRISPR-Cas Systems, Cognition, Disease Models, Animal, Female, Humans, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Models, Molecular, Motor Activity, Mutagenesis, Site-Directed, Phenotype, Point Mutation, Protein Domains, Protein Multimerization, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Spinocerebellar Ataxias, Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
CHIP (carboxyl terminus of heat shock 70-interacting protein) has long been recognized as an active member of the cellular protein quality control system given the ability of CHIP to function as both a co-chaperone and ubiquitin ligase. We discovered a genetic disease, now known as spinocerebellar autosomal recessive 16 (SCAR16), resulting from a coding mutation that caused a loss of CHIP ubiquitin ligase function. The initial mutation describing SCAR16 was a missense mutation in the ubiquitin ligase domain of CHIP (p.T246M). Using multiple biophysical and cellular approaches, we demonstrated that T246M mutation results in structural disorganization and misfolding of the CHIP U-box domain, promoting oligomerization, and increased proteasome-dependent turnover. CHIP-T246M has no ligase activity, but maintains interactions with chaperones and chaperone-related functions. To establish preclinical models of SCAR16, we engineered T246M at the endogenous locus in both mice and rats. Animals homozygous for T246M had both cognitive and motor cerebellar dysfunction distinct from those observed in the CHIP null animal model, as well as deficits in learning and memory, reflective of the cognitive deficits reported in SCAR16 patients. We conclude that the T246M mutation is not equivalent to the total loss of CHIP, supporting the concept that disease-causing CHIP mutations have different biophysical and functional repercussions on CHIP function that may directly correlate to the spectrum of clinical phenotypes observed in SCAR16 patients. Our findings both further expand our basic understanding of CHIP biology and provide meaningful mechanistic insight underlying the molecular drivers of SCAR16 disease pathology, which may be used to inform the development of novel therapeutics for this devastating disease.
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Deep brain stimulation for the treatment of disorders of consciousness and cognition in traumatic brain injury patients: a review.
Kundu B, Brock AA, Englot DJ, Butson CR, Rolston JD
(2018) Neurosurg Focus 45: E14
MeSH Terms: Animals, Brain Injuries, Traumatic, Cognition, Consciousness, Deep Brain Stimulation, Epilepsy, Humans, Thalamus
Show Abstract · Added September 25, 2018
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a looming epidemic, growing most rapidly in the elderly population. Some of the most devastating sequelae of TBI are related to depressed levels of consciousness (e.g., coma, minimally conscious state) or deficits in executive function. To date, pharmacological and rehabilitative therapies to treat these sequelae are limited. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been used to treat a number of pathologies, including Parkinson disease, essential tremor, and epilepsy. Animal and clinical research shows that targets addressing depressed levels of consciousness include components of the ascending reticular activating system and areas of the thalamus. Targets for improving executive function are more varied and include areas that modulate attention and memory, such as the frontal and prefrontal cortex, fornix, nucleus accumbens, internal capsule, thalamus, and some brainstem nuclei. The authors review the literature addressing the use of DBS to treat higher-order cognitive dysfunction and disorders of consciousness in TBI patients, while also offering suggestions on directions for future research.
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8 MeSH Terms
Higher Aortic Stiffness Is Related to Lower Cerebral Blood Flow and Preserved Cerebrovascular Reactivity in Older Adults.
Jefferson AL, Cambronero FE, Liu D, Moore EE, Neal JE, Terry JG, Nair S, Pechman KR, Rane S, Davis LT, Gifford KA, Hohman TJ, Bell SP, Wang TJ, Beckman JA, Carr JJ
(2018) Circulation 138: 1951-1962
MeSH Terms: Aged, Aorta, Thoracic, Apolipoprotein E4, Brain, Cerebrovascular Circulation, Cognition, Cognitive Dysfunction, Female, Hemodynamics, Humans, Linear Models, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Cine, Male, Middle Aged, Pulse Wave Analysis, Vascular Stiffness
Show Abstract · Added September 11, 2018
BACKGROUND - Mechanisms underlying the association between age-related arterial stiffening and poor brain health remain elusive. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) homeostasis may be implicated. This study evaluates how aortic stiffening relates to resting CBF and cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) in older adults.
METHODS - Vanderbilt Memory & Aging Project participants free of clinical dementia, stroke, and heart failure were studied, including older adults with normal cognition (n=155; age, 72±7 years; 59% male) or mild cognitive impairment (n=115; age, 73±7 years; 57% male). Aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV; meters per second) was quantified from cardiac magnetic resonance. Resting CBF (milliliters per 100 g per minute) and CVR (CBF response to hypercapnic normoxia stimulus) were quantified from pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging. Linear regression models related aortic PWV to regional CBF, adjusting for age, race/ethnicity, education, Framingham Stroke Risk Profile (diabetes mellitus, smoking, left ventricular hypertrophy, prevalent cardiovascular disease, atrial fibrillation), hypertension, body mass index, apolipoprotein E4 ( APOE ε4) status, and regional tissue volume. Models were repeated testing PWV× APOE ε4 interactions. Sensitivity analyses excluded participants with prevalent cardiovascular disease and atrial fibrillation.
RESULTS - Among participants with normal cognition, higher aortic PWV related to lower frontal lobe CBF (β=-0.43; P=0.04) and higher CVR in the whole brain (β=0.11; P=0.02), frontal lobes (β=0.12; P<0.05), temporal lobes (β=0.11; P=0.02), and occipital lobes (β=0.14; P=0.01). Among APOE ε4 carriers with normal cognition, findings were more pronounced with higher PWV relating to lower whole-brain CBF (β=-1.16; P=0.047), lower temporal lobe CBF (β=-1.81; P=0.004), and higher temporal lobe CVR (β=0.26; P=0.08), although the last result did not meet the a priori significance threshold. Results were similar in sensitivity models. Among participants with mild cognitive impairment, higher aortic PWV related to lower CBF in the occipital lobe (β=-0.70; P=0.02), but this finding was attenuated when participants with prevalent cardiovascular disease and atrial fibrillation were excluded. Among APOE ε4 carriers with mild cognitive impairment, findings were more pronounced with higher PWV relating to lower temporal lobe CBF (β=-1.20; P=0.02).
CONCLUSIONS - Greater aortic stiffening relates to lower regional CBF and higher CVR in cognitively normal older adults, especially among individuals with increased genetic predisposition for Alzheimer's disease. Central arterial stiffening may contribute to reductions in regional CBF despite preserved cerebrovascular reserve capacity.
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16 MeSH Terms