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Combined linkage and association analysis identifies rare and low frequency variants for blood pressure at 1q31.
Wang H, Nandakumar P, Tekola-Ayele F, Tayo BO, Ware EB, Gu CC, Lu Y, Yao J, Zhao W, Smith JA, Hellwege JN, Guo X, Edwards TL, Loos RJF, Arnett DK, Fornage M, Rotimi C, Kardia SLR, Cooper RS, Rao DC, Ehret G, Chakravarti A, Zhu X
(2019) Eur J Hum Genet 27: 269-277
MeSH Terms: African Americans, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 1, Gene Frequency, Genome-Wide Association Study, Humans, Hypertension, Linkage Disequilibrium, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
High blood pressure (BP) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and is more prevalent in African Americans as compared to other US groups. Although large, population-based genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified over 300 common polymorphisms modulating inter-individual BP variation, largely in European ancestry subjects, most of them do not localize to regions previously identified through family-based linkage studies. This discrepancy has remained unexplained despite the statistical power differences between current GWAS and prior linkage studies. To address this issue, we performed genome-wide linkage analysis of BP traits in African-American families from the Family Blood Pressure Program (FBPP) and genotyped on the Illumina Human Exome BeadChip v1.1. We identified a genomic region on chromosome 1q31 with LOD score 3.8 for pulse pressure (PP), a region we previously implicated in DBP studies of European ancestry families. Although no reported GWAS variants map to this region, combined linkage and association analysis of PP identified 81 rare and low frequency exonic variants accounting for the linkage evidence. Replication analysis in eight independent African ancestry cohorts (N = 16,968) supports this specific association with PP (P = 0.0509). Additional association and network analyses identified multiple potential candidate genes in this region expressed in multiple tissues and with a strong biological support for a role in BP. In conclusion, multiple genes and rare variants on 1q31 contribute to PP variation. Beyond producing new insights into PP, we demonstrate how family-based linkage and association studies can implicate specific rare and low frequency variants for complex traits.
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Type 2 Diabetes Variants Disrupt Function of SLC16A11 through Two Distinct Mechanisms.
Rusu V, Hoch E, Mercader JM, Tenen DE, Gymrek M, Hartigan CR, DeRan M, von Grotthuss M, Fontanillas P, Spooner A, Guzman G, Deik AA, Pierce KA, Dennis C, Clish CB, Carr SA, Wagner BK, Schenone M, Ng MCY, Chen BH, MEDIA Consortium, SIGMA T2D Consortium, Centeno-Cruz F, Zerrweck C, Orozco L, Altshuler DM, Schreiber SL, Florez JC, Jacobs SBR, Lander ES
(2017) Cell 170: 199-212.e20
MeSH Terms: Basigin, Cell Membrane, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 17, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Gene Knockdown Techniques, Haplotypes, Hepatocytes, Heterozygote, Histone Code, Humans, Liver, Models, Molecular, Monocarboxylic Acid Transporters
Show Abstract · Added September 20, 2017
Type 2 diabetes (T2D) affects Latinos at twice the rate seen in populations of European descent. We recently identified a risk haplotype spanning SLC16A11 that explains ∼20% of the increased T2D prevalence in Mexico. Here, through genetic fine-mapping, we define a set of tightly linked variants likely to contain the causal allele(s). We show that variants on the T2D-associated haplotype have two distinct effects: (1) decreasing SLC16A11 expression in liver and (2) disrupting a key interaction with basigin, thereby reducing cell-surface localization. Both independent mechanisms reduce SLC16A11 function and suggest SLC16A11 is the causal gene at this locus. To gain insight into how SLC16A11 disruption impacts T2D risk, we demonstrate that SLC16A11 is a proton-coupled monocarboxylate transporter and that genetic perturbation of SLC16A11 induces changes in fatty acid and lipid metabolism that are associated with increased T2D risk. Our findings suggest that increasing SLC16A11 function could be therapeutically beneficial for T2D. VIDEO ABSTRACT.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Mutant IDH1 and seizures in patients with glioma.
Chen H, Judkins J, Thomas C, Wu M, Khoury L, Benjamin CG, Pacione D, Golfinos JG, Kumthekar P, Ghamsari F, Chen L, Lein P, Chetkovich DM, Snuderl M, Horbinski C
(2017) Neurology 88: 1805-1813
MeSH Terms: Action Potentials, Animals, Brain Neoplasms, Cells, Cultured, Cerebral Cortex, Chromosome Deletion, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 1, Female, Glioma, Glutarates, Humans, Isocitrate Dehydrogenase, Male, Middle Aged, Mutation, Neoplasm Grading, Neurons, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Retrospective Studies, Seizures
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
OBJECTIVE - Because the d-2-hydroxyglutarate (D2HG) product of mutant isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) is released by tumor cells into the microenvironment and is structurally similar to the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate, we sought to determine whether IDH1 increases the risk of seizures in patients with glioma, and whether D2HG increases the electrical activity of neurons.
METHODS - Three WHO grade II-IV glioma cohorts from separate institutions (total N = 712) were retrospectively assessed for the presence of preoperative seizures and tumor location, WHO grade, 1p/19q codeletion, and IDH1 status. Rat cortical neurons were grown on microelectrode arrays, and their electrical activity was measured before and after treatment with exogenous D2HG, in the presence or absence of the selective NMDA antagonist, AP5.
RESULTS - Preoperative seizures were observed in 18%-34% of IDH1 wild-type (IDH1) patients and in 59%-74% of IDH1 patients ( < 0.001). Multivariable analysis, including WHO grade, 1p/19q codeletion, and temporal lobe location, showed that IDH1 was an independent correlate with seizures (odds ratio 2.5, 95% confidence interval 1.6-3.9, < 0.001). Exogenous D2HG increased the firing rate of cultured rat cortical neurons 4- to 6-fold, but was completely blocked by AP5.
CONCLUSIONS - The D2HG product of IDH1 may increase neuronal activity by mimicking the activity of glutamate on the NMDA receptor, and IDH1 gliomas are more likely to cause seizures in patients. This has rapid translational implications for the personalized management of tumor-associated epilepsy, as targeted IDH1 inhibitors may improve antiepileptic therapy in patients with IDH1 gliomas.
© 2017 American Academy of Neurology.
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Rare variants in fox-1 homolog A (RBFOX1) are associated with lower blood pressure.
He KY, Wang H, Cade BE, Nandakumar P, Giri A, Ware EB, Haessler J, Liang J, Smith JA, Franceschini N, Le TH, Kooperberg C, Edwards TL, Kardia SL, Lin X, Chakravarti A, Redline S, Zhu X
(2017) PLoS Genet 13: e1006678
MeSH Terms: Adult, Blood Pressure, Body Mass Index, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 16, European Continental Ancestry Group, Family Health, Female, Gene Expression, Gene Frequency, Genetic Linkage, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genome-Wide Association Study, Genotype, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Pedigree, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, RNA Splicing Factors
Show Abstract · Added April 26, 2017
Many large genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified common blood pressure (BP) variants. However, most of the identified BP variants do not overlap with the linkage evidence observed from family studies. We thus hypothesize that multiple rare variants contribute to the observed linkage evidence. We performed linkage analysis using 517 individuals in 130 European families from the Cleveland Family Study (CFS) who have been genotyped on the Illumina OmniExpress Exome array. The largest linkage peak was observed on chromosome 16p13 (MLOD = 2.81) for systolic blood pressure (SBP). Follow-up conditional linkage and association analyses in the linkage region identified multiple rare, coding variants in RBFOX1 associated with reduced SBP. In a 17-member CFS family, carriers of the missense variant rs149974858 are normotensive despite being obese (average BMI = 60 kg/m2). Gene-based association test of rare variants using SKAT-O showed significant association with SBP (p-value = 0.00403) and DBP (p-value = 0.0258) in the CFS participants and the association was replicated in large independent replication studies (N = 57,234, p-value = 0.013 for SBP, 0.0023 for PP). RBFOX1 is expressed in brain tissues, the atrial appendage and left ventricle in the heart, and in skeletal muscle tissues, organs/tissues which are potentially related to blood pressure. Our study showed that associations of rare variants could be efficiently detected using family information.
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19 MeSH Terms
Functional mechanisms underlying pleiotropic risk alleles at the 19p13.1 breast-ovarian cancer susceptibility locus.
Lawrenson K, Kar S, McCue K, Kuchenbaeker K, Michailidou K, Tyrer J, Beesley J, Ramus SJ, Li Q, Delgado MK, Lee JM, Aittomäki K, Andrulis IL, Anton-Culver H, Arndt V, Arun BK, Arver B, Bandera EV, Barile M, Barkardottir RB, Barrowdale D, Beckmann MW, Benitez J, Berchuck A, Bisogna M, Bjorge L, Blomqvist C, Blot W, Bogdanova N, Bojesen A, Bojesen SE, Bolla MK, Bonanni B, Børresen-Dale AL, Brauch H, Brennan P, Brenner H, Bruinsma F, Brunet J, Buhari SA, Burwinkel B, Butzow R, Buys SS, Cai Q, Caldes T, Campbell I, Canniotto R, Chang-Claude J, Chiquette J, Choi JY, Claes KB, GEMO Study Collaborators, Cook LS, Cox A, Cramer DW, Cross SS, Cybulski C, Czene K, Daly MB, Damiola F, Dansonka-Mieszkowska A, Darabi H, Dennis J, Devilee P, Diez O, Doherty JA, Domchek SM, Dorfling CM, Dörk T, Dumont M, Ehrencrona H, Ejlertsen B, Ellis S, EMBRACE, Engel C, Lee E, Evans DG, Fasching PA, Feliubadalo L, Figueroa J, Flesch-Janys D, Fletcher O, Flyger H, Foretova L, Fostira F, Foulkes WD, Fridley BL, Friedman E, Frost D, Gambino G, Ganz PA, Garber J, García-Closas M, Gentry-Maharaj A, Ghoussaini M, Giles GG, Glasspool R, Godwin AK, Goldberg MS, Goldgar DE, González-Neira A, Goode EL, Goodman MT, Greene MH, Gronwald J, Guénel P, Haiman CA, Hall P, Hallberg E, Hamann U, Hansen TV, Harrington PA, Hartman M, Hassan N, Healey S, Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Research Group Netherlands (HEBON), Heitz F, Herzog J, Høgdall E, Høgdall CK, Hogervorst FB, Hollestelle A, Hopper JL, Hulick PJ, Huzarski T, Imyanitov EN, KConFab Investigators, Australian Ovarian Cancer Study Group, Isaacs C, Ito H, Jakubowska A, Janavicius R, Jensen A, John EM, Johnson N, Kabisch M, Kang D, Kapuscinski M, Karlan BY, Khan S, Kiemeney LA, Kjaer SK, Knight JA, Konstantopoulou I, Kosma VM, Kristensen V, Kupryjanczyk J, Kwong A, de la Hoya M, Laitman Y, Lambrechts D, Le N, De Leeneer K, Lester J, Levine DA, Li J, Lindblom A, Long J, Lophatananon A, Loud JT, Lu K, Lubinski J, Mannermaa A, Manoukian S, Le Marchand L, Margolin S, Marme F, Massuger LF, Matsuo K, Mazoyer S, McGuffog L, McLean C, McNeish I, Meindl A, Menon U, Mensenkamp AR, Milne RL, Montagna M, Moysich KB, Muir K, Mulligan AM, Nathanson KL, Ness RB, Neuhausen SL, Nevanlinna H, Nord S, Nussbaum RL, Odunsi K, Offit K, Olah E, Olopade OI, Olson JE, Olswold C, O'Malley D, Orlow I, Orr N, Osorio A, Park SK, Pearce CL, Pejovic T, Peterlongo P, Pfeiler G, Phelan CM, Poole EM, Pylkäs K, Radice P, Rantala J, Rashid MU, Rennert G, Rhenius V, Rhiem K, Risch HA, Rodriguez G, Rossing MA, Rudolph A, Salvesen HB, Sangrajrang S, Sawyer EJ, Schildkraut JM, Schmidt MK, Schmutzler RK, Sellers TA, Seynaeve C, Shah M, Shen CY, Shu XO, Sieh W, Singer CF, Sinilnikova OM, Slager S, Song H, Soucy P, Southey MC, Stenmark-Askmalm M, Stoppa-Lyonnet D, Sutter C, Swerdlow A, Tchatchou S, Teixeira MR, Teo SH, Terry KL, Terry MB, Thomassen M, Tibiletti MG, Tihomirova L, Tognazzo S, Toland AE, Tomlinson I, Torres D, Truong T, Tseng CC, Tung N, Tworoger SS, Vachon C, van den Ouweland AM, van Doorn HC, van Rensburg EJ, Van't Veer LJ, Vanderstichele A, Vergote I, Vijai J, Wang Q, Wang-Gohrke S, Weitzel JN, Wentzensen N, Whittemore AS, Wildiers H, Winqvist R, Wu AH, Yannoukakos D, Yoon SY, Yu JC, Zheng W, Zheng Y, Khanna KK, Simard J, Monteiro AN, French JD, Couch FJ, Freedman ML, Easton DF, Dunning AM, Pharoah PD, Edwards SL, Chenevix-Trench G, Antoniou AC, Gayther SA
(2016) Nat Commun 7: 12675
MeSH Terms: African Continental Ancestry Group, Alleles, Asian Continental Ancestry Group, Breast Neoplasms, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 19, Female, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genome-Wide Association Study, Genotype, Humans, Ovarian Neoplasms, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, RNA, Messenger
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2018
A locus at 19p13 is associated with breast cancer (BC) and ovarian cancer (OC) risk. Here we analyse 438 SNPs in this region in 46,451 BC and 15,438 OC cases, 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers and 73,444 controls and identify 13 candidate causal SNPs associated with serous OC (P=9.2 × 10(-20)), ER-negative BC (P=1.1 × 10(-13)), BRCA1-associated BC (P=7.7 × 10(-16)) and triple negative BC (P-diff=2 × 10(-5)). Genotype-gene expression associations are identified for candidate target genes ANKLE1 (P=2 × 10(-3)) and ABHD8 (P<2 × 10(-3)). Chromosome conformation capture identifies interactions between four candidate SNPs and ABHD8, and luciferase assays indicate six risk alleles increased transactivation of the ADHD8 promoter. Targeted deletion of a region containing risk SNP rs56069439 in a putative enhancer induces ANKLE1 downregulation; and mRNA stability assays indicate functional effects for an ANKLE1 3'-UTR SNP. Altogether, these data suggest that multiple SNPs at 19p13 regulate ABHD8 and perhaps ANKLE1 expression, and indicate common mechanisms underlying breast and ovarian cancer risk.
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13 MeSH Terms
Fine-Mapping of the 1p11.2 Breast Cancer Susceptibility Locus.
Horne HN, Chung CC, Zhang H, Yu K, Prokunina-Olsson L, Michailidou K, Bolla MK, Wang Q, Dennis J, Hopper JL, Southey MC, Schmidt MK, Broeks A, Muir K, Lophatananon A, Fasching PA, Beckmann MW, Fletcher O, Johnson N, Sawyer EJ, Tomlinson I, Burwinkel B, Marme F, Guénel P, Truong T, Bojesen SE, Flyger H, Benitez J, González-Neira A, Anton-Culver H, Neuhausen SL, Brenner H, Arndt V, Meindl A, Schmutzler RK, Brauch H, Hamann U, Nevanlinna H, Khan S, Matsuo K, Iwata H, Dörk T, Bogdanova NV, Lindblom A, Margolin S, Mannermaa A, Kosma VM, Chenevix-Trench G, kConFab/AOCS Investigators, Wu AH, Ven den Berg D, Smeets A, Zhao H, Chang-Claude J, Rudolph A, Radice P, Barile M, Couch FJ, Vachon C, Giles GG, Milne RL, Haiman CA, Marchand LL, Goldberg MS, Teo SH, Taib NA, Kristensen V, Borresen-Dale AL, Zheng W, Shrubsole M, Winqvist R, Jukkola-Vuorinen A, Andrulis IL, Knight JA, Devilee P, Seynaeve C, García-Closas M, Czene K, Darabi H, Hollestelle A, Martens JW, Li J, Lu W, Shu XO, Cox A, Cross SS, Blot W, Cai Q, Shah M, Luccarini C, Baynes C, Harrington P, Kang D, Choi JY, Hartman M, Chia KS, Kabisch M, Torres D, Jakubowska A, Lubinski J, Sangrajrang S, Brennan P, Slager S, Yannoukakos D, Shen CY, Hou MF, Swerdlow A, Orr N, Simard J, Hall P, Pharoah PD, Easton DF, Chanock SJ, Dunning AM, Figueroa JD
(2016) PLoS One 11: e0160316
MeSH Terms: Alleles, Breast Neoplasms, Case-Control Studies, Chromosome Mapping, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 1, Computational Biology, Female, Gene Frequency, Genetic Association Studies, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genotype, Humans, Linkage Disequilibrium, Neoplasm Grading, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Population Surveillance, Quantitative Trait Loci, Risk Assessment
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2018
The Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility genome-wide association study (GWAS) originally identified a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs11249433 at 1p11.2 associated with breast cancer risk. To fine-map this locus, we genotyped 92 SNPs in a 900kb region (120,505,799-121,481,132) flanking rs11249433 in 45,276 breast cancer cases and 48,998 controls of European, Asian and African ancestry from 50 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. Genotyping was done using iCOGS, a custom-built array. Due to the complicated nature of the region on chr1p11.2: 120,300,000-120,505,798, that lies near the centromere and contains seven duplicated genomic segments, we restricted analyses to 429 SNPs excluding the duplicated regions (42 genotyped and 387 imputed). Per-allelic associations with breast cancer risk were estimated using logistic regression models adjusting for study and ancestry-specific principal components. The strongest association observed was with the original identified index SNP rs11249433 (minor allele frequency (MAF) 0.402; per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.08-1.13, P = 1.49 x 10-21). The association for rs11249433 was limited to ER-positive breast cancers (test for heterogeneity P≤8.41 x 10-5). Additional analyses by other tumor characteristics showed stronger associations with moderately/well differentiated tumors and tumors of lobular histology. Although no significant eQTL associations were observed, in silico analyses showed that rs11249433 was located in a region that is likely a weak enhancer/promoter. Fine-mapping analysis of the 1p11.2 breast cancer susceptibility locus confirms this region to be limited to risk to cancers that are ER-positive.
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Identification of independent association signals and putative functional variants for breast cancer risk through fine-scale mapping of the 12p11 locus.
Zeng C, Guo X, Long J, Kuchenbaecker KB, Droit A, Michailidou K, Ghoussaini M, Kar S, Freeman A, Hopper JL, Milne RL, Bolla MK, Wang Q, Dennis J, Agata S, Ahmed S, Aittomäki K, Andrulis IL, Anton-Culver H, Antonenkova NN, Arason A, Arndt V, Arun BK, Arver B, Bacot F, Barrowdale D, Baynes C, Beeghly-Fadiel A, Benitez J, Bermisheva M, Blomqvist C, Blot WJ, Bogdanova NV, Bojesen SE, Bonanni B, Borresen-Dale AL, Brand JS, Brauch H, Brennan P, Brenner H, Broeks A, Brüning T, Burwinkel B, Buys SS, Cai Q, Caldes T, Campbell I, Carpenter J, Chang-Claude J, Choi JY, Claes KB, Clarke C, Cox A, Cross SS, Czene K, Daly MB, de la Hoya M, De Leeneer K, Devilee P, Diez O, Domchek SM, Doody M, Dorfling CM, Dörk T, Dos-Santos-Silva I, Dumont M, Dwek M, Dworniczak B, Egan K, Eilber U, Einbeigi Z, Ejlertsen B, Ellis S, Frost D, Lalloo F, EMBRACE, Fasching PA, Figueroa J, Flyger H, Friedlander M, Friedman E, Gambino G, Gao YT, Garber J, García-Closas M, Gehrig A, Damiola F, Lesueur F, Mazoyer S, Stoppa-Lyonnet D, behalf of GEMO Study Collaborators, Giles GG, Godwin AK, Goldgar DE, González-Neira A, Greene MH, Guénel P, Haeberle L, Haiman CA, Hallberg E, Hamann U, Hansen TV, Hart S, Hartikainen JM, Hartman M, Hassan N, Healey S, Hogervorst FB, Verhoef S, HEBON, Hendricks CB, Hillemanns P, Hollestelle A, Hulick PJ, Hunter DJ, Imyanitov EN, Isaacs C, Ito H, Jakubowska A, Janavicius R, Jaworska-Bieniek K, Jensen UB, John EM, Joly Beauparlant C, Jones M, Kabisch M, Kang D, Karlan BY, Kauppila S, Kerin MJ, Khan S, Khusnutdinova E, Knight JA, Konstantopoulou I, Kraft P, Kwong A, Laitman Y, Lambrechts D, Lazaro C, Le Marchand L, Lee CN, Lee MH, Lester J, Li J, Liljegren A, Lindblom A, Lophatananon A, Lubinski J, Mai PL, Mannermaa A, Manoukian S, Margolin S, Marme F, Matsuo K, McGuffog L, Meindl A, Menegaux F, Montagna M, Muir K, Mulligan AM, Nathanson KL, Neuhausen SL, Nevanlinna H, Newcomb PA, Nord S, Nussbaum RL, Offit K, Olah E, Olopade OI, Olswold C, Osorio A, Papi L, Park-Simon TW, Paulsson-Karlsson Y, Peeters S, Peissel B, Peterlongo P, Peto J, Pfeiler G, Phelan CM, Presneau N, Radice P, Rahman N, Ramus SJ, Rashid MU, Rennert G, Rhiem K, Rudolph A, Salani R, Sangrajrang S, Sawyer EJ, Schmidt MK, Schmutzler RK, Schoemaker MJ, Schürmann P, Seynaeve C, Shen CY, Shrubsole MJ, Shu XO, Sigurdson A, Singer CF, Slager S, Soucy P, Southey M, Steinemann D, Swerdlow A, Szabo CI, Tchatchou S, Teixeira MR, Teo SH, Terry MB, Tessier DC, Teulé A, Thomassen M, Tihomirova L, Tischkowitz M, Toland AE, Tung N, Turnbull C, van den Ouweland AM, van Rensburg EJ, Ven den Berg D, Vijai J, Wang-Gohrke S, Weitzel JN, Whittemore AS, Winqvist R, Wong TY, Wu AH, Yannoukakos D, Yu JC, Pharoah PD, Hall P, Chenevix-Trench G, KConFab, AOCS Investigators, Dunning AM, Simard J, Couch FJ, Antoniou AC, Easton DF, Zheng W
(2016) Breast Cancer Res 18: 64
MeSH Terms: Alleles, BRCA1 Protein, Breast Neoplasms, Case-Control Studies, Chromosome Mapping, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 12, Computational Biology, Databases, Genetic, Enhancer Elements, Genetic, Epigenesis, Genetic, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genome-Wide Association Study, Genotype, Haplotypes, Heterozygote, Humans, Mutation, Odds Ratio, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Population Surveillance, Promoter Regions, Genetic, Quantitative Trait Loci, Risk
Show Abstract · Added April 18, 2017
BACKGROUND - Multiple recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs10771399, at 12p11 that is associated with breast cancer risk.
METHOD - We performed a fine-scale mapping study of a 700 kb region including 441 genotyped and more than 1300 imputed genetic variants in 48,155 cases and 43,612 controls of European descent, 6269 cases and 6624 controls of East Asian descent and 1116 cases and 932 controls of African descent in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC; http://bcac.ccge.medschl.cam.ac.uk/ ), and in 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). Stepwise regression analyses were performed to identify independent association signals. Data from the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements project (ENCODE) and the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) were used for functional annotation.
RESULTS - Analysis of data from European descendants found evidence for four independent association signals at 12p11, represented by rs7297051 (odds ratio (OR) = 1.09, 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 1.06-1.12; P = 3 × 10(-9)), rs805510 (OR = 1.08, 95 % CI = 1.04-1.12, P = 2 × 10(-5)), and rs1871152 (OR = 1.04, 95 % CI = 1.02-1.06; P = 2 × 10(-4)) identified in the general populations, and rs113824616 (P = 7 × 10(-5)) identified in the meta-analysis of BCAC ER-negative cases and BRCA1 mutation carriers. SNPs rs7297051, rs805510 and rs113824616 were also associated with breast cancer risk at P < 0.05 in East Asians, but none of the associations were statistically significant in African descendants. Multiple candidate functional variants are located in putative enhancer sequences. Chromatin interaction data suggested that PTHLH was the likely target gene of these enhancers. Of the six variants with the strongest evidence of potential functionality, rs11049453 was statistically significantly associated with the expression of PTHLH and its nearby gene CCDC91 at P < 0.05.
CONCLUSION - This study identified four independent association signals at 12p11 and revealed potentially functional variants, providing additional insights into the underlying biological mechanism(s) for the association observed between variants at 12p11 and breast cancer risk.
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Genome-wide association study confirms lung cancer susceptibility loci on chromosomes 5p15 and 15q25 in an African-American population.
Zanetti KA, Wang Z, Aldrich M, Amos CI, Blot WJ, Bowman ED, Burdette L, Cai Q, Caporaso N, Chung CC, Gillanders EM, Haiman CA, Hansen HM, Henderson BE, Kolonel LN, Marchand LL, Li S, McNeill LH, Ryan BM, Schwartz AG, Sison JD, Spitz MR, Tucker M, Wenzlaff AS, Wiencke JK, Wilkens L, Wrensch MR, Wu X, Zheng W, Zhou W, Christiani D, Palmer JR, Penning TM, Rieber AG, Rosenberg L, Ruiz-Narvaez EA, Su L, Vachani A, Wei Y, Whitehead AS, Chanock SJ, Harris CC
(2016) Lung Cancer 98: 33-42
MeSH Terms: African Americans, Case-Control Studies, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 15, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 5, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genome-Wide Association Study, Humans, Lung Neoplasms, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Population Surveillance, Quantitative Trait Loci
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2018
OBJECTIVES - Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of lung cancer have identified regions of common genetic variation with lung cancer risk in Europeans who smoke and never-smoking Asian women. This study aimed to conduct a GWAS in African Americans, who have higher rates of lung cancer despite smoking fewer cigarettes per day when compared with Caucasians. This population provides a different genetic architecture based on underlying African ancestry allowing the identification of new regions and exploration of known regions for finer mapping.
MATERIALS AND METHODS - We genotyped 1,024,001 SNPs in 1737 cases and 3602 controls in stage 1, followed by a replication phase of 20 SNPs (p<1.51×10(-5)) in an independent set of 866 cases and 796 controls in stage 2.
RESULTS AND CONCLUSION - In the combined analysis, we confirmed two loci to be associated with lung cancer that achieved the threshold of genome-wide significance: 15q25.1 marked by rs2036527 (p=1.3×10(-9); OR=1.32; 95% CI=1.20-1.44) near CHRNA5, and 5p15.33 marked by rs2853677 (p=2.8×10(-9); OR=1.28; 95% CI=1.18-1.39) near TERT. The association with rs2853677 is driven by the adenocarcinoma subtype of lung cancer (p=1.3×10(-8); OR=1.37; 95% CI=1.23-1.54). No SNPs reached genome-wide significance for either of the main effect models examining smoking - cigarettes per day and current or former smoker. Our study was powered to identify strong risk loci for lung cancer in African Americans; we confirmed results previously reported in African Americans and other populations for two loci near plausible candidate genes, CHRNA5 and TERT, on 15q25.1 and 5p15.33 respectively, are associated with lung cancer. Additional work is required to map and understand the biological underpinnings of the strong association of these loci with lung cancer risk in African Americans.
Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.
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MeSH Terms
Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies multiple lung cancer susceptibility loci in never-smoking Asian women.
Wang Z, Seow WJ, Shiraishi K, Hsiung CA, Matsuo K, Liu J, Chen K, Yamji T, Yang Y, Chang IS, Wu C, Hong YC, Burdett L, Wyatt K, Chung CC, Li SA, Yeager M, Hutchinson A, Hu W, Caporaso N, Landi MT, Chatterjee N, Song M, Fraumeni JF, Kohno T, Yokota J, Kunitoh H, Ashikawa K, Momozawa Y, Daigo Y, Mitsudomi T, Yatabe Y, Hida T, Hu Z, Dai J, Ma H, Jin G, Song B, Wang Z, Cheng S, Yin Z, Li X, Ren Y, Guan P, Chang J, Tan W, Chen CJ, Chang GC, Tsai YH, Su WC, Chen KY, Huang MS, Chen YM, Zheng H, Li H, Cui P, Guo H, Xu P, Liu L, Iwasaki M, Shimazu T, Tsugane S, Zhu J, Jiang G, Fei K, Park JY, Kim YH, Sung JS, Park KH, Kim YT, Jung YJ, Kang CH, Park IK, Kim HN, Jeon HS, Choi JE, Choi YY, Kim JH, Oh IJ, Kim YC, Sung SW, Kim JS, Yoon HI, Kweon SS, Shin MH, Seow A, Chen Y, Lim WY, Liu J, Wong MP, Lee VH, Bassig BA, Tucker M, Berndt SI, Chow WH, Ji BT, Wang J, Xu J, Sihoe AD, Ho JC, Chan JK, Wang JC, Lu D, Zhao X, Zhao Z, Wu J, Chen H, Jin L, Wei F, Wu G, An SJ, Zhang XC, Su J, Wu YL, Gao YT, Xiang YB, He X, Li J, Zheng W, Shu XO, Cai Q, Klein R, Pao W, Lawrence C, Hosgood HD, Hsiao CF, Chien LH, Chen YH, Chen CH, Wang WC, Chen CY, Wang CL, Yu CJ, Chen HL, Su YC, Tsai FY, Chen YS, Li YJ, Yang TY, Lin CC, Yang PC, Wu T, Lin D, Zhou B, Yu J, Shen H, Kubo M, Chanock SJ, Rothman N, Lan Q
(2016) Hum Mol Genet 25: 620-9
MeSH Terms: Adult, Alleles, Asian Continental Ancestry Group, Case-Control Studies, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 12, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 6, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 9, Female, Genetic Loci, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genome-Wide Association Study, Humans, Lung Neoplasms, Odds Ratio, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Smoking
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2018
Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of lung cancer in Asian never-smoking women have previously identified six susceptibility loci associated with lung cancer risk. To further discover new susceptibility loci, we imputed data from four GWAS of Asian non-smoking female lung cancer (6877 cases and 6277 controls) using the 1000 Genomes Project (Phase 1 Release 3) data as the reference and genotyped additional samples (5878 cases and 7046 controls) for possible replication. In our meta-analysis, three new loci achieved genome-wide significance, marked by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs7741164 at 6p21.1 (per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.17; P = 5.8 × 10(-13)), rs72658409 at 9p21.3 (per-allele OR = 0.77; P = 1.41 × 10(-10)) and rs11610143 at 12q13.13 (per-allele OR = 0.89; P = 4.96 × 10(-9)). These findings identified new genetic susceptibility alleles for lung cancer in never-smoking women in Asia and merit follow-up to understand their biological underpinnings.
Published by Oxford University Press 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.
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Polymorphisms in a Putative Enhancer at the 10q21.2 Breast Cancer Risk Locus Regulate NRBF2 Expression.
Darabi H, McCue K, Beesley J, Michailidou K, Nord S, Kar S, Humphreys K, Thompson D, Ghoussaini M, Bolla MK, Dennis J, Wang Q, Canisius S, Scott CG, Apicella C, Hopper JL, Southey MC, Stone J, Broeks A, Schmidt MK, Scott RJ, Lophatananon A, Muir K, Beckmann MW, Ekici AB, Fasching PA, Heusinger K, Dos-Santos-Silva I, Peto J, Tomlinson I, Sawyer EJ, Burwinkel B, Marme F, Guénel P, Truong T, Bojesen SE, Flyger H, Benitez J, González-Neira A, Anton-Culver H, Neuhausen SL, Arndt V, Brenner H, Engel C, Meindl A, Schmutzler RK, German Consortium of Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer, Arnold N, Brauch H, Hamann U, Chang-Claude J, Khan S, Nevanlinna H, Ito H, Matsuo K, Bogdanova NV, Dörk T, Lindblom A, Margolin S, kConFab/AOCS Investigators, Kosma VM, Mannermaa A, Tseng CC, Wu AH, Floris G, Lambrechts D, Rudolph A, Peterlongo P, Radice P, Couch FJ, Vachon C, Giles GG, McLean C, Milne RL, Dugué PA, Haiman CA, Maskarinec G, Woolcott C, Henderson BE, Goldberg MS, Simard J, Teo SH, Mariapun S, Helland Å, Haakensen V, Zheng W, Beeghly-Fadiel A, Tamimi R, Jukkola-Vuorinen A, Winqvist R, Andrulis IL, Knight JA, Devilee P, Tollenaar RA, Figueroa J, García-Closas M, Czene K, Hooning MJ, Tilanus-Linthorst M, Li J, Gao YT, Shu XO, Cox A, Cross SS, Luben R, Khaw KT, Choi JY, Kang D, Hartman M, Lim WY, Kabisch M, Torres D, Jakubowska A, Lubinski J, McKay J, Sangrajrang S, Toland AE, Yannoukakos D, Shen CY, Yu JC, Ziogas A, Schoemaker MJ, Swerdlow A, Borresen-Dale AL, Kristensen V, French JD, Edwards SL, Dunning AM, Easton DF, Hall P, Chenevix-Trench G
(2015) Am J Hum Genet 97: 22-34
MeSH Terms: Age Factors, Asian Continental Ancestry Group, Autophagy-Related Proteins, Body Mass Index, Breast Neoplasms, Chromosome Mapping, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 10, DNA-Binding Proteins, Enhancer Elements, Genetic, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Gene Expression Regulation, Genome-Wide Association Study, Genotype, Humans, Luciferases, Odds Ratio, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Quantitative Trait Loci, Regression Analysis, Trans-Activators, Transcription Factors
Show Abstract · Added February 22, 2016
Genome-wide association studies have identified SNPs near ZNF365 at 10q21.2 that are associated with both breast cancer risk and mammographic density. To identify the most likely causal SNPs, we fine mapped the association signal by genotyping 428 SNPs across the region in 89,050 European and 12,893 Asian case and control subjects from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. We identified four independent sets of correlated, highly trait-associated variants (iCHAVs), three of which were located within ZNF365. The most strongly risk-associated SNP, rs10995201 in iCHAV1, showed clear evidence of association with both estrogen receptor (ER)-positive (OR = 0.85 [0.82-0.88]) and ER-negative (OR = 0.87 [0.82-0.91]) disease, and was also the SNP most strongly associated with percent mammographic density. iCHAV2 (lead SNP, chr10: 64,258,684:D) and iCHAV3 (lead SNP, rs7922449) were also associated with ER-positive (OR = 0.93 [0.91-0.95] and OR = 1.06 [1.03-1.09]) and ER-negative (OR = 0.95 [0.91-0.98] and OR = 1.08 [1.04-1.13]) disease. There was weaker evidence for iCHAV4, located 5' of ADO, associated only with ER-positive breast cancer (OR = 0.93 [0.90-0.96]). We found 12, 17, 18, and 2 candidate causal SNPs for breast cancer in iCHAVs 1-4, respectively. Chromosome conformation capture analysis showed that iCHAV2 interacts with the ZNF365 and NRBF2 (more than 600 kb away) promoters in normal and cancerous breast epithelial cells. Luciferase assays did not identify SNPs that affect transactivation of ZNF365, but identified a protective haplotype in iCHAV2, associated with silencing of the NRBF2 promoter, implicating this gene in the etiology of breast cancer.
Copyright © 2015 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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22 MeSH Terms