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Local ancestry transitions modify snp-trait associations.
Fish AE, Crawford DC, Capra JA, Bush WS
(2018) Pac Symp Biocomput 23: 424-435
MeSH Terms: Adult, African Continental Ancestry Group, Chromosomes, Human, Computational Biology, Epistasis, Genetic, European Continental Ancestry Group, Evolution, Molecular, Gene Frequency, Genetics, Population, Genome-Wide Association Study, Haplotypes, Humans, Linear Models, Models, Genetic, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Recombination, Genetic
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Genomic maps of local ancestry identify ancestry transitions - points on a chromosome where recent recombination events in admixed individuals have joined two different ancestral haplotypes. These events bring together alleles that evolved within separate continential populations, providing a unique opportunity to evaluate the joint effect of these alleles on health outcomes. In this work, we evaluate the impact of genetic variants in the context of nearby local ancestry transitions within a sample of nearly 10,000 adults of African ancestry with traits derived from electronic health records. Genetic data was located using the Metabochip, and used to derive local ancestry. We develop a model that captures the effect of both single variants and local ancestry, and use it to identify examples where local ancestry transitions significantly interact with nearby variants to influence metabolic traits. In our most compelling example, we find that the minor allele of rs16890640 occuring on a European background with a downstream local ancestry transition to African ancestry results in significantly lower mean corpuscular hemoglobin and volume. This finding represents a new way of discovering genetic interactions, and is supported by molecular data that suggest changes to local ancestry may impact local chromatin looping.
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16 MeSH Terms
Landscape of X chromosome inactivation across human tissues.
Tukiainen T, Villani AC, Yen A, Rivas MA, Marshall JL, Satija R, Aguirre M, Gauthier L, Fleharty M, Kirby A, Cummings BB, Castel SE, Karczewski KJ, Aguet F, Byrnes A, GTEx Consortium, Laboratory, Data Analysis &Coordinating Center (LDACC)—Analysis Working Group, Statistical Methods groups—Analysis Working Group, Enhancing GTEx (eGTEx) groups, NIH Common Fund, NIH/NCI, NIH/NHGRI, NIH/NIMH, NIH/NIDA, Biospecimen Collection Source Site—NDRI, Biospecimen Collection Source Site—RPCI, Biospecimen Core Resource—VARI, Brain Bank Repository—University of Miami Brain Endowment Bank, Leidos Biomedical—Project Management, ELSI Study, Genome Browser Data Integration &Visualization—EBI, Genome Browser Data Integration &Visualization—UCSC Genomics Institute, University of California Santa Cruz, Lappalainen T, Regev A, Ardlie KG, Hacohen N, MacArthur DG
(2017) Nature 550: 244-248
MeSH Terms: Chromosomes, Human, X, Female, Genes, X-Linked, Genome, Human, Genomics, Humans, Male, Organ Specificity, Phenotype, Sequence Analysis, RNA, Single-Cell Analysis, Transcriptome, X Chromosome Inactivation
Show Abstract · Added October 27, 2017
X chromosome inactivation (XCI) silences transcription from one of the two X chromosomes in female mammalian cells to balance expression dosage between XX females and XY males. XCI is, however, incomplete in humans: up to one-third of X-chromosomal genes are expressed from both the active and inactive X chromosomes (Xa and Xi, respectively) in female cells, with the degree of 'escape' from inactivation varying between genes and individuals. The extent to which XCI is shared between cells and tissues remains poorly characterized, as does the degree to which incomplete XCI manifests as detectable sex differences in gene expression and phenotypic traits. Here we describe a systematic survey of XCI, integrating over 5,500 transcriptomes from 449 individuals spanning 29 tissues from GTEx (v6p release) and 940 single-cell transcriptomes, combined with genomic sequence data. We show that XCI at 683 X-chromosomal genes is generally uniform across human tissues, but identify examples of heterogeneity between tissues, individuals and cells. We show that incomplete XCI affects at least 23% of X-chromosomal genes, identify seven genes that escape XCI with support from multiple lines of evidence and demonstrate that escape from XCI results in sex biases in gene expression, establishing incomplete XCI as a mechanism that is likely to introduce phenotypic diversity. Overall, this updated catalogue of XCI across human tissues helps to increase our understanding of the extent and impact of the incompleteness in the maintenance of XCI.
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13 MeSH Terms
Genetic effects on gene expression across human tissues.
GTEx Consortium, Laboratory, Data Analysis &Coordinating Center (LDACC)—Analysis Working Group, Statistical Methods groups—Analysis Working Group, Enhancing GTEx (eGTEx) groups, NIH Common Fund, NIH/NCI, NIH/NHGRI, NIH/NIMH, NIH/NIDA, Biospecimen Collection Source Site—NDRI, Biospecimen Collection Source Site—RPCI, Biospecimen Core Resource—VARI, Brain Bank Repository—University of Miami Brain Endowment Bank, Leidos Biomedical—Project Management, ELSI Study, Genome Browser Data Integration &Visualization—EBI, Genome Browser Data Integration &Visualization—UCSC Genomics Institute, University of California Santa Cruz, Lead analysts:, Laboratory, Data Analysis &Coordinating Center (LDACC):, NIH program management:, Biospecimen collection:, Pathology:, eQTL manuscript working group:, Battle A, Brown CD, Engelhardt BE, Montgomery SB
(2017) Nature 550: 204-213
MeSH Terms: Alleles, Chromosomes, Human, Disease, Female, Gene Expression Profiling, Gene Expression Regulation, Genetic Variation, Genome, Human, Genotype, Humans, Male, Organ Specificity, Quantitative Trait Loci
Show Abstract · Added October 27, 2017
Characterization of the molecular function of the human genome and its variation across individuals is essential for identifying the cellular mechanisms that underlie human genetic traits and diseases. The Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project aims to characterize variation in gene expression levels across individuals and diverse tissues of the human body, many of which are not easily accessible. Here we describe genetic effects on gene expression levels across 44 human tissues. We find that local genetic variation affects gene expression levels for the majority of genes, and we further identify inter-chromosomal genetic effects for 93 genes and 112 loci. On the basis of the identified genetic effects, we characterize patterns of tissue specificity, compare local and distal effects, and evaluate the functional properties of the genetic effects. We also demonstrate that multi-tissue, multi-individual data can be used to identify genes and pathways affected by human disease-associated variation, enabling a mechanistic interpretation of gene regulation and the genetic basis of disease.
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13 MeSH Terms
Genetic Interactions with Age, Sex, Body Mass Index, and Hypertension in Relation to Atrial Fibrillation: The AFGen Consortium.
Weng LC, Lunetta KL, Müller-Nurasyid M, Smith AV, Thériault S, Weeke PE, Barnard J, Bis JC, Lyytikäinen LP, Kleber ME, Martinsson A, Lin HJ, Rienstra M, Trompet S, Krijthe BP, Dörr M, Klarin D, Chasman DI, Sinner MF, Waldenberger M, Launer LJ, Harris TB, Soliman EZ, Alonso A, Paré G, Teixeira PL, Denny JC, Shoemaker MB, Van Wagoner DR, Smith JD, Psaty BM, Sotoodehnia N, Taylor KD, Kähönen M, Nikus K, Delgado GE, Melander O, Engström G, Yao J, Guo X, Christophersen IE, Ellinor PT, Geelhoed B, Verweij N, Macfarlane P, Ford I, Heeringa J, Franco OH, Uitterlinden AG, Völker U, Teumer A, Rose LM, Kääb S, Gudnason V, Arking DE, Conen D, Roden DM, Chung MK, Heckbert SR, Benjamin EJ, Lehtimäki T, März W, Smith JG, Rotter JI, van der Harst P, Jukema JW, Stricker BH, Felix SB, Albert CM, Lubitz SA
(2017) Sci Rep 7: 11303
MeSH Terms: Age Factors, Aged, Atrial Fibrillation, Body Mass Index, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 4, Epistasis, Genetic, Female, Genetic Loci, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genome-Wide Association Study, Humans, Hypertension, Male, Middle Aged, Odds Ratio, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Reproducibility of Results, Risk Factors, Sex Characteristics
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
It is unclear whether genetic markers interact with risk factors to influence atrial fibrillation (AF) risk. We performed genome-wide interaction analyses between genetic variants and age, sex, hypertension, and body mass index in the AFGen Consortium. Study-specific results were combined using meta-analysis (88,383 individuals of European descent, including 7,292 with AF). Variants with nominal interaction associations in the discovery analysis were tested for association in four independent studies (131,441 individuals, including 5,722 with AF). In the discovery analysis, the AF risk associated with the minor rs6817105 allele (at the PITX2 locus) was greater among subjects ≤ 65 years of age than among those > 65 years (interaction p-value = 4.0 × 10). The interaction p-value exceeded genome-wide significance in combined discovery and replication analyses (interaction p-value = 1.7 × 10). We observed one genome-wide significant interaction with body mass index and several suggestive interactions with age, sex, and body mass index in the discovery analysis. However, none was replicated in the independent sample. Our findings suggest that the pathogenesis of AF may differ according to age in individuals of European descent, but we did not observe evidence of statistically significant genetic interactions with sex, body mass index, or hypertension on AF risk.
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19 MeSH Terms
African genetic ancestry interacts with body mass index to modify risk for uterine fibroids.
Giri A, Edwards TL, Hartmann KE, Torstenson ES, Wellons M, Schreiner PJ, Velez Edwards DR
(2017) PLoS Genet 13: e1006871
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, African Continental Ancestry Group, Body Mass Index, Case-Control Studies, Chromosome Mapping, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 2, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 6, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Genotyping Techniques, Humans, Leiomyoma, Logistic Models, Obesity, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added February 21, 2019
Race, specifically African ancestry, and obesity are important risk factors for uterine fibroids, and likely interact to provide the right conditions for fibroid growth. However, existing studies largely focus on the main-effects rather than their interaction. Here, we firstly provide evidence for interaction between categories of body mass index (BMI) and reported-race in relation to uterine fibroids. We then investigate whether the association between inferred local European ancestry and fibroid risk is modified by BMI in African American (AA) women in the Vanderbilt University Medical Center bio-repository (BioVU) (539 cases and 794 controls) and the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study (CARDIA, 264 cases and 173 controls). We used multiple logistic regression to evaluate interactions between local European ancestry and BMI in relation to fibroid risk, then performed fixed effects meta-analysis. Statistical significance threshold for local-ancestry and BMI interactions was empirically estimated with 10,000 permutations (p-value = 1.18x10-4). Admixture mapping detected an association between European ancestry and fibroid risk which was modified by BMI (continuous-interaction p-value = 3.75x10-5) around ADTRP (chromosome 6p24); the strongest association was found in the obese category (ancestry odds ratio (AOR) = 0.51, p-value = 2.23x10-5). Evaluation of interaction between genotyped/imputed variants and BMI in this targeted region suggested race-specific interaction, present in AAs only; strongest evidence was found for insertion/deletion variant (6:11946435), again in the obese category (OR = 1.66, p-value = 1.72x10-6). We found nominal evidence for interaction between local ancestry and BMI at a previously reported region in chromosome 2q31-32, which includes COL5A2, and TFPI, an immediate downstream target of ADTRP. Interactions between BMI and SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms) found in this region in AA women were also detected in an independent European American population of 1,195 cases and 1,164 controls. Findings from our study provide an example of how modifiable and non-modifiable factors may interact to influence fibroid risk and suggest a biological role for BMI in fibroid etiology.
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MeSH Terms
Type 2 Diabetes Variants Disrupt Function of SLC16A11 through Two Distinct Mechanisms.
Rusu V, Hoch E, Mercader JM, Tenen DE, Gymrek M, Hartigan CR, DeRan M, von Grotthuss M, Fontanillas P, Spooner A, Guzman G, Deik AA, Pierce KA, Dennis C, Clish CB, Carr SA, Wagner BK, Schenone M, Ng MCY, Chen BH, MEDIA Consortium, SIGMA T2D Consortium, Centeno-Cruz F, Zerrweck C, Orozco L, Altshuler DM, Schreiber SL, Florez JC, Jacobs SBR, Lander ES
(2017) Cell 170: 199-212.e20
MeSH Terms: Basigin, Cell Membrane, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 17, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Gene Knockdown Techniques, Haplotypes, Hepatocytes, Heterozygote, Histone Code, Humans, Liver, Models, Molecular, Monocarboxylic Acid Transporters
Show Abstract · Added September 20, 2017
Type 2 diabetes (T2D) affects Latinos at twice the rate seen in populations of European descent. We recently identified a risk haplotype spanning SLC16A11 that explains ∼20% of the increased T2D prevalence in Mexico. Here, through genetic fine-mapping, we define a set of tightly linked variants likely to contain the causal allele(s). We show that variants on the T2D-associated haplotype have two distinct effects: (1) decreasing SLC16A11 expression in liver and (2) disrupting a key interaction with basigin, thereby reducing cell-surface localization. Both independent mechanisms reduce SLC16A11 function and suggest SLC16A11 is the causal gene at this locus. To gain insight into how SLC16A11 disruption impacts T2D risk, we demonstrate that SLC16A11 is a proton-coupled monocarboxylate transporter and that genetic perturbation of SLC16A11 induces changes in fatty acid and lipid metabolism that are associated with increased T2D risk. Our findings suggest that increasing SLC16A11 function could be therapeutically beneficial for T2D. VIDEO ABSTRACT.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Genome-wide association study to identify variants associated with acute severe vaso-occlusive pain in sickle cell anemia.
Chaturvedi S, Bhatnagar P, Bean CJ, Steinberg MH, Milton JN, Casella JF, Barron-Casella E, Arking DE, DeBaun MR
(2017) Blood 130: 686-688
MeSH Terms: Acute Pain, Adolescent, African Continental Ancestry Group, Anemia, Sickle Cell, Arterial Occlusive Diseases, Child, Child, Preschool, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 4, Epistasis, Genetic, Female, Fetal Hemoglobin, Genetic Variation, Genome-Wide Association Study, Genotyping Techniques, Humans, Male, Multicenter Studies as Topic, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Prospective Studies
Added June 7, 2017
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19 MeSH Terms
Mutant IDH1 and seizures in patients with glioma.
Chen H, Judkins J, Thomas C, Wu M, Khoury L, Benjamin CG, Pacione D, Golfinos JG, Kumthekar P, Ghamsari F, Chen L, Lein P, Chetkovich DM, Snuderl M, Horbinski C
(2017) Neurology 88: 1805-1813
MeSH Terms: Action Potentials, Animals, Brain Neoplasms, Cells, Cultured, Cerebral Cortex, Chromosome Deletion, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 1, Female, Glioma, Glutarates, Humans, Isocitrate Dehydrogenase, Male, Middle Aged, Mutation, Neoplasm Grading, Neurons, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Retrospective Studies, Seizures
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
OBJECTIVE - Because the d-2-hydroxyglutarate (D2HG) product of mutant isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) is released by tumor cells into the microenvironment and is structurally similar to the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate, we sought to determine whether IDH1 increases the risk of seizures in patients with glioma, and whether D2HG increases the electrical activity of neurons.
METHODS - Three WHO grade II-IV glioma cohorts from separate institutions (total N = 712) were retrospectively assessed for the presence of preoperative seizures and tumor location, WHO grade, 1p/19q codeletion, and IDH1 status. Rat cortical neurons were grown on microelectrode arrays, and their electrical activity was measured before and after treatment with exogenous D2HG, in the presence or absence of the selective NMDA antagonist, AP5.
RESULTS - Preoperative seizures were observed in 18%-34% of IDH1 wild-type (IDH1) patients and in 59%-74% of IDH1 patients ( < 0.001). Multivariable analysis, including WHO grade, 1p/19q codeletion, and temporal lobe location, showed that IDH1 was an independent correlate with seizures (odds ratio 2.5, 95% confidence interval 1.6-3.9, < 0.001). Exogenous D2HG increased the firing rate of cultured rat cortical neurons 4- to 6-fold, but was completely blocked by AP5.
CONCLUSIONS - The D2HG product of IDH1 may increase neuronal activity by mimicking the activity of glutamate on the NMDA receptor, and IDH1 gliomas are more likely to cause seizures in patients. This has rapid translational implications for the personalized management of tumor-associated epilepsy, as targeted IDH1 inhibitors may improve antiepileptic therapy in patients with IDH1 gliomas.
© 2017 American Academy of Neurology.
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A 3q gene signature associated with triple negative breast cancer organ specific metastasis and response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
Qian J, Chen H, Ji X, Eisenberg R, Chakravarthy AB, Mayer IA, Massion PP
(2017) Sci Rep 7: 45828
MeSH Terms: Biomarkers, Tumor, Chemotherapy, Adjuvant, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 3, Disease-Free Survival, Female, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Humans, Neoplasm Metastasis, RNA-Binding Proteins, Triple Negative Breast Neoplasms
Show Abstract · Added January 29, 2018
Triple negative breast cancers (TNBC) are aggressive tumors, with high rates of metastatic spread and targeted therapies are critically needed. We aimed to assess the prognostic and predictive value of a 3q 19-gene signature identified previously from lung cancer in a collection of 4,801 breast tumor gene expression data. The 3q gene signature had a strong association with features of aggressiveness such as high grade, hormone receptor negativity, presence of a basal-like or TNBC phenotype and reduced distant metastasis free survival. The 3q gene signature was strongly associated with lung metastasis only in TNBC (P < 0.0001, Hazard ratio (HR) 1.44, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.31-1.60), significantly associated with brain but not bone metastasis regardless of TNBC status. The association of one 3q driver gene FXR1 with distant metastasis in TNBC (P = 0.01) was further validated by immunohistochemistry. In addition, the 3q gene signature was associated with better response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in TNBC (P < 0.0001) but not in non-TNBC patients. Our study suggests that the 3q gene signature is a novel prognostic marker for lung and/or brain metastasis and a predictive marker for the response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in TNBC, implying a potential role for 3q genes in the mechanism of organ-specific metastasis.
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11 MeSH Terms
Rare variants in fox-1 homolog A (RBFOX1) are associated with lower blood pressure.
He KY, Wang H, Cade BE, Nandakumar P, Giri A, Ware EB, Haessler J, Liang J, Smith JA, Franceschini N, Le TH, Kooperberg C, Edwards TL, Kardia SL, Lin X, Chakravarti A, Redline S, Zhu X
(2017) PLoS Genet 13: e1006678
MeSH Terms: Adult, Blood Pressure, Body Mass Index, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 16, European Continental Ancestry Group, Family Health, Female, Gene Expression, Gene Frequency, Genetic Linkage, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genome-Wide Association Study, Genotype, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Pedigree, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, RNA Splicing Factors
Show Abstract · Added April 26, 2017
Many large genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified common blood pressure (BP) variants. However, most of the identified BP variants do not overlap with the linkage evidence observed from family studies. We thus hypothesize that multiple rare variants contribute to the observed linkage evidence. We performed linkage analysis using 517 individuals in 130 European families from the Cleveland Family Study (CFS) who have been genotyped on the Illumina OmniExpress Exome array. The largest linkage peak was observed on chromosome 16p13 (MLOD = 2.81) for systolic blood pressure (SBP). Follow-up conditional linkage and association analyses in the linkage region identified multiple rare, coding variants in RBFOX1 associated with reduced SBP. In a 17-member CFS family, carriers of the missense variant rs149974858 are normotensive despite being obese (average BMI = 60 kg/m2). Gene-based association test of rare variants using SKAT-O showed significant association with SBP (p-value = 0.00403) and DBP (p-value = 0.0258) in the CFS participants and the association was replicated in large independent replication studies (N = 57,234, p-value = 0.013 for SBP, 0.0023 for PP). RBFOX1 is expressed in brain tissues, the atrial appendage and left ventricle in the heart, and in skeletal muscle tissues, organs/tissues which are potentially related to blood pressure. Our study showed that associations of rare variants could be efficiently detected using family information.
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19 MeSH Terms