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Topoisomerase II and leukemia.
Pendleton M, Lindsey RH, Felix CA, Grimwade D, Osheroff N
(2014) Ann N Y Acad Sci 1310: 98-110
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antineoplastic Agents, Catechin, Cell Transformation, Neoplastic, Chromosome Breakage, Curcumin, DNA Topoisomerases, Type II, Genistein, Humans, Infant, Leukemia, Neoplasms, Second Primary, Translocation, Genetic
Show Abstract · Added March 13, 2014
Type II topoisomerases are essential enzymes that modulate DNA under- and overwinding, knotting, and tangling. Beyond their critical physiological functions, these enzymes are the targets for some of the most widely prescribed anticancer drugs (topoisomerase II poisons) in clinical use. Topoisomerase II poisons kill cells by increasing levels of covalent enzyme-cleaved DNA complexes that are normal reaction intermediates. Drugs such as etoposide, doxorubicin, and mitoxantrone are frontline therapies for a variety of solid tumors and hematological malignancies. Unfortunately, their use also is associated with the development of specific leukemias. Regimens that include etoposide or doxorubicin are linked to the occurrence of acute myeloid leukemias that feature rearrangements at chromosomal band 11q23. Similar rearrangements are seen in infant leukemias and are associated with gestational diets that are high in naturally occurring topoisomerase II-active compounds. Finally, regimens that include mitoxantrone and epirubicin are linked to acute promyelocytic leukemias that feature t(15;17) rearrangements. The first part of this article will focus on type II topoisomerases and describe the mechanism of enzyme and drug action. The second part will discuss how topoisomerase II poisons trigger chromosomal breaks that lead to leukemia and potential approaches for dissociating the actions of drugs from their leukemogenic potential.
© 2014 New York Academy of Sciences.
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13 MeSH Terms
Tp53 codon-72 polymorphisms identify different radiation sensitivities to g2-chromosome breakage in human lymphoblast cells.
Schwartz JL, Plotnik D, Slovic J, Li T, Racelis M, Deeg HJ, Friedman DL
(2011) Environ Mol Mutagen 52: 77-80
MeSH Terms: Cells, Cultured, Cesium Radioisotopes, Chromosome Breakage, Codon, Genes, p53, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Humans, Lymphocytes, Polymorphism, Genetic, Radiation Tolerance
Show Abstract · Added March 27, 2014
Both the G2 chromosomal radiosensitivity assay and allelic differences in TP53 codon-72 have been associated with cancer predisposition. The relationship between the two endpoints was determined in 56 human EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines. Although there were overlapping distributions of sensitivity for the different genotypes, cell lines that were homozygous for the proline coding allele were more likely to be resistant to chromatid break formation than those containing two arginine coding alleles, whereas cell lines expressing both the proline and arginine codon were either resistant like proline-proline lines or sensitive like arginine-arginine lines. The results support an important role of the TP53 codon-72 polymorphism in modifying G2-chromosome radiosensitivity. Distinguishing the effect of TP53 codon-72 variations from other modifiers of G2-chromosome radiosensitivity might aid in identifying new markers of cancer risk.
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10 MeSH Terms
Stimulation of topoisomerase II-mediated DNA cleavage by benzene metabolites.
Lindsey RH, Bender RP, Osheroff N
(2005) Chem Biol Interact 153-154: 197-205
MeSH Terms: Antigens, Neoplasm, Benzene, Benzoquinones, Chromosome Breakage, DNA Damage, DNA Topoisomerases, Type II, DNA-Binding Proteins, Humans, Topoisomerase II Inhibitors, Tumor Cells, Cultured
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
Benzene is a human carcinogen that induces hematopoietic malignancies. It is believed that benzene does not initiate leukemias directly, but rather generates DNA damage through a series of phenolic and quinone-based metabolites, especially 1,4-benzoquinone. Since the DNA damage induced by 1,4-benzoquinone is consistent with that of topoisomerase II-targeted drugs, it has been proposed that the compound initiates specific types of leukemia by acting as a topoisomerase II poison. This hypothesis, however, was not supported by initial in vitro studies. While 1,4-benzoquinone inhibited topoisomerase II catalysis, increases in enzyme-mediated DNA cleavage were not observed. Because of the potential involvement of topoisomerase II in benzene-induced leukemias, we re-examined the effects of benzene metabolites (including 1,4-benzoquinone, 1,4-hydroquinone, catechol, 1,2,4-benzenetriol, 2,2'-biphenol, and 4,4'-biphenol) on DNA cleavage mediated by human topoisomerase IIalpha. In contrast to previous reports, we found that 1,4-benzoquinone was a strong topoisomerase II poison and was more potent in vitro than the anticancer drug etoposide. Other metabolites displayed considerably less activity. DNA cleavage enhancement by 1,4-benzoquinone was unseen in previous studies due to the presence of reducing agents and the incubation of 1,4-benzoquinone with the enzyme prior to the addition of DNA. Unlike anticancer drugs such as etoposide that interact with topoisomerase IIalpha in a noncovalent manner, the actions of 1,4-benzoquinone appear to involve a covalent attachment to the enzyme. Finally, 1,4-benzoquinone stimulated DNA cleavage by topoisomerase IIalpha in cultured human cells. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that topoisomerase IIalpha plays a role in the initiation of some benzene-induced leukemias.
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10 MeSH Terms
N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine, the toxic metabolite of acetaminophen, is a topoisomerase II poison.
Bender RP, Lindsey RH, Burden DA, Osheroff N
(2004) Biochemistry 43: 3731-9
MeSH Terms: Acetaminophen, Antigens, Neoplasm, Antineoplastic Agents, Benzoquinones, Cell Line, Tumor, Chromosome Breakage, DNA Damage, DNA Topoisomerases, Type I, DNA Topoisomerases, Type II, DNA-Binding Proteins, Etoposide, Humans, Imines, Mutagens, Topoisomerase II Inhibitors
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
Although acetaminophen is the most widely used analgesic in the world, it is also a leading cause of toxic drug overdoses. Beyond normal therapeutic doses, the drug is hepatotoxic and genotoxic. All of the harmful effects of acetaminophen have been attributed to the production of its toxic metabolite, N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI). Since many of the cytotoxic/genotoxic events triggered by NAPQI are consistent with the actions of topoisomerase II-targeted drugs, the effects of this metabolite on human topoisomerase IIalpha were examined. NAPQI was a strong topoisomerase II poison and increased levels of enzyme-mediated DNA cleavage >5-fold at 100 microM. The compound induced scission at a number of DNA sites that were similar to those observed in the presence of the topoisomerase II-targeted anticancer drug etoposide; however, the relative site utilization differed. NAPQI strongly impaired the ability of topoisomerase IIalpha to reseal cleaved DNA molecules, suggesting that inhibition of DNA religation is the primary mechanism underlying cleavage enhancement. In addition to its effects in purified systems, NAPQI appeared to increase levels of DNA scission mediated by human topoisomerase IIalpha in cultured CEM leukemia cells. In contrast, acetaminophen did not significantly affect the DNA cleavage activity of the human enzyme in vitro or in cultured CEM cells. Furthermore, the analgesic did not interfere with the actions of etoposide against the type II enzyme. These results suggest that at least some of the cytotoxic/genotoxic effects caused by acetaminophen overdose may be mediated by the actions of NAPQI as a topoisomerase II poison.
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15 MeSH Terms
MLL-SEPTIN6 fusion recurs in novel translocation of chromosomes 3, X, and 11 in infant acute myelomonocytic leukaemia and in t(X;11) in infant acute myeloid leukaemia, and MLL genomic breakpoint in complex MLL-SEPTIN6 rearrangement is a DNA topoisomerase II cleavage site.
Slater DJ, Hilgenfeld E, Rappaport EF, Shah N, Meek RG, Williams WR, Lovett BD, Osheroff N, Autar RS, Ried T, Felix CA
(2002) Oncogene 21: 4706-14
MeSH Terms: Acute Disease, Base Sequence, Chromosome Breakage, Chromosome Mapping, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 11, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 3, Cytoskeletal Proteins, DNA Topoisomerases, Type II, DNA-Binding Proteins, GTP-Binding Proteins, Histone-Lysine N-Methyltransferase, Humans, In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence, Infant, Leukemia, Myeloid, Leukemia, Myelomonocytic, Acute, Molecular Sequence Data, Myeloid-Lymphoid Leukemia Protein, Proto-Oncogenes, Septins, Transcription Factors, Translocation, Genetic, X Chromosome
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
We examined the MLL translocation in two cases of infant AML with X chromosome disruption. The G-banded karyotype in the first case suggested t(X;3)(q22;p21)ins(X;11)(q22;q13q25). Southern blot analysis showed one MLL rearrangement. Panhandle PCR approaches were used to identify the MLL fusion transcript and MLL genomic breakpoint junction. SEPTIN6 from chromosome band Xq24 was the partner gene of MLL. MLL exon 7 was joined in-frame to SEPTIN6 exon 2 in the fusion transcript. The MLL genomic breakpoint was in intron 7; the SEPTIN6 genomic breakpoint was in intron 1. Spectral karyotyping revealed a complex rearrangement disrupting band 11q23. FISH with a probe for MLL confirmed MLL involvement and showed that the MLL-SEPTIN6 junction was on the der(X). The MLL genomic breakpoint was a functional DNA topoisomerase II cleavage site in an in vitro assay. In the second case, the karyotype revealed t(X;11)(q22;q23). Southern blot analysis showed two MLL rearrangements. cDNA panhandle PCR detected a transcript fusing MLL exon 8 in-frame to SEPTIN6 exon 2. MLL and SEPTIN6 are vulnerable to damage to form recurrent translocations in infant AML. Identification of SEPTIN6 and the SEPTIN family members hCDCrel and MSF as partner genes of MLL suggests a common pathway to leukaemogenesis.
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23 MeSH Terms
Near-precise interchromosomal recombination and functional DNA topoisomerase II cleavage sites at MLL and AF-4 genomic breakpoints in treatment-related acute lymphoblastic leukemia with t(4;11) translocation.
Lovett BD, Lo Nigro L, Rappaport EF, Blair IA, Osheroff N, Zheng N, Megonigal MD, Williams WR, Nowell PC, Felix CA
(2001) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 98: 9802-7
MeSH Terms: Antigens, Neoplasm, Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols, Catechols, Child, Chromosome Breakage, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 11, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 4, Combined Modality Therapy, Cyclophosphamide, DNA Topoisomerases, Type II, DNA, Neoplasm, DNA-Binding Proteins, Dactinomycin, Etoposide, Female, Histone-Lysine N-Methyltransferase, Humans, Ifosfamide, Isoenzymes, Models, Genetic, Molecular Sequence Data, Myeloid-Lymphoid Leukemia Protein, Neoplasm Proteins, Neoplasms, Second Primary, Nuclear Proteins, Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma, Proto-Oncogenes, Radiotherapy, Adjuvant, Recombination, Genetic, Rhabdomyosarcoma, Alveolar, Soft Tissue Neoplasms, Transcription Factors, Transcriptional Elongation Factors, Translocation, Genetic, Vincristine
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
We analyzed the der(11) and der(4) genomic breakpoint junctions of a t(4;11) in the leukemia of a patient previously administered etoposide and dactinomycin by molecular and biochemical approaches to gain insights about the translocation mechanism and the relevant drug exposure. The genomic breakpoint junctions were amplified by PCR. Cleavage of DNA substrates containing the normal homologues of the MLL and AF-4 translocation breakpoints was examined in vitro upon incubation with human DNA topoisomerase IIalpha and etoposide, etoposide catechol, etoposide quinone, or dactinomycin. The der(11) and der(4) genomic breakpoint junctions both involved MLL intron 6 and AF-4 intron 3. Recombination was precise at the sequence level except for the overall gain of a single templated nucleotide. The translocation breakpoints in MLL and AF-4 were DNA topoisomerase II cleavage sites. Etoposide and its metabolites, but not dactinomycin, enhanced cleavage at these sites. Assuming that DNA topoisomerase II was the mediator of the breakage, processing of the staggered nicks induced by DNA topoisomerase II, including exonucleolytic deletion and template-directed polymerization, would have been required before ligation of the ends to generate the observed genomic breakpoint junctions. These data are inconsistent with a translocation mechanism involving interchromosomal recombination by simple exchange of DNA topoisomerase II subunits and DNA-strand transfer; however, consistent with reciprocal DNA topoisomerase II cleavage events in MLL and AF-4 in which both breaks became stable, the DNA ends were processed and underwent ligation. Etoposide and/or its metabolites, but not dactinomycin, likely were the relevant exposures in this patient.
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35 MeSH Terms
Etoposide metabolites enhance DNA topoisomerase II cleavage near leukemia-associated MLL translocation breakpoints.
Lovett BD, Strumberg D, Blair IA, Pang S, Burden DA, Megonigal MD, Rappaport EF, Rebbeck TR, Osheroff N, Pommier YG, Felix CA
(2001) Biochemistry 40: 1159-70
MeSH Terms: Catechols, Chromosome Breakage, DNA Damage, DNA Topoisomerases, Type II, DNA-Binding Proteins, Enzyme Stability, Etoposide, Histone-Lysine N-Methyltransferase, Humans, Introns, Leukemia, Lymphoid, Leukemia, Myeloid, Myeloid-Lymphoid Leukemia Protein, Oligonucleotides, Proto-Oncogenes, Quinones, Substrate Specificity, Transcription Factors, Translocation, Genetic
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
Chromosomal breakage resulting from stabilization of DNA topoisomerase II covalent complexes by epipodophyllotoxins may play a role in the genesis of leukemia-associated MLL gene translocations. We investigated whether etoposide catechol and quinone metabolites can damage the MLL breakpoint cluster region in a DNA topoisomerase II-dependent manner like the parent drug and the nature of the damage. Cleavage of two DNA substrates containing the normal homologues of five MLL intron 6 translocation breakpoints was examined in vitro upon incubation with human DNA topoisomerase IIalpha, ATP, and either etoposide, etoposide catechol, or etoposide quinone. Many of the same cleavage sites were induced by etoposide and by its metabolites, but several unique sites were induced by the metabolites. There was a preference for G(-1) among the unique sites, which differs from the parent drug. Cleavage at most sites was greater and more heat-stable in the presence of the metabolites compared to etoposide. The MLL translocation breakpoints contained within the substrates were near strong and/or stable cleavage sites. The metabolites induced more cleavage than etoposide at the same sites within a 40 bp double-stranded oligonucleotide containing two of the translocation breakpoints, confirming the results at a subset of the sites. Cleavage assays using the same oligonucleotide substrate in which guanines at several positions were replaced with N7-deaza guanines indicated that the N7 position of guanine is important in metabolite-induced cleavage, possibly suggesting N7-guanine alkylation by etoposide quinone. Not only etoposide, but also its metabolites, enhance DNA topoisomerase II cleavage near MLL translocation breakpoints in in vitro assays. It is possible that etoposide metabolites may be relevant to translocations.
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19 MeSH Terms
The response of eukaryotic topoisomerases to DNA damage.
Kingma PS, Osheroff N
(1998) Biochim Biophys Acta 1400: 223-32
MeSH Terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Cell Death, Chromosome Breakage, DNA, DNA Damage, DNA Topoisomerases, Type I, DNA Topoisomerases, Type II, Eukaryotic Cells, Mutagenesis, Ultraviolet Rays
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
Beyond the known mutagenic properties of DNA lesions, recent evidence indicates that several forms of genomic damage dramatically influence the catalytic activities of DNA topoisomerases. Apurinic sites, apyrimidinic sites, base mismatches, and ultraviolet photoproducts all enhance topoisomerase I-mediated DNA cleavage when they are located in close proximity to the point of scission. Furthermore, when located between the points of scission of a topoisomerase II cleavage site, these same lesions (with the exception of ultraviolet photoproducts) greatly stimulate the cleavage activity of the type II enzyme. Thus, as found for anticancer drugs, lesions have the capacity to convert topoisomerases from essential cellular enzymes to potent DNA toxins. These findings raise exciting new questions regarding the mechanism of anticancer drugs, the physiological functions of topoisomerases, and the processing of DNA damage in the cell.
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10 MeSH Terms