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Results: 1 to 10 of 1878

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Maternal microbial molecules affect offspring health.
Ferguson J
(2020) Science 367: 978-979
MeSH Terms: Animals, Child, Child Health, Diet, High-Fat, Female, Gastrointestinal Microbiome, Mice, Obesity, Phenotype, Pregnancy
Added March 3, 2020
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10 MeSH Terms
Posterior circulation strokes in children: Fearsome or not?
Jordan LC, Jacobs BS
(2020) Neurology 94: 149-150
MeSH Terms: Cerebrovascular Circulation, Child, Humans, Stroke
Added March 24, 2020
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Penicillin Allergy.
Castells M, Khan DA, Phillips EJ
(2019) N Engl J Med 381: 2338-2351
MeSH Terms: Adult, Anaphylaxis, Anti-Bacterial Agents, Child, Desensitization, Immunologic, Drug Hypersensitivity, Humans, Immunologic Tests, Penicillins, Skin Tests
Added March 30, 2020
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Cerebral hemodynamics and metabolism are similar in sickle cell disease patients with hemoglobin SS and Sβ thalassemia phenotypes.
Ikwuanusi I, Jordan LC, Lee CA, Patel NJ, Waddle S, Pruthi S, Davis LT, Griffin A, DeBaun MR, Kassim AA, Donahue MJ
(2020) Am J Hematol 95: E66-E68
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Anemia, Sickle Cell, Cerebrovascular Circulation, Child, Female, Hemodynamics, Hemoglobin, Sickle, Humans, Male, Thalassemia
Added March 24, 2020
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11 MeSH Terms
Temporo-frontal activation during phonological processing predicts gains in arithmetic facts in young children.
Suárez-Pellicioni M, Fuchs L, Booth JR
(2019) Dev Cogn Neurosci 40: 100735
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Brain, Brain Mapping, Child, Female, Frontal Lobe, Humans, Male, Mathematics, Phonetics, Temporal Lobe
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Behavioral studies have shown discrepant results regarding the role of phonology in predicting math gains. The objective of this study was to use fMRI to study the role of activation during a rhyming judgment task in predicting behavioral gains on math fluency, multiplication, and subtraction skill. We focused within the left middle/superior temporal gyrus and left inferior frontal gyrus, brain areas associated with the storage of phonological representations and with their access, respectively. We ran multiple regression analyses to determine whether activation predicted gains in the three math measures, separately for younger (i.e. 10 years old) and older (i.e 12 years old) children. Results showed that activation in both temporal and frontal cortex only predicted gains in fluency and multiplication skill, and only for younger children. This study suggests that both temporal and frontal cortex activation during phonological processing are important in predicting gains in math tasks that involve the retrieval of facts that are stored as phonological codes in memory. Moreover, these results were specific to younger children, suggesting that phonology is most important in the early stages of math development. When the math task involved subtractions, which relies on quantity representations, phonological processes were not important in driving gains.
Copyright © 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.
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11 MeSH Terms
Validity of Vocal Communication and Vocal Complexity in Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.
McDaniel J, Yoder P, Estes A, Rogers SJ
(2020) J Autism Dev Disord 50: 224-237
MeSH Terms: Autism Spectrum Disorder, Behavior Rating Scale, Child, Preschool, Communication, Female, Humans, Infant, Language Development, Male
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2020
To identify valid measures of vocal development in young children with autism spectrum disorder in the early stages of language learning, we evaluated the convergent validity, divergent validity, and sensitivity to change (across 12 months) of two measures of vocal communication and two measures of vocal complexity through conventional coding of communication samples. Participants included 87 children with autism spectrum disorder (M = 23.42 months at entry). All four vocal variables demonstrated consistent evidence of convergent validity, divergent validity, and sensitivity to change with large effect sizes for convergent validity and sensitivity to change. The results highlight the value of measuring vocal communication and vocal complexity in future studies.
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9 MeSH Terms
Genomic medicine for undiagnosed diseases.
Wise AL, Manolio TA, Mensah GA, Peterson JF, Roden DM, Tamburro C, Williams MS, Green ED
(2019) Lancet 394: 533-540
MeSH Terms: Adult, Child, Early Diagnosis, Genomics, Humans, Phenotype, Prenatal Diagnosis, Rare Diseases, Sequence Analysis, DNA, Whole Exome Sequencing, Whole Genome Sequencing
Show Abstract · Added March 24, 2020
One of the primary goals of genomic medicine is to improve diagnosis through identification of genomic conditions, which could improve clinical management, prevent complications, and promote health. We explore how genomic medicine is being used to obtain molecular diagnoses for patients with previously undiagnosed diseases in prenatal, paediatric, and adult clinical settings. We focus on the role of clinical genomic sequencing (exome and genome) in aiding patients with conditions that are undiagnosed even after extensive clinical evaluation and testing. In particular, we explore the impact of combining genomic and phenotypic data and integrating multiple data types to improve diagnoses for patients with undiagnosed diseases, and we discuss how these genomic sequencing diagnoses could change clinical management.
Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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Irritability and brain volume in adolescents: cross-sectional and longitudinal associations.
Dennis EL, Humphreys KL, King LS, Thompson PM, Gotlib IH
(2019) Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci 14: 687-698
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Brain, Cerebral Cortex, Child, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Humans, Irritable Mood, Longitudinal Studies, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Stress, Psychological, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Irritability is garnering increasing attention in psychiatric research as a transdiagnostic marker of both internalizing and externalizing disorders. These disorders often emerge during adolescence, highlighting the need to examine changes in the brain and in psychological functioning during this developmental period. Adolescents were recruited for a longitudinal study examining the effects of early life stress on the development of psychopathology. The 151 adolescents (73 M/78 F, average age = 11.5 years, standard deviation = 1.1) were scanned with a T1-weighted MRI sequence and parents completed reports of adolescent irritability using the Affective Reactivity Index. Of these 151 adolescents, 94 (46 M/48 F) returned for a second session (average interval = 1.9 years, SD = 0.4). We used tensor-based morphometry to examine cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between irritability and regional brain volume. Irritability was associated with brain volume across a number of regions. More irritable individuals had larger hippocampi, insula, medial orbitofrontal cortex and cingulum/cingulate cortex and smaller putamen and internal capsule. Across the brain, more irritable individuals also had larger volume and less volume contraction in a number of areas that typically decrease in volume over the developmental period studied here, suggesting delayed maturation. These structural changes may increase adolescents' vulnerability for internalizing and externalizing disorders.
© The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press.
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Effects of surgical targeting in laser interstitial thermal therapy for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy: A multicenter study of 234 patients.
Wu C, Jermakowicz WJ, Chakravorti S, Cajigas I, Sharan AD, Jagid JR, Matias CM, Sperling MR, Buckley R, Ko A, Ojemann JG, Miller JW, Youngerman B, Sheth SA, McKhann GM, Laxton AW, Couture DE, Popli GS, Smith A, Mehta AD, Ho AL, Halpern CH, Englot DJ, Neimat JS, Konrad PE, Neal E, Vale FL, Holloway KL, Air EL, Schwalb J, Dawant BM, D'Haese PF
(2019) Epilepsia 60: 1171-1183
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Amygdala, Child, Cohort Studies, Epilepsy, Temporal Lobe, Epilepsy, Tonic-Clonic, Female, Humans, Laser Therapy, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Retrospective Studies, Seizures, Treatment Outcome, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added June 22, 2019
OBJECTIVE - Laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) has reported seizure freedom rates between 36% and 78% with at least 1 year of follow-up. Unfortunately, the lack of robust methods capable of incorporating the inherent variability of patient anatomy, the variability of the ablated volumes, and clinical outcomes have limited three-dimensional quantitative analysis of surgical targeting and its impact on seizure outcomes. We therefore aimed to leverage a novel image-based methodology for normalizing surgical therapies across a large multicenter cohort to quantify the effects of surgical targeting on seizure outcomes in LITT for mTLE.
METHODS - This multicenter, retrospective cohort study included 234 patients from 11 centers who underwent LITT for mTLE. To investigate therapy location, all ablation cavities were manually traced on postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which were subsequently nonlinearly normalized to a common atlas space. The association of clinical variables and ablation location to seizure outcome was calculated using multivariate regression and Bayesian models, respectively.
RESULTS - Ablations including more anterior, medial, and inferior temporal lobe structures, which involved greater amygdalar volume, were more likely to be associated with Engel class I outcomes. At both 1 and 2 years after LITT, 58.0% achieved Engel I outcomes. A history of bilateral tonic-clonic seizures decreased chances of Engel I outcome. Radiographic hippocampal sclerosis was not associated with seizure outcome.
SIGNIFICANCE - LITT is a viable treatment for mTLE in patients who have been properly evaluated at a comprehensive epilepsy center. Consideration of surgical factors is imperative to the complete assessment of LITT. Based on our model, ablations must prioritize the amygdala and also include the hippocampal head, parahippocampal gyrus, and rhinal cortices to maximize chances of seizure freedom. Extending the ablation posteriorly has diminishing returns. Further work is necessary to refine this analysis and define the minimal zone of ablation necessary for seizure control.
Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2019 International League Against Epilepsy.
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19 MeSH Terms
Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder May Learn from Caregiver Verb Input Better in Certain Engagement States.
Crandall MC, Bottema-Beutel K, McDaniel J, Watson LR, Yoder PJ
(2019) J Autism Dev Disord 49: 3102-3112
MeSH Terms: Autism Spectrum Disorder, Caregivers, Child, Preschool, Female, Humans, Language Development, Male, Verbal Learning, Vocabulary
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2020
The relation between caregiver follow-in utterances with verbs presented in different states of dyadic engagement and later child expressive verb vocabulary in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) was examined in 29 toddlers with ASD and their caregivers. Caregiver verb input in follow-in utterances presented during higher order supported joint engagement (HSJE) accounted for a significant, large amount of variance in later child verb vocabulary; R= .26. This relation remained significant when controlling for early verb vocabulary or verb input in lower support engagement states. Other types of talk in follow-in utterances in HSJE did not correlate with later verb vocabulary. These findings are an important step towards identifying interactional contexts that facilitate verb learning in children with ASD.
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