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Microvascular disease confers additional risk to COVID-19 infection.
Bale BF, Doneen AL, Vigerust DJ
(2020) Med Hypotheses 144: 109999
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aging, COVID-19, Cardiovascular Diseases, Child, Diabetes Mellitus, Disease Susceptibility, Humans, Hydrogen Peroxide, Hypertension, Hypochlorous Acid, Immunity, Innate, Lung, Microcirculation, Microvessels, Neutrophils, Pandemics, Peroxidase, Risk Factors, United States
Show Abstract · Added June 25, 2020
The majority of fatalities thus far in the COVID-19 pandemic have been attributed to pneumonia. As expected, the fatality rate reported in China is higher in people with chronic pulmonary disease (6.3%) and those who have cancer (5.6%). According to the American College of Cardiology Clinical Bulletin "COVID-19 Clinical Guidance for the CV Care Team", there is a significantly higher fatality rate in people who are elderly (8.0% 70-79 years; 14.8% ≥80 years), diabetic (7.3%), hypertensive (6.0%), or have known cardiovascular disease (CVD) (10.5%). We propose a biological reason for the higher mortality risk in these populations that is apparent. We further present a set of pathophysiological reasons for the heightened danger that could lead to therapies for enhanced management and prevention.
Copyright © 2020 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.
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20 MeSH Terms
Population-Based Analysis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Children: Identifying Optimal Surgical Treatment.
Ziogas IA, Ye F, Zhao Z, Matsuoka LK, Montenovo MI, Izzy M, Benedetti DJ, Lovvorn HN, Gillis LA, Alexopoulos SP
(2020) J Am Coll Surg 230: 1035-1044.e3
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Age Factors, Carcinoma, Hepatocellular, Child, Female, Hepatectomy, Humans, Liver Neoplasms, Liver Transplantation, Male, Patient Selection, Prognosis, Retrospective Studies, SEER Program, Survival Rate, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added November 30, 2020
BACKGROUND - Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) constitutes 0.5% of childhood malignancies and exhibits poor prognosis. Complete tumor extirpation either by partial liver resection (LR) or liver transplantation (LT) is the only curative treatment. Due to the poor initial outcomes of LT, LR has remained the mainstay of treatment for all but select children fulfilling the Milan criteria (originally designed for adults).
METHODS - We conducted a retrospective cohort study of pediatric HCC patients (younger than 18 years of age) registered in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database between 2004 and 2015. Survival analysis was performed by means of Kaplan-Meier methods, 2-sided stratified log-rank tests, and Cox regression models.
RESULTS - Of 127 children with HCC, 46 did not undergo operation (36.2%), 32 underwent LT (25.2%), and 49 underwent LR (38.6%). Using the Kaplan-Meier method, the 5-year cancer-specific survival (CSS) rates for LT and LR were 87% and 63%, respectively. LT exhibited superior CSS vs LR (log-rank, p = 0.007). For T1 stage, LT showed equivalent CSS compared with LR (log-rank, p = 0.23), and for T2 and T3 stage, LT exhibited superior CSS (log-rank, p = 0.047 and p = 0.01, respectively). On multivariable Cox regression analysis, T3/T4 stage (adjusted hazard ratio 13.63; 95% CI, 2.9 to 64.07; p = 0.001), and LR (adjusted hazard ratio 7.51; 95% CI, 2.07 to 27.29; p = 0.002) were found to be independently associated with cancer-specific mortality. Fibrolamellar histology and lymph node status were not found to be associated with mortality.
CONCLUSIONS - Our findings suggest that children diagnosed with nonmetastatic advanced-stage HCC have a favorable prognosis after LT compared with LR. Early inclusion of an LT consultation after the initial diagnosis is warranted, especially in children with unresectable HCC or when complete tumor extirpation with LR is not feasible.
Copyright © 2020 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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16 MeSH Terms
Using novel magnetic resonance imaging methods to predict stroke risk in individuals with sickle cell anemia.
Jordan LC, Kassim AA, Wilkerson KL, Lee CA, Waddle SL, Donahue MJ
(2020) Hematol Oncol Stem Cell Ther 13: 76-84
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Anemia, Sickle Cell, Child, Child, Preschool, Female, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Risk, Stroke
Show Abstract · Added March 24, 2020
Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is a well-characterized monogenetic disorder with a high prevalence of cerebral vasculopathy, silent cerebral infarcts, and strokes. A significant mechanism for cerebral infarction in SCA is hemodynamic imbalance. To compensate for reduced oxygen-carrying capacity due to anemia, individuals with SCA have chronically elevated cerebral blood flow to maintain viable oxygen delivery to the brain tissue. Often the oxygen extraction fraction (ratio of oxygen consumed to oxygen delivered) is increased in more severely affected individuals. Subsequently, cerebrovascular reserve capacity, the ability of arterioles to dilate and further increase the cerebral blood volume and flow, will be reduced. These hemodynamic profiles have been associated with prior cerebral infarcts and increased evidence of disease severity. These cerebral hemodynamic parameters can be assessed noninvasively with noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain utilizing specific MRI methods. This review focuses on using advanced neuroimaging methods to assess stroke risk in individuals with SCA, and such methods may be utilized before and after bone marrow or hematopoietic stem cell transplant to assess cerebral hemodynamic response. This manuscript is part of the Proceeding of The European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT) Congress on Sickle Cell Disease, 16th-17 May 2019, Regensburg, Germany.
Copyright © 2020 King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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10 MeSH Terms
Repeatability and Reproducibility of Pancreas Volume Measurements Using MRI.
Williams JM, Hilmes MA, Archer B, Dulaney A, Du L, Kang H, Russell WE, Powers AC, Moore DJ, Virostko J
(2020) Sci Rep 10: 4767
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Child, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1, Female, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Organ Size, Pancreas, Reproducibility of Results, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 19, 2020
Reduced pancreas volume, as measured by non-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), is observed in individuals with newly-diagnosed type 1 diabetes (T1D) and declines over the first year after diagnosis. In this study, we determined the repeatability and inter-reader reproducibility of pancreas volume measurements by MRI. Test-retest scans in individuals with or without T1D (n = 16) had an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of 0.985 (95% CI 0.961 to 0.995) for pancreas volume. Independent pancreas outlines by two board-certified radiologists (n = 30) yielded an ICC of 0.945 (95% CI 0.889 to 0.973). The mean Dice coefficient, a measurement of the degree of overlap between pancreas regions of interest between the two readers, was 0.77. Prandial state did not influence pancreatic measurements, as stomach volume did not correlate with pancreas volume. These data demonstrate that MRI measurements of pancreas volume between two readers are repeatable and reproducible with ICCs that correspond to excellent clinical significance (ICC > 0.9), are not related to changes in stomach volume, and could be a useful tool for clinical investigation of diabetes and other pancreas pathologies.
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12 MeSH Terms
Health disparities among tennessee pediatric renal tumor patients.
Neuzil K, Apple A, Sybenga A, Chen H, Zhao S, Whiteside M, Correa H, Phelps HM, Lovvorn HN
(2020) J Pediatr Surg 55: 1081-1087
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, African Americans, Carcinoma, Renal Cell, Child, Child, Preschool, Cohort Studies, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Healthcare Disparities, Humans, Infant, Kidney Neoplasms, Male, Neoplasm Staging, Registries, Retrospective Studies, Sarcoma, Tennessee, Wilms Tumor
Show Abstract · Added November 30, 2020
BACKGROUND/PURPOSE - Wilms tumor (WT) poses a cancer health disparity to black children globally, which has not been evaluated thoroughly for other pediatric renal cancers. We aimed to characterize health disparities among Tennessee children treated for any renal cancer.
METHODS - The Tennessee Cancer Registry (TCR) was queried for patients ≤18 years having any renal cancer (n = 160). To clarify treatment and outcomes, we performed a retrospective cohort study of pediatric renal cancer patients in our institutional cancer registry (ICR; n = 121). Diagnoses in both registries included WT, Sarcoma/Other, and Renal Cell Carcinoma. Wilcoxon/Pearson, Kaplan-Meier, and logistic regression were completed.
RESULTS - In both registries, WT comprised the most common renal cancer and youngest median age. Sarcoma was intermediate in frequency and age, and RCC was least common, having the oldest age (p < 0.001). In the TCR, black patients comprised 26% of all patients, presented more commonly with distant disease than white patients (37% v. 16%; p = 0.021), and showed worse overall survival (73% v. 89%; p = 0.018), while the ICR showed similar survival between race groups (92% v. 93%, p = 0.868). Sarcoma and metastases were independent predictors of death in both registries (p ≤ 0.002).
CONCLUSIONS - Black children in Tennessee presented with more advanced disease and experienced worse survival when combining all renal cancer types, particularly RCC and Sarcoma. When treated at a comprehensive pediatric cancer center, these survival disparities appear diminished.
TYPE OF STUDY - Prognostic study.
LEVEL OF EVIDENCE - Level II (retrospective cohort).
Copyright © 2020 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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MeSH Terms
Pediatric Acute Stroke Protocol Implementation and Utilization Over 7 Years.
Wharton JD, Barry MM, Lee CA, Massey K, Ladner TR, Jordan LC
(2020) J Pediatr 220: 214-220.e1
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Child, Child, Preschool, Female, Guideline Adherence, Humans, Male, Retrospective Studies, Stroke, Time Factors
Show Abstract · Added March 24, 2020
OBJECTIVE - To examine the implementation and utilization of a pediatric acute stroke protocol over a 7-year period, hypothesizing improvements in protocol implementation and increased protocol use over time.
STUDY DESIGN - Clinical and demographic data for this retrospective observational study from 2011 through 2018 were obtained from a quality improvement database and medical records of children for whom the acute stroke protocol was activated. The initial 43 months of the protocol (period 1) were compared with the subsequent 43 months (period 2).
RESULTS - Over the 7-year period, a total of 385 stroke alerts were activated, in 150 children (39%) in period 1 and 235 (61%) in period 2, representing a 56% increase in protocol activation. Stroke was the final diagnosis in 80 children overall (21%), including 38 (25%) in period 1 and 42 (19%) in period 2 (P = .078). The combined frequency of diagnosed stroke, transient ischemic attack (TIA), and other neurologic emergencies remained stable across the 2 time periods at 39% and 37%, respectively (P = .745). Pediatric National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (PedNIHSS) documentation increased from 42% in period 1 to 82% in period 2 (P < .001). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was the first neuroimaging study for 68% of the children in period 1 vs 78% in period 2 (P = .038). All children with acute stroke received immediate supportive care.
CONCLUSIONS - Pediatric stroke protocol implementation improved over time with increased use of the PedNIHSS and use of MRI as the first imaging study. However, with increased utilization, the frequency of confirmed strokes and other neurologic emergencies remained stable. The frequency of stroke and other neurologic emergencies in these children affirms the importance of implementing and maintaining a pediatric acute stroke protocol.
Copyright © 2020 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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10 MeSH Terms
Maternal microbial molecules affect offspring health.
Ferguson J
(2020) Science 367: 978-979
MeSH Terms: Animals, Child, Child Health, Diet, High-Fat, Female, Gastrointestinal Microbiome, Mice, Obesity, Phenotype, Pregnancy
Added March 3, 2020
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10 MeSH Terms
Correlates of Cognitive Function in Sickle Cell Disease: A Meta-Analysis.
Prussien KV, Siciliano RE, Ciriegio AE, Anderson AS, Sathanayagam R, DeBaun MR, Jordan LC, Compas BE
(2020) J Pediatr Psychol 45: 145-155
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Anemia, Sickle Cell, Brain, Child, Cognition, Executive Function, Female, Humans, Male, Problem Solving, Ultrasonography, Doppler, Transcranial
Show Abstract · Added March 24, 2020
OBJECTIVE - To provide a comprehensive quantitative review of biological, environmental, and behavioral correlates across domains of cognitive function in sickle cell disease (SCD).
METHODS - Forty-seven studies were identified in PubMed, MedLine, and PsycINFO involving 2573 participants with SCD.
RESULTS - Meta-analytic findings across all identified samples indicate that hemoglobin and hematocrit were positively correlated with Full Scale IQ [FSIQ; r = .15, 95% confidence interval (CI) = .10 to .21], language and verbal reasoning (r = .18, 95% CI = .11 to .24), and executive function (r = .10, 95% CI = .01 to .19) with small effects and significant heterogeneity. Transcranial Doppler velocity was negatively associated with visual spatial and perceptual reasoning (r = -.18, 95% CI = -.31 to -.05). Socioeconomic status was positively associated with FSIQ (r = .23, 95% CI = .17 to .28), language and verbal reasoning (r = .28, 95% CI = .09 to .45), visual spatial and perceptual reasoning (r = .26, 95% CI = .09 to .41), and executive function (r = .18, 95% CI = .07 to .28) with small to medium effects. Finally, total behavioral problems were negatively associated with FSIQ (r = -.12, 95% CI = -.21 to -.02) such that participants with lower FSIQ exhibited greater behavioral and emotional problems.
CONCLUSIONS - Findings provide evidence for biological, environmental, and psychosocial corelates across multiple domains of cognitive function in SCD. More research on more specific cognitive domains and psychosocial correlates is needed in addition to assessments of interactional models among risk factors.
© The Author(s) 2020. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
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12 MeSH Terms
Remote Microphone System Use in the Homes of Children With Hearing Loss: Impact on Caregiver Communication and Child Vocalizations.
Thompson EC, Benítez-Barrera CR, Angley GP, Woynaroski T, Tharpe AM
(2020) J Speech Lang Hear Res 63: 633-642
MeSH Terms: Caregivers, Child, Child Language, Child, Preschool, Communication, Communication Aids for Disabled, Female, Hearing Loss, Sensorineural, Humans, Male, Treatment Outcome, Verbal Behavior
Show Abstract · Added March 18, 2020
Purpose This study examined the impact of home use of remote microphone systems (RMSs) on caregiver communication and child vocalizations in families of children with hearing loss. Method We drew on data from a prior study in which Language ENvironmental Analysis recorders were used with 9 families during 2 consecutive weekends-1 that involved using an RMS and 1 that did not. Audio samples from Language ENvironmental Analysis recorders were (a) manually coded to quantify the frequency of verbal repetitions and alert phrases caregivers utilized in communicating to children with hearing loss and (b) automatically analyzed to quantify children's vocalization rate, duration, complexity, and reciprocity when using and not using an RMS. Results When using an RMS at home, caregivers did not repeat or clarify their statements as often as when not using an RMS while communicating with their children with hearing loss. However, no between-condition differences were observed in children's vocal characteristics. Conclusions Results provide further support for home RMS use for children with hearing loss. Specifically, findings lend empirical support to prior parental reports suggesting that RMS use eases caregiver communication in the home setting. Studies exploring RMS use over a longer duration of time might provide further insight into potential long-term effects on children's vocal production.
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12 MeSH Terms
Correlating maternal iodine status with neonatal thyroid function in two hospital populations in Ghana: a multicenter cross-sectional pilot study.
Dei-Tutu SA, Manful A, Heimburger DC, Malechi H, Moore DJ, Oppong SA, Russell WE, Aliyu MH
(2020) BMC Pediatr 20: 26
MeSH Terms: Child, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Ghana, Hospitals, Humans, Infant, Newborn, Iodine, Pilot Projects, Thyroid Gland, Thyrotropin
Show Abstract · Added January 23, 2020
BACKGROUND - Congenital hypothyroidism is a common, yet easily treatable cause of poor growth and intellectual disability. Newborn screening programs play an important role in the early detection and treatment of congenital hypothyroidism. However, an estimated 71% of children are born in countries such as Ghana, which does not have a screening program. Iodine deficiency, a common cause of congenital hypothyroidism, is present in the Ghanaian population. Mild to moderate maternal iodine deficiency may negatively impact cognitive function in children. A structured approach to examine the association between maternal iodine levels and infant thyroid function may have important ramifications on our understanding of congenital hypothyroidism in Ghana. We investigated the hypothesis that maternal iodine deficiency impacts infant thyroid function, using Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) as a marker of thyroid function. We also explored potential opportunities and barriers to newborn screening for congenital hypothyroidism in Ghana.
METHODS - This was a cross-sectional, multicenter pilot study of 250 women and their neonates recruited from post-natal clinics in Accra and Tamale, Ghana. We compared maternal urine iodine concentration and infant TSH, as well as maternal sociodemographic and nutrition information. Regression models were used to model the relationship between variables.
RESULTS - Median infant TSH was 4.7 μIU/ml (95% CI: 3.9-5.5) in Accra. In Tamale, the median infant TSH was 3.5 μIU/ml (95%CI: 3.3 to 3.6) (Δ: 1.3 μIU/ml, 95% CI: 0.5-2.1, p = 0.002). Median maternal urine iodine concentrations were 141.0 μg/L (95% CI: 115.7 to 166.3) and 142.5 μg/L (95% CI: 125.1 to 160.0) in Accra and Tamale, respectively (Δ: - 1.5 μIU/ml, 95% CI: - 32.2 - 29.2, p = 0.925). There was a weakly positive correlation between maternal urine iodine and infant TSH (rho 0.1, p = 0.02). Almost one-third (30%) of women in both locations had biochemical evidence of iodine deficiency. Mothers with any formal education were more likely to have higher iodine levels than their counterparts who had no formal education (coefficient 0.31, p = 0.006).
CONCLUSIONS - Maternal iodine deficiency is prevalent in Ghana and is correlated to infant thyroid function. We recommend studies with larger sample sizes to assess the true scope of this relationship.
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11 MeSH Terms