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Pancreas Volume Declines During the First Year After Diagnosis of Type 1 Diabetes and Exhibits Altered Diffusion at Disease Onset.
Virostko J, Williams J, Hilmes M, Bowman C, Wright JJ, Du L, Kang H, Russell WE, Powers AC, Moore DJ
(2019) Diabetes Care 42: 248-257
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Atrophy, Autoantibodies, Case-Control Studies, Child, Child, Preschool, Cohort Studies, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1, Female, Glucose Tolerance Test, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Organ Size, Pancreas, Time Factors, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added December 18, 2018
OBJECTIVE - This study investigated the temporal dynamics of pancreas volume and microstructure in children and adolescents with recent-onset type 1 diabetes (T1D) and individuals without diabetes, including a subset expressing autoantibodies associated with the early stages of T1D.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - MRI was performed in individuals with recent-onset stage 3 T1D ( = 51; median age 13 years) within 100 days after diagnosis (mean 67 days), 6 months, and 1 year postdiagnosis. Longitudinal MRI measurements were also made in similarly aged control participants ( = 57) and in autoantibody-positive individuals without diabetes ( = 20). The MRI protocol consisted of anatomical imaging to determine pancreas volume and quantitative MRI protocols interrogating tissue microstructure and composition.
RESULTS - Within 100 days of diabetes onset, individuals with T1D had a smaller pancreas (median volume 28.6 mL) than control participants (median volume 48.4 mL; < 0.001), including when normalized by individual weight ( < 0.001). Longitudinal measurements of pancreas volume increased in control participants over the year, consistent with adolescent growth, but pancreas volume declined over the first year after T1D diagnosis ( < 0.001). In multiple autoantibody-positive individuals, the pancreas volume was significantly larger than that of the T1D cohort ( = 0.017) but smaller than that of the control cohort ( = 0.04). Diffusion-weighted MRI showed that individuals with recent-onset T1D had a higher apparent diffusion coefficient ( = 0.012), suggesting a loss of cellular structural integrity, with heterogeneous pancreatic distribution.
CONCLUSIONS - These results indicate that pancreas volume is decreased in stages 1, 2, and 3 of T1D and decreases during the first year after diabetes onset and that this loss of pancreatic volume is accompanied by microstructural changes.
© 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.
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19 MeSH Terms
Neurological symptoms in Hypophosphatasia.
Colazo JM, Hu JR, Dahir KM, Simmons JH
(2019) Osteoporos Int 30: 469-480
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Alkaline Phosphatase, Child, Child, Preschool, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Humans, Hypophosphatasia, Male, Mental Disorders, Middle Aged, Nervous System Diseases, Prevalence, Retrospective Studies, United States, Vitamin B 6, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2019
Hypophosphatasia (HPP) typically manifests with fractures, tooth loss, and muscle pain. Although mental health diagnoses and neurological symptoms have not been previously well documented in HPP, they occur commonly. The recognition of non-traditional symptoms may improve patient satisfaction, preempt costly evaluation and misdiagnosis, and lead to further treatment options.
INTRODUCTION - Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is an inborn error of metabolism due to deficiency of tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNSALP). It is traditionally characterized by rickets in children and osteomalacia in adults, along with fractures, tooth loss, and muscle pain. Neurological symptoms and mental health diagnoses have not been widely reported, and we therefore report their prevalence in a cohort of patients with HPP.
METHODS - A retrospective chart review was performed on a series of 82 HPP patients. Patient charts were reviewed to identify the possible presence and onset of 13 common neurological symptoms.
RESULTS - Median age was 36 years (2 to 79). Seventeen had adult onset HPP (> 18 years) and 65 had pediatric onset HPP (< 18 years). Median time from symptom onset to HPP diagnosis was 8 years (0 to 67). Seventy-four percent had a family history of bone disease, while 17% had a family history of neurologic disease. Bone problems occurred in 89%, dental problems in 77%, and muscle problems in 66%. Fatigue occurred in 66%, headache in 61%, sleep disturbance in 51%, gait change in 44%, vertigo in 43%, depression in 39%, anxiety in 35%, neuropathy in 35%, and hearing loss in 33%.
CONCLUSIONS - The extra-skeletal manifestations of HPP, specifically neurological symptoms, have not been previously well documented. However, mental health diagnoses and neurological symptoms such as headache and sleep disturbance occur commonly in patients with HPP. The recognition of non-traditional symptoms in HPP may improve patient satisfaction, preempt costly evaluation and misdiagnosis, and may lead to further treatment options.
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1 Members
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19 MeSH Terms
Associations among histological characteristics and patient outcomes in colorectal carcinoma with a mucinous component.
Gonzalez RS, Cates JMM, Washington K
(2019) Histopathology 74: 406-414
MeSH Terms: Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous, Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Child, Colorectal Neoplasms, Female, Humans, Kaplan-Meier Estimate, Male, Middle Aged, Proportional Hazards Models, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added November 1, 2018
AIMS - Colorectal carcinoma (CRC) often has a mucinous component, with more than 50% mucin by volume defining the mucinous subtype of CRC. The prognostic impact of the mucinous phenotype remains unclear.
METHODS AND RESULTS - We evaluated 224 CRC with at least 5% mucinous component (herein 'mCRC') for patient sex, age, race and outcome; tumour size, location, stage and microsatellite instability (MSI) status; percentage of glands producing mucin; percentage of tumour volume composed of mucin; whether tumoral epithelium floated in mucin pools; tumour budding; signet ring cells (SRCs); and peritumoural inflammation (PI). We related these features to disease-specific survival and compared outcomes to 499 stage-matched, conventional colorectal adenocarcinomas. Factors predicting worse prognosis in mCRC on univariable analysis included non-MSI-high status (P = 0.0008), SRC (P = 0.0017) and lack of PI (P = 0.0034). No parameters were independently associated with outcome after adjusting for tumour stage in multivariate analysis. The percentage of glands producing mucin and percentage tumour volume composed of mucin did not affect prognosis, including at the recommended 50% cut-off for subtyping mCRC. Disease-specific survival for mCRC and adenocarcinomas were similar after accounting for stage.
CONCLUSIONS - Stage-matched mCRCs and adenocarcinomas have similar outcomes, with no prognostic significance to morphological subtyping. Histological characteristics of mCRC, including percentage of tumour volume comprised of mucin, were not predictive of outcome.
© 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
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14 MeSH Terms
Molecular and epidemiologic characterization of Wilms tumor from Baghdad, Iraq.
Phelps HM, Al-Jadiry MF, Corbitt NM, Pierce JM, Li B, Wei Q, Flores RR, Correa H, Uccini S, Frangoul H, Alsaadawi AR, Al-Badri SAF, Al-Darraji AF, Al-Saeed RM, Al-Hadad SA, Lovvorn Iii HN
(2018) World J Pediatr 14: 585-593
MeSH Terms: Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing, Child, Preschool, DNA Topoisomerases, Type II, Female, Homeodomain Proteins, Humans, Immunohistochemistry, Infant, Insulin-Like Growth Factor II, Iraq, Kidney Neoplasms, Male, Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction, Mutation, N-Myc Proto-Oncogene Protein, Nerve Tissue Proteins, Neural Cell Adhesion Molecules, Nuclear Proteins, Poly-ADP-Ribose Binding Proteins, Receptors, Retinoic Acid, Sequence Analysis, DNA, Transcription Factors, Tumor Suppressor Protein p53, Tumor Suppressor Proteins, WT1 Proteins, Wilms Tumor, beta Catenin
Show Abstract · Added January 28, 2019
BACKGROUND - Wilms tumor (WT) is the most common childhood kidney cancer worldwide, yet its incidence and clinical behavior vary according to race and access to adequate healthcare resources. To guide and streamline therapy in the war-torn and resource-constrained city of Baghdad, Iraq, we conducted a first-ever molecular analysis of 20 WT specimens to characterize the biological features of this lethal disease within this challenged population.
METHODS - Next-generation sequencing of ten target genes associated with WT development and treatment resistance (WT1, CTNNB1, WTX, IGF2, CITED1, SIX2, p53, N-MYC, CRABP2, and TOP2A) was completed. Immunohistochemistry was performed for 6 marker proteins of WT (WT1, CTNNB1, NCAM, CITED1, SIX2, and p53). Patient outcomes were compiled.
RESULTS - Mutations were detected in previously described WT "hot spots" (e.g., WT1 and CTNNB1) as well as novel loci that may be unique to the Iraqi population. Immunohistochemistry showed expression domains most typical of blastemal-predominant WT. Remarkably, despite the challenges facing families and care providers, only one child, with combined WT1 and CTNNB1 mutations, was confirmed dead from disease. Median clinical follow-up was 40.5 months (range 6-78 months).
CONCLUSIONS - These data suggest that WT biology within a population of Iraqi children manifests features both similar to and unique from disease variants in other regions of the world. These observations will help to risk stratify WT patients living in this difficult environment to more or less intensive therapies and to focus treatment on cell-specific targets.
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27 MeSH Terms
Identical and Nonidentical Twins: Risk and Factors Involved in Development of Islet Autoimmunity and Type 1 Diabetes.
Triolo TM, Fouts A, Pyle L, Yu L, Gottlieb PA, Steck AK, Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet Study Group
(2019) Diabetes Care 42: 192-199
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Autoantibodies, Autoimmunity, Child, Child, Preschool, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1, Disease Progression, Diseases in Twins, Environment, Female, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Glutamate Decarboxylase, Humans, Insulin, Islets of Langerhans, Male, Mass Screening, Risk Factors, Seroepidemiologic Studies, Siblings, Twins, Twins, Dizygotic, Twins, Monozygotic, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added August 15, 2018
OBJECTIVE - There are variable reports of risk of concordance for progression to islet autoantibodies and type 1 diabetes in identical twins after one twin is diagnosed. We examined development of positive autoantibodies and type 1 diabetes and the effects of genetic factors and common environment on autoantibody positivity in identical twins, nonidentical twins, and full siblings.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - Subjects from the TrialNet Pathway to Prevention Study ( = 48,026) were screened from 2004 to 2015 for islet autoantibodies (GAD antibody [GADA], insulinoma-associated antigen 2 [IA-2A], and autoantibodies against insulin [IAA]). Of these subjects, 17,226 (157 identical twins, 283 nonidentical twins, and 16,786 full siblings) were followed for autoantibody positivity or type 1 diabetes for a median of 2.1 years.
RESULTS - At screening, identical twins were more likely to have positive GADA, IA-2A, and IAA than nonidentical twins or full siblings (all < 0.0001). Younger age, male sex, and genetic factors were significant factors for expression of IA-2A, IAA, one or more positive autoantibodies, and two or more positive autoantibodies (all ≤ 0.03). Initially autoantibody-positive identical twins had a 69% risk of diabetes by 3 years compared with 1.5% for initially autoantibody-negative identical twins. In nonidentical twins, type 1 diabetes risk by 3 years was 72% for initially multiple autoantibody-positive, 13% for single autoantibody-positive, and 0% for initially autoantibody-negative nonidentical twins. Full siblings had a 3-year type 1 diabetes risk of 47% for multiple autoantibody-positive, 12% for single autoantibody-positive, and 0.5% for initially autoantibody-negative subjects.
CONCLUSIONS - Risk of type 1 diabetes at 3 years is high for initially multiple and single autoantibody-positive identical twins and multiple autoantibody-positive nonidentical twins. Genetic predisposition, age, and male sex are significant risk factors for development of positive autoantibodies in twins.
© 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.
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25 MeSH Terms
Low-Dose Anti-Thymocyte Globulin (ATG) Preserves β-Cell Function and Improves HbA in New-Onset Type 1 Diabetes.
Haller MJ, Schatz DA, Skyler JS, Krischer JP, Bundy BN, Miller JL, Atkinson MA, Becker DJ, Baidal D, DiMeglio LA, Gitelman SE, Goland R, Gottlieb PA, Herold KC, Marks JB, Moran A, Rodriguez H, Russell W, Wilson DM, Greenbaum CJ, Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet ATG-GCSF Study Group
(2018) Diabetes Care 41: 1917-1925
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Antilymphocyte Serum, C-Peptide, Child, Cytoprotection, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Double-Blind Method, Drug Therapy, Combination, Female, Glycated Hemoglobin A, Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor, Humans, Insulin-Secreting Cells, Male, Pilot Projects, Polyethylene Glycols, Recombinant Proteins, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added May 2, 2019
OBJECTIVE - A pilot study suggested that combination therapy with low-dose anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) and pegylated granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF) preserves C-peptide in established type 1 diabetes (T1D) (duration 4 months to 2 years). We hypothesized that ) low-dose ATG/GCSF or ) low-dose ATG alone would slow the decline of β-cell function in patients with new-onset T1D (duration <100 days).
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - A three-arm, randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled trial was performed by the Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet Study Group in 89 subjects: 29 subjects randomized to ATG (2.5 mg/kg intravenously) followed by pegylated GCSF (6 mg subcutaneously every 2 weeks for 6 doses), 29 to ATG alone (2.5 mg/kg), and 31 to placebo. The primary end point was mean area under the curve (AUC) C-peptide during a 2-h mixed-meal tolerance test 1 year after initiation of therapy. Significance was defined as one-sided value < 0.025.
RESULTS - The 1-year mean AUC C-peptide was significantly higher in subjects treated with ATG (0.646 nmol/L) versus placebo (0.406 nmol/L) ( = 0.0003) but not in those treated with ATG/GCSF (0.528 nmol/L) versus placebo ( = 0.031). HbA was significantly reduced at 1 year in subjects treated with ATG and ATG/GCSF, = 0.002 and 0.011, respectively.
CONCLUSIONS - Low-dose ATG slowed decline of C-peptide and reduced HbA in new-onset T1D. Addition of GCSF did not enhance C-peptide preservation afforded by low-dose ATG. Future studies should be considered to determine whether low-dose ATG alone or in combination with other agents may prevent or delay the onset of the disease.
© 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.
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MeSH Terms
A Type 1 Diabetes Genetic Risk Score Predicts Progression of Islet Autoimmunity and Development of Type 1 Diabetes in Individuals at Risk.
Redondo MJ, Geyer S, Steck AK, Sharp S, Wentworth JM, Weedon MN, Antinozzi P, Sosenko J, Atkinson M, Pugliese A, Oram RA, Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet Study Group
(2018) Diabetes Care 41: 1887-1894
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Autoantibodies, Autoimmunity, Child, Child, Preschool, Diabetes Complications, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1, Disease Progression, Female, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genotype, HLA-DQ Antigens, Humans, Infant, Islets of Langerhans, Male, Middle Aged, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Prognosis, Risk Factors, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added July 23, 2018
OBJECTIVE - We tested the ability of a type 1 diabetes (T1D) genetic risk score (GRS) to predict progression of islet autoimmunity and T1D in at-risk individuals.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - We studied the 1,244 TrialNet Pathway to Prevention study participants (T1D patients' relatives without diabetes and with one or more positive autoantibodies) who were genotyped with Illumina ImmunoChip (median [range] age at initial autoantibody determination 11.1 years [1.2-51.8], 48% male, 80.5% non-Hispanic white, median follow-up 5.4 years). Of 291 participants with a single positive autoantibody at screening, 157 converted to multiple autoantibody positivity and 55 developed diabetes. Of 953 participants with multiple positive autoantibodies at screening, 419 developed diabetes. We calculated the T1D GRS from 30 T1D-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms. We used multivariable Cox regression models, time-dependent receiver operating characteristic curves, and area under the curve (AUC) measures to evaluate prognostic utility of T1D GRS, age, sex, Diabetes Prevention Trial-Type 1 (DPT-1) Risk Score, positive autoantibody number or type, HLA DR3/DR4-DQ8 status, and race/ethnicity. We used recursive partitioning analyses to identify cut points in continuous variables.
RESULTS - Higher T1D GRS significantly increased the rate of progression to T1D adjusting for DPT-1 Risk Score, age, number of positive autoantibodies, sex, and ethnicity (hazard ratio [HR] 1.29 for a 0.05 increase, 95% CI 1.06-1.6; = 0.011). Progression to T1D was best predicted by a combined model with GRS, number of positive autoantibodies, DPT-1 Risk Score, and age (7-year time-integrated AUC = 0.79, 5-year AUC = 0.73). Higher GRS was significantly associated with increased progression rate from single to multiple positive autoantibodies after adjusting for age, autoantibody type, ethnicity, and sex (HR 2.27 for GRS >0.295, 95% CI 1.47-3.51; = 0.0002).
CONCLUSIONS - The T1D GRS independently predicts progression to T1D and improves prediction along T1D stages in autoantibody-positive relatives.
© 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.
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22 MeSH Terms
Improving the value of care for appendectomy through an individual surgeon-specific approach.
Robinson JR, Carter NH, Gibson C, Brinkman AS, Van Arendonk K, Speck KE, Danko ME, Jackson GP, Lovvorn HN, Blakely ML
(2018) J Pediatr Surg 53: 1181-1186
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Appendectomy, Appendicitis, Child, Child, Preschool, Cost-Benefit Analysis, Female, Hospital Costs, Humans, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Laparoscopy, Male, Operating Rooms, Prospective Studies, Quality of Health Care, Surgeons, Tennessee, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added June 27, 2018
PURPOSE - Standardized care via a unified surgeon preference card for pediatric appendectomy can result in significant cost reduction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of cost and outcome feedback to surgeons on value of care in an environment reluctant to adopt a standardized surgeon preference card.
METHODS - Prospective observational study comparing operating room (OR) supply costs and patient outcomes for appendectomy in children with 6-month observation periods both before and after intervention. The intervention was real-time feedback of OR supply cost data to individual surgeons via automated dashboards and monthly reports.
RESULTS - Two hundred sixteen children underwent laparoscopic appendectomy for non-perforated appendicitis (110 pre-intervention and 106 post-intervention). Median supply cost significantly decreased after intervention: $884 (IQR $705-$1025) to $388 (IQR $182-$776), p<0.001. No significant change was detected in median OR duration (47min [IQR 36-63] to 50min [IQR 38-64], p=0.520) or adverse events (1 [0.9%] to 6 [4.7%], p=0.062). OR supply costs for individual surgeons significantly decreased during the intervention period for 6 of 8 surgeons (87.5%).
CONCLUSION - Approaching value measurement with a surgeon-specific (rather than group-wide) approach can reduce OR supply costs while maintaining excellent clinical outcomes.
LEVEL OF EVIDENCE - Level II.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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19 MeSH Terms
Diabetes-specific family conflict: Informant discrepancies and the impact of parental factors.
Savin KL, Hamburger ER, Monzon AD, Patel NJ, Perez KM, Lord JH, Jaser SS
(2018) J Fam Psychol 32: 157-163
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Clinical Trials as Topic, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1, Family Conflict, Female, Humans, Male, Parent-Child Relations, Quality of Life, Risk Factors, Self-Management
Show Abstract · Added May 15, 2018
Family conflict in adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D) has been linked to worse disease management (i.e., glycemic control, adherence to treatment regimen) and reduced quality of life. We sought to examine parental risk factors associated with increased levels of diabetes-specific family conflict and to investigate the discrepancies between parent and adolescent reports of conflict. Adolescents with T1D and their parents (N = 120 dyads) completed measures of diabetes-specific family conflict. Adolescents also reported on health-related quality of life, and parents reported on demographic information. Clinical data were obtained from adolescents' medical records. Adolescents reported significantly greater levels of conflict than their parents around direct diabetes management tasks (e.g., checking blood sugars) and indirect management tasks (e.g., carrying supplies for high or low blood sugars). Several demographic factors were associated with family conflict, including parental education, marital status, and household income. Discrepancies between parent and adolescent reports of family conflict were significantly associated with diabetes-related outcomes. Specifically, higher quality of life was related to discrepancies between parent and adolescent reports of conflict around indirect management tasks. In addition, poorer glycemic control was related to discrepancies between parent and adolescent reports of family conflict around direct diabetes management tasks. These results support obtaining both the adolescent and parent report of conflict for unique information regarding family functioning. (PsycINFO Database Record
(c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).
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12 MeSH Terms
α Cell Function and Gene Expression Are Compromised in Type 1 Diabetes.
Brissova M, Haliyur R, Saunders D, Shrestha S, Dai C, Blodgett DM, Bottino R, Campbell-Thompson M, Aramandla R, Poffenberger G, Lindner J, Pan FC, von Herrath MG, Greiner DL, Shultz LD, Sanyoura M, Philipson LH, Atkinson M, Harlan DM, Levy SE, Prasad N, Stein R, Powers AC
(2018) Cell Rep 22: 2667-2676
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Animals, Case-Control Studies, Cellular Reprogramming, Child, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1, Female, Gene Expression Regulation, Glucagon, Glucagon-Secreting Cells, Humans, Insulin Secretion, Insulin-Secreting Cells, Male, Mice, Middle Aged, Phenotype, Tissue Donors, Transcription Factors, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 8, 2018
Many patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) have residual β cells producing small amounts of C-peptide long after disease onset but develop an inadequate glucagon response to hypoglycemia following T1D diagnosis. The features of these residual β cells and α cells in the islet endocrine compartment are largely unknown, due to the difficulty of comprehensive investigation. By studying the T1D pancreas and isolated islets, we show that remnant β cells appeared to maintain several aspects of regulated insulin secretion. However, the function of T1D α cells was markedly reduced, and these cells had alterations in transcription factors constituting α and β cell identity. In the native pancreas and after placing the T1D islets into a non-autoimmune, normoglycemic in vivo environment, there was no evidence of α-to-β cell conversion. These results suggest an explanation for the disordered T1D counterregulatory glucagon response to hypoglycemia.
Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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21 MeSH Terms