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Exosome secretion promotes chemotaxis of cancer cells.
Sung BH, Weaver AM
(2017) Cell Adh Migr 11: 187-195
MeSH Terms: Cell Line, Tumor, Chemotaxis, Exosomes, Fibronectins, Humans, Models, Biological, Neoplasms
Show Abstract · Added April 26, 2017
Migration of cells toward chemical cues, or chemotaxis, is important for many biologic processes such as immune defense, wound healing and cancer metastasis. Although chemotaxis is thought to occur in cancer cells, it is less well characterized than chemotaxis of professional immune cells such as neutrophils. Here, we show that cancer cell chemotaxis relies on secretion of exosome-type extracellular vesicles. Migration of fibrosarcoma cells toward a gradient of exosome-depleted serum was diminished by knockdown of the exosome secretion regulator Rab27a. Rescue experiments in which chemotaxis chambers were coated with purified extracellular vesicles demonstrate that exosomes but not microvesicles affect both speed and directionality of migrating cells. Chamber coating with purified fibronectin and fibronectin-depleted exosomes demonstrates that the exosome cargo fibronectin promotes cell speed but cannot account for the role of exosomes in promoting directionality of fibrosarcoma cell movement during chemotaxis. These experiments indicate that exosomes contain multiple motility-promoting cargoes that contribute to different aspects of cell motility.
0 Communities
1 Members
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7 MeSH Terms
The role of MyD88- and TRIF-dependent signaling in monophosphoryl lipid A-induced expansion and recruitment of innate immunocytes.
Hernandez A, Bohannon JK, Luan L, Fensterheim BA, Guo Y, Patil NK, McAdams C, Wang J, Sherwood ER
(2016) J Leukoc Biol 100: 1311-1322
MeSH Terms: Adaptor Proteins, Vesicular Transport, Animals, CD11b Antigen, Chemokine CXCL1, Chemokine CXCL2, Chemotaxis, Leukocyte, Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor, Immunity, Innate, L-Selectin, Lipid A, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Monocytes, Myeloid Differentiation Factor 88, Myelopoiesis, Neutrophils, Receptors, Interleukin-8B, Signal Transduction, Toll-Like Receptor 4
Show Abstract · Added December 13, 2016
Treatment with the TLR4 agonist MPLA augments innate resistance to common bacterial pathogens. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which MPLA augments innate immunocyte functions are not well characterized. This study examined the importance of MyD88- and TRIF-dependent signaling for leukocyte mobilization, recruitment, and activation following administration of MPLA. MPLA potently induced MyD88- and TRIF-dependent signaling. A single injection of MPLA caused rapid mobilization and recruitment of neutrophils, a response that was largely mediated by the chemokines CXCL1 and -2 and the hemopoietic factor G-CSF. Rapid neutrophil recruitment and chemokine production were regulated by both pathways although the MyD88-dependent pathway showed some predominance. In further studies, multiple injections of MPLA potently induced mobilization and recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes. Neutrophil recruitment after multiple injections of MPLA was reliant on MyD88-dependent signaling, but effective monocyte recruitment required activation of both pathways. MPLA treatment induced expansion of myeloid progenitors in bone marrow and upregulation of CD11b and shedding of L-selectin by neutrophils, all of which were attenuated in MyD88- and TRIF-deficient mice. These results show that MPLA-induced neutrophil and monocyte recruitment, expansion of bone marrow progenitors and augmentation of neutrophil adhesion molecule expression are regulated by both the MyD88- and TRIF-dependent pathways.
© Society for Leukocyte Biology.
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1 Members
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21 MeSH Terms
Study of Chemotaxis and Cell-Cell Interactions in Cancer with Microfluidic Devices.
Sai J, Rogers M, Hockemeyer K, Wikswo JP, Richmond A
(2016) Methods Enzymol 570: 19-45
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Communication, Cell Movement, Cells, Cultured, Chemokines, Chemotaxis, Equipment Design, HL-60 Cells, Humans, Lab-On-A-Chip Devices, Microfluidic Analytical Techniques, Microfluidics, Neoplasms, Tumor Microenvironment
Show Abstract · Added January 4, 2017
Microfluidic devices have very broad applications in biological assays from simple chemotaxis assays to much more complicated 3D bioreactors. In this chapter, we describe the design and methods for performing chemotaxis assays using simple microfluidic chemotaxis chambers. With these devices, using real-time video microscopy we can examine the chemotactic responses of neutrophil-like cells under conditions of varying gradient steepness or flow rate and then utilize software programs to calculate the speed and angles of cell migration as gradient steepness and flow are varied. Considering the shearing force generated on the cells by the constant flow that is required to produce and maintain a stable gradient, the trajectories of the cell migration will reflect the net result of both shear force generated by flow and the chemotactic force resulting from the chemokine gradient. Moreover, the effects of mutations in chemokine receptors or the presence of inhibitors of intracellular signals required for gradient sensing can be evaluated in real time. We also describe a method to monitor intracellular signals required for cells to alter cell polarity in response to an abrupt switch in gradient direction. Lastly, we demonstrate an in vitro method for studying the interactions of human cancer cells with human endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and leukocytes, as well as environmental chemokines and cytokines, using 3D microbioreactors that mimic the in vivo microenvironment.
© 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
2 Communities
1 Members
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14 MeSH Terms
The homing receptor CD44 is involved in the progression of precancerous gastric lesions in patients infected with Helicobacter pylori and in development of mucous metaplasia in mice.
Garay J, Piazuelo MB, Majumdar S, Li L, Trillo-Tinoco J, Del Valle L, Schneider BG, Delgado AG, Wilson KT, Correa P, Zabaleta J
(2016) Cancer Lett 371: 90-8
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antigens, Ly, Cells, Cultured, Chemotaxis, Leukocyte, Disease Models, Animal, Disease Progression, Female, Gastric Mucosa, Gastritis, Atrophic, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Humans, Hyaluronan Receptors, Interferon-gamma, Macrophages, Peritoneal, Mice, Knockout, Neutrophil Infiltration, Neutrophils, Precancerous Conditions, Signal Transduction, Stomach Neoplasms, Time Factors
Show Abstract · Added February 15, 2016
Infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) leads to inflammatory events that can promote gastric cancer development. Immune cells transition from the circulation into the infected mucosa through the interaction of their receptors and ligands in the endothelial compartment. CD44 expression is increased in advanced gastric lesions. However, the association of this molecule with the progression of these lesions over time has not been investigated. In addition, there is a lack of understanding of the CD44-dependent cellular processes that lead to gastritis, and possibly to gastric cancer. Here we studied H. pylori-positive subjects with gastric lesions that ranged from multifocal atrophic gastritis to dysplasia to determine gene expression changes associated with disease progression over a period of 6 years. We report that CD44 expression is significantly increased in individuals whose gastric lesions progressed along the gastric precancerous cascade. We also show that CD44-/- mice develop less severe and less extensive H. pylori-induced metaplasia, and show fewer infiltrating Gr1+ cells compared to wild type mice. We present data suggesting that CD44 is associated with disease progression. Mechanisms associated with these effects include induction of interferon gamma responses.
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
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22 MeSH Terms
Differential role of an NF-κB transcriptional response element in endothelial versus intimal cell VCAM-1 expression.
Milstone DS, Ilyama M, Chen M, O'Donnell P, Davis VM, Plutzky J, Brown JD, Haldar SM, Siu A, Lau AC, Zhu SN, Basheer MF, Collins T, Jongstra-Bilen J, Cybulsky MI
(2015) Circ Res 117: 166-77
MeSH Terms: 5' Untranslated Regions, Animals, Atherosclerosis, Carotid Artery Injuries, Cells, Cultured, Chemotaxis, Leukocyte, Cholesterol, Dietary, E-Selectin, Endothelial Cells, Endothelium, Vascular, Humans, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Promoter Regions, Genetic, Protein Interaction Mapping, RNA Polymerase II, Receptors, LDL, Response Elements, Transcription Factor RelA, Transcription, Genetic, Tunica Intima, Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1
Show Abstract · Added September 6, 2016
RATIONALE - Human and murine Vcam1 promoters contain 2 adjacent nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)-binding elements. Both are essential for cytokine-induced transcription of transiently transfected promoter-reporter constructs. However, the relevance of these insights to regulation of the endogenous Vcam1 gene and to pathophysiological processes in vivo remained unknown.
OBJECTIVE - Determine the role of the 5' NF-κB-binding element in expression of the endogenous Vcam1 gene.
METHODS AND RESULTS - Homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells was used to inactivate the 5' NF-κB element in the Vcam1 promoter and alter 3 nucleotides in the 5' untranslated region to allow direct comparison of wild-type versus mutant allele RNA expression and chromatin configuration in heterozygous mice. Systemic treatment with inflammatory cytokines or endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide) induced lower expression of the mutant allele relative to wild-type by endothelial cells in the aorta, heart, and lungs. The mutant allele also showed lower endothelial expression in 2-week atherosclerotic lesions in Vcam1 heterozygous/low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice fed a cholesterol-rich diet. In vivo chromatin immunoprecipitation assays of heart showed diminished lipopolysaccharide-induced association of RNA polymerase 2 and NF-κB p65 with the mutant promoter. In contrast, expression of mutant and wild-type alleles was comparable in intimal cells of wire-injured carotid artery and 4- to 12-week atherosclerotic lesions.
CONCLUSIONS - This study highlights differences between in vivo and in vitro promoter analyses, and reveals a differential role for a NF-κB transcriptional response element in endothelial vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression induced by inflammatory cytokines or a cholesterol-rich diet versus intimal cell expression in atherosclerotic lesions and injured arteries.
© 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.
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23 MeSH Terms
Lymphocyte adaptor protein LNK deficiency exacerbates hypertension and end-organ inflammation.
Saleh MA, McMaster WG, Wu J, Norlander AE, Funt SA, Thabet SR, Kirabo A, Xiao L, Chen W, Itani HA, Michell D, Huan T, Zhang Y, Takaki S, Titze J, Levy D, Harrison DG, Madhur MS
(2015) J Clin Invest 125: 1189-202
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cells, Cultured, Chemotaxis, Leukocyte, Hypertension, Interferon-gamma, Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins, Kidney, Membrane Proteins, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Nephritis, Oxidative Stress, T-Lymphocytes, Vasculitis
Show Abstract · Added March 31, 2015
The lymphocyte adaptor protein LNK (also known as SH2B3) is primarily expressed in hematopoietic and endothelial cells, where it functions as a negative regulator of cytokine signaling and cell proliferation. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the gene encoding LNK are associated with autoimmune and cardiovascular disorders; however, it is not known how LNK contributes to hypertension. Here, we determined that loss of LNK exacerbates angiotensin II-induced (Ang II-induced) hypertension and the associated renal and vascular dysfunction. At baseline, kidneys from Lnk-/- mice exhibited greater levels of inflammation, oxidative stress, and glomerular injury compared with WT animals, and these parameters were further exacerbated by Ang II infusion. Aortas from Lnk-/- mice exhibited enhanced inflammation, reduced nitric oxide levels, and impaired endothelial-dependent relaxation. Bone marrow transplantation studies demonstrated that loss of LNK in hematopoietic cells is primarily responsible for the observed renal and vascular inflammation and predisposition to hypertension. Ang II infusion increased IFN-γ-producing CD8+ T cells in the spleen and kidneys of Lnk-/- mice compared with WT mice. Moreover, IFN-γ deficiency resulted in blunted hypertension in response to Ang II infusion. Together, these results suggest that LNK is a potential therapeutic target for hypertension and its associated renal and vascular sequela.
2 Communities
3 Members
0 Resources
14 MeSH Terms
Dysfunctional high-density lipoproteins in children with chronic kidney disease.
Kaseda R, Jabs K, Hunley TE, Jones D, Bian A, Allen RM, Vickers KC, Yancey PG, Linton MF, Fazio S, Kon V
(2015) Metabolism 64: 263-73
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Apoptosis, Biological Transport, Cardiovascular Diseases, Cell Adhesion, Cell Line, Cell Proliferation, Cells, Cultured, Chemotaxis, Child, Child, Preschool, Cholesterol, Coculture Techniques, Endothelium, Vascular, Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells, Humans, Infant, Kidney Failure, Chronic, Lipoproteins, HDL, Macrophages, Renal Insufficiency, Chronic, Risk Factors, Severity of Illness Index, Tennessee
Show Abstract · Added February 12, 2015
OBJECTIVES - Our aim was to determine if chronic kidney disease (CKD) occurring in childhood impairs the normally vasoprotective functions of high-density lipoproteins (HDLs).
MATERIALS AND METHODS - HDLs were isolated from children with end-stage renal disease on dialysis (ESRD), children with moderate CKD and controls with normal kidney function. Macrophage response to HDLs was studied as expression of inflammatory markers (MCP-1, TNF-α, IL-1β) and chemotaxis. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were used for expression of adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, VCAM-1, E-selectin) and adhesion. Cellular proliferation, apoptosis, and necrosis of endothelial cells were measured by MTS/PMS reagent-based assay, flow cytometry, and ELISA. Cholesterol efflux was assessed by gas chromatographic measurements of cholesterol in macrophages exposed to HDLs.
RESULTS - Compared with HDL(Control), HDL(CKD) and HDL(ESRD) heightened the cytokine response and disrupted macrophage chemotaxis. HDL(Control) reduced endothelial expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, E-selectin, whereas HDL(CKD) and HDL(ESRD) were less effective and showed reduced capacity to protect endothelial cells against monocyte adhesion. Compared with a dramatically enhanced endothelial proliferation following injurious stimulus by HDL(Control), neither HDL(CKD) nor HDL(ESRD) caused proliferative effects. HDLs of all three groups were equally protective against apoptosis assessed by flow cytometry and cleaved caspase-3 activity. Compared to HDL(Control), HDL(CKD) and HDL(ESRD) trended toward reduced capacity as cholesterol acceptors.
CONCLUSION - CKD in children impairs HDL function. Even in the absence of long-standing and concomitant risk factors, CKD alters specific HDL functions linked to control of inflammation and endothelial responses.
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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2 Members
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24 MeSH Terms
Interactions and tradeoffs between cell recruitment, proliferation, and differentiation affect CNS regeneration.
Holmes WR, Nie Q
(2014) Biophys J 106: 1528-36
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Aggregation, Cell Cycle, Cell Differentiation, Cell Movement, Cell Proliferation, Central Nervous System, Chemotaxis, Computer Simulation, Feedback, Physiological, Mice, Models, Neurological, Multiple Sclerosis, Nerve Regeneration, Neurogenesis, Stochastic Processes, Time Factors
Show Abstract · Added February 26, 2016
Regeneration of central nervous system (CNS) lesions requires movement of progenitor cells and production of their differentiated progeny. Although damage to the CNS clearly promotes these two processes, the interplay between these complex events and how it affects a response remains elusive. Here, we use spatial stochastic modeling to show that tradeoffs arise between production and recruitment during regeneration. Proper spatial control of cell cycle timing can mitigate these tradeoffs, maximizing recruitment, improving infiltration into the lesion, and reducing wasteful production outside of it. Feedback regulation of cell lineage dynamics alone however leads to spatial defects in cell recruitment, suggesting a novel, to our knowledge, hypothesis for the aggregation of cells to the periphery of a lesion in multiple sclerosis. Interestingly, stronger chemotaxis does not correct this aggregation and instead, substantial random cell motions near the site of the lesion are required to improve CNS regeneration.
Copyright © 2014 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
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17 MeSH Terms
An excitable compass guides chemotaxis?
Holmes WR
(2014) Biophys J 106: 989-90
MeSH Terms: Chemotaxis, Dictyostelium, Phosphatidylinositol Phosphates, Signal Transduction
Added February 26, 2016
0 Communities
1 Members
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4 MeSH Terms
Adaptor protein2 (AP2) orchestrates CXCR2-mediated cell migration.
Raman D, Sai J, Hawkins O, Richmond A
(2014) Traffic 15: 451-69
MeSH Terms: Adaptor Protein Complex 2, Base Sequence, Chemotaxis, DNA Primers, Endocytosis, HEK293 Cells, HL-60 Cells, Humans, Mutagenesis, Site-Directed, Receptors, Interleukin-8B
Show Abstract · Added January 30, 2014
The chemokine receptor CXCR2 is vital for inflammation, wound healing, angiogenesis, cancer progression and metastasis. Adaptor protein 2 (AP2), a clathrin binding heterotetrameric protein comprised of α, β2, μ2 and σ2 subunits, facilitates clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Mutation of the LLKIL motif in the CXCR2 carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) results in loss of AP2 binding to the receptor and loss of ligand-mediated receptor internalization and chemotaxis. AP2 knockdown also results in diminished ligand-mediated CXCR2 internalization, polarization and chemotaxis. Using knockdown/rescue approaches with AP2-μ2 mutants, the binding domains were characterized in reference to CXCR2 internalization and chemotaxis. When in an open conformation, μ2 Patch 1 and Patch 2 domains bind tightly to membrane PIP2 phospholipids. When AP2-μ2, is replaced with μ2 mutated in Patch 1 and/or Patch 2 domains, ligand-mediated receptor binding and internalization are not lost. However, chemotaxis requires AP2-μ2 Patch 1, but not Patch 2. AP2-σ2 has been demonstrated to bind dileucine motifs to facilitate internalization. Expression of AP2-σ2 V88D and V98S dominant negative mutants resulted in loss of CXCR2 mediated chemotaxis. Thus, AP2 binding to both membrane phosphatidylinositol phospholipids and dileucine motifs is crucial for directional migration or chemotaxis. Moreover, AP2-mediated receptor internalization can be dissociated from AP2-mediated chemotaxis.
© 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
2 Communities
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10 MeSH Terms