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Regulation of tissue iron homeostasis: the macrophage "ferrostat".
Winn NC, Volk KM, Hasty AH
(2020) JCI Insight 5:
MeSH Terms: Adipose Tissue, Animals, Bone Marrow, Bone and Bones, Central Nervous System, Disease, Erythropoiesis, Health, Homeostasis, Humans, Iron, Liver, Macrophages, Muscle, Skeletal, Myocardium, Pancreas, Skin, Spleen, Wound Healing
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Iron is an essential element for multiple fundamental biological processes required for life; yet iron overload can be cytotoxic. Consequently, iron concentrations at the cellular and tissue level must be exquisitely governed by mechanisms that complement and fine-tune systemic control. It is well appreciated that macrophages are vital for systemic iron homeostasis, supplying or sequestering iron as needed for erythropoiesis or bacteriostasis, respectively. Indeed, recycling of iron through erythrophagocytosis by splenic macrophages is a major contributor to systemic iron homeostasis. However, accumulating evidence suggests that tissue-resident macrophages regulate local iron availability and modulate the tissue microenvironment, contributing to cellular and tissue function. Here, we summarize the significance of tissue-specific regulation of iron availability and highlight how resident macrophages are critical for this process. This tissue-dependent regulation has broad implications for understanding both resident macrophage function and tissue iron homeostasis in health and disease.
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19 MeSH Terms
Unmet need in rheumatology: reports from the Targeted Therapies meeting 2019.
Winthrop KL, Weinblatt ME, Bathon J, Burmester GR, Mease PJ, Crofford L, Bykerk V, Dougados M, Rosenbaum JT, Mariette X, Sieper J, Melchers F, Cronstein BN, Breedveld FC, Kalden J, Smolen JS, Furst D
(2020) Ann Rheum Dis 79: 88-93
MeSH Terms: Arthritis, Psoriatic, Arthritis, Rheumatoid, Biomedical Research, Central Nervous System Sensitization, Clinical Trials as Topic, Congresses as Topic, Humans, Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic, Molecular Targeted Therapy, Needs Assessment, Research, Research Design, Rheumatic Diseases, Rheumatology, Spondylitis, Ankylosing
Show Abstract · Added March 25, 2020
OBJECTIVES - To detail the greatest areas of unmet scientific and clinical needs in rheumatology.
METHODS - The 21st annual international Advances in Targeted Therapies meeting brought together more than 100 leading basic scientists and clinical researchers in rheumatology, immunology, epidemiology, molecular biology and other specialties. During the meeting, breakout sessions were convened, consisting of 5 disease-specific groups with 20-30 experts assigned to each group based on expertise. Specific groups included: rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, axial spondyloarthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and other systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases. In each group, experts were asked to identify unmet clinical and translational research needs in general and then to prioritise and detail the most important specific needs within each disease area.
RESULTS - Overarching themes across all disease states included the need to innovate clinical trial design with emphasis on studying patients with refractory disease, the development of trials that take into account disease endotypes and patients with overlapping inflammatory diseases, the need to better understand the prevalence and incidence of inflammatory diseases in developing regions of the world and ultimately to develop therapies that can cure inflammatory autoimmune diseases.
CONCLUSIONS - Unmet needs for new therapies and trial designs, particularly for those with treatment refractory disease, remain a top priority in rheumatology.
© Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2020. Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.
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15 MeSH Terms
Developmentally regulated KCC2 phosphorylation is essential for dynamic GABA-mediated inhibition and survival.
Watanabe M, Zhang J, Mansuri MS, Duan J, Karimy JK, Delpire E, Alper SL, Lifton RP, Fukuda A, Kahle KT
(2019) Sci Signal 12:
MeSH Terms: Animals, Animals, Newborn, Binding Sites, Cells, Cultured, Central Nervous System, Chlorides, Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental, Male, Mice, 129 Strain, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Neurons, Phosphorylation, Signal Transduction, Symporters, gamma-Aminobutyric Acid
Show Abstract · Added March 18, 2020
Despite its importance for γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) inhibition and involvement in neurodevelopmental disease, the regulatory mechanisms of the K/Cl cotransporter KCC2 (encoded by ) during maturation of the central nervous system (CNS) are not entirely understood. Here, we applied quantitative phosphoproteomics to systematically map sites of KCC2 phosphorylation during CNS development in the mouse. KCC2 phosphorylation at Thr and Thr, which inhibits KCC2 activity, underwent dephosphorylation in parallel with the GABA excitatory-inhibitory sequence in vivo. Knockin mice expressing the homozygous phosphomimetic KCC2 mutations T906E/T1007E ( ), which prevented the normal developmentally regulated dephosphorylation of these sites, exhibited early postnatal death from respiratory arrest and a marked absence of cervical spinal neuron respiratory discharges. mice also displayed disrupted lumbar spinal neuron locomotor rhythmogenesis and touch-evoked status epilepticus associated with markedly impaired KCC2-dependent Cl extrusion. These data identify a previously unknown phosphorylation-dependent KCC2 regulatory mechanism during CNS development that is essential for dynamic GABA-mediated inhibition and survival.
Copyright © 2019 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.
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16 MeSH Terms
Functional Coupling of K-Cl Cotransporter (KCC) to GABA-Gated Cl Channels in the Central Nervous System of Drosophila melanogaster Leads to Altered Drug Sensitivities.
Chen R, Prael FJ, Li Z, Delpire E, Weaver CD, Swale DR
(2019) ACS Chem Neurosci 10: 2765-2776
MeSH Terms: Animals, Central Nervous System, Chloride Channels, Drosophila Proteins, Drosophila melanogaster, Insecticide Resistance, Neurons, Signal Transduction, Symporters, Synaptic Transmission, gamma-Aminobutyric Acid
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2019
GABAergic signaling is the cornerstone for fast synaptic inhibition of neural signaling in arthropods and mammals and is the molecular target for insecticides and pharmaceuticals, respectively. The K-Cl cotransporter (KCC) is the primary mechanism by which mature neurons maintain low intracellular Cl concentration, yet the fundamental physiology, comparative physiology, and toxicological relevance of insect KCC is understudied. Considering this, we employed electrophysiological, genetic, and pharmacological methods to characterize the physiological underpinnings of KCC function to the Drosophila CNS. Our data show that genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of KCC results in an increased spike discharge frequency and significantly ( P < 0.05) reduces the CNS sensitivity to γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Further, simultaneous inhibition of KCC and ligand-gated chloride channel (LGCC) complex results in a significant ( P < 0.001) increase in CNS spontaneous activity over baseline firing rates that supports functional coupling of KCC to LGCC function. Interestingly, 75% reduction in KCC mRNA did not alter basal neurotransmission levels indicating that only a fraction of the KCC population is required to maintain the Cl ionic gradient when at rest, but prolonged synaptic activity increases the threshold for GABA-mediated inhibition and reduces nerve sensitivity to GABA. These data expand current knowledge regarding the physiological role of KCC in a model insect and provides the necessary foundation to develop KCC as a novel biochemical target of insecticides, as well as complements existing research to provide a holistic understanding of the plasticity in mammalian health and disease.
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11 MeSH Terms
Surveying heterocycles as amide bioisosteres within a series of mGlu NAMs: Discovery of VU6019278.
Reed CW, Washecheck JP, Quitlag MC, Jenkins MT, Rodriguez AL, Engers DW, Blobaum AL, Conn PJ, Niswender CM, Lindsley CW
(2019) Bioorg Med Chem Lett 29: 1211-1214
MeSH Terms: Allosteric Regulation, Amides, Animals, Central Nervous System, Hepatocytes, Heterocyclic Compounds, Inhibitory Concentration 50, Pyrazoles, Rats, Receptors, Metabotropic Glutamate, Structure-Activity Relationship
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
This letter describes a diversity-oriented library approach to rapidly assess diverse heterocycles as bioisosteric replacements for a metabolically labile amide moiety within a series of mGlu negative allosteric modulators (NAMs). SAR rapidly honed in on either a 1,2,4- or 1,3,4-oxadizaole ring system as an effective bioisostere for the amide. Further optimization of the southern region of the mGlu NAM chemotype led to the discovery of VU6019278, a potent mGlu NAM (IC = 501 nM, 6.3% L-AP Min) with favorable plasma protein binding (rat f = 0.10), low predicted hepatic clearance (rat CL = 27.7 mL/min/kg) and high CNS penetration (rat K = 4.9, K = 0.65).
Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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The in vivo specificity of synaptic Gβ and Gγ subunits to the α adrenergic receptor at CNS synapses.
Yim YY, Betke KM, McDonald WH, Gilsbach R, Chen Y, Hyde K, Wang Q, Hein L, Hamm HE
(2019) Sci Rep 9: 1718
MeSH Terms: Animals, Central Nervous System, Epinephrine, GTP-Binding Protein beta Subunits, GTP-Binding Protein gamma Subunits, Gene Knock-In Techniques, Mice, Proteomics, Receptors, Adrenergic, alpha-2, Signal Transduction, Synapses
Show Abstract · Added March 24, 2020
G proteins are major transducers of signals from G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). They are made up of α, β, and γ subunits, with 16 Gα, 5 Gβ and 12 Gγ subunits. Though much is known about the specificity of Gα subunits, the specificity of Gβγs activated by a given GPCR and that activate each effector in vivo is not known. Here, we examined the in vivo Gβγ specificity of presynaptic α-adrenergic receptors (αARs) in both adrenergic (auto-αARs) and non-adrenergic neurons (hetero-αARs) for the first time. With a quantitative MRM proteomic analysis of neuronal Gβ and Gγ subunits, and co-immunoprecipitation of tagged αARs from mouse models including transgenic FLAG-αARs and knock-in HA-αARs, we investigated the in vivo specificity of Gβ and Gγ subunits to auto-αARs and hetero-αARs activated with epinephrine to understand the role of Gβγ specificity in diverse physiological functions such as anesthetic sparing, and working memory enhancement. We detected Gβ, Gγ, Gγ, and Gγ with activated auto αARs, whereas we found Gβ and Gγ preferentially interacted with activated hetero-αARs. Further understanding of in vivo Gβγ specificity to various GPCRs offers new insights into the multiplicity of genes for Gβ and Gγ, and the mechanisms underlying GPCR signaling through Gβγ subunits.
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11 MeSH Terms
Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms Mediate the Effects of Trauma Exposure on Clinical Indicators of Central Sensitization in Patients With Chronic Pain.
McKernan LC, Johnson BN, Crofford LJ, Lumley MA, Bruehl S, Cheavens JS
(2019) Clin J Pain 35: 385-393
MeSH Terms: Adult, Central Nervous System Sensitization, Chronic Pain, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Self Report, Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic, Surveys and Questionnaires
Show Abstract · Added March 25, 2020
OBJECTIVE - Evidence supports high rates of co-occurrence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and chronic pain disorders involving central sensitization (CS). The nature of this relationship, however, remains relatively unexplored. In this study, we aimed to (1) assess how both trauma exposure and current PTSD symptoms are related to clinical manifestations of CS, and (2) test whether PTSD symptoms explain the relationship between trauma exposure and CS. Because experiential avoidance has been shown to impact the relationship between trauma and health outcomes, we (3) explored experiential avoidance as a possible mediator or moderator of the trauma-CS relationship.
METHODS - A sample of 202 adult patients (79% female) with chronic pain completed validated self-report measures of trauma exposure, current PTSD symptoms, experiential avoidance, and 3 manifestations of CS: widespread pain, greater pain severity, and polysomatic symptom reporting. We used path analysis and multivariate regression to assess our study aims.
RESULTS - Both trauma exposure and PTSD symptoms were significantly associated with all 3 clinical indicators of CS. PTSD symptoms partially explained the relationship between trauma exposure and widespread pain, pain intensity, and polysomatic symptoms. Experiential avoidance did not mediate or moderate the trauma-CS relationship.
CONCLUSIONS - Our findings suggest that trauma exposure is linked to elevated clinical markers of CS but a critical factor in this relationship is the mediating effect of current PTSD symptoms.
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10 MeSH Terms
Discovery of Novel Central Nervous System Penetrant Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Subtype 2 (mGlu) Negative Allosteric Modulators (NAMs) Based on Functionalized Pyrazolo[1,5- a]pyrimidine-5-carboxamide and Thieno[3,2- b]pyridine-5-carboxamide Cores.
Childress ES, Wieting JM, Felts AS, Breiner MM, Long MF, Luscombe VB, Rodriguez AL, Cho HP, Blobaum AL, Niswender CM, Emmitte KA, Conn PJ, Lindsley CW
(2019) J Med Chem 62: 378-384
MeSH Terms: Allosteric Regulation, Amides, Animals, Central Nervous System, Drug Evaluation, Preclinical, Half-Life, Humans, Inhibitory Concentration 50, Protein Isoforms, Pyrazoles, Pyridines, Pyrimidines, Rats, Receptors, Metabotropic Glutamate, Structure-Activity Relationship
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
A scaffold hopping exercise from a monocyclic mGlu NAM with poor rodent PK led to two novel heterobicyclic series of mGlu NAMs based on either a functionalized pyrazolo[1,5- a]pyrimidine-5-carboxamide core or a thieno[3,2- b]pyridine-5-carboxamide core. These novel analogues possess enhanced rodent PK, while also maintaining good mGlu NAM potency, selectivity (versus mGlu and the remaining six mGlu receptors), and high CNS penetration. Interestingly, SAR was divergent between the new 5,6-heterobicyclic systems.
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Lack of consistent sex differences in D-amphetamine-induced dopamine release measured with [F]fallypride PET.
Smith CT, Dang LC, Burgess LL, Perkins SF, San Juan MD, Smith DK, Cowan RL, Le NT, Kessler RM, Samanez-Larkin GR, Zald DH
(2019) Psychopharmacology (Berl) 236: 581-590
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Benzamides, Central Nervous System Stimulants, Dextroamphetamine, Dopamine, Female, Fluorine Radioisotopes, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Positron-Emission Tomography, Receptors, Dopamine D2, Receptors, Dopamine D3, Sex Characteristics, Sex Factors, Ventral Striatum, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added April 15, 2019
RATIONALE - Sex differences in the dopaminergic response to psychostimulants could have implications for drug abuse risk and other psychopathology involving the dopamine system, but human data are limited and mixed.
OBJECTIVES - Here, we sought to investigate sex differences in dopamine release after oral D-amphetamine administration.
METHODS - We used [F]fallypride positron emission tomography (PET) to measure the change in dopamine D2/3 receptor availability (%ΔBP, an index of dopamine release) between placebo and D-amphetamine sessions in two independent datasets containing a total of 39 females (on either hormonal birth control n = 18, postmenopausal n = 10, or studied in the first 10 days of their menstrual cycle n = 11) and 37 males.
RESULTS - Using both a priori anatomical regions of interest based on previous findings and voxelwise analyses, we failed to consistently detect broad sex differences in D-amphetamine-induced dopamine release. Nevertheless, there was limited evidence for greater right ventral striatal dopamine release in young adult males relative to similarly aged females, but this was not consistently observed across samples. Plasma estradiol did not correlate with dopamine release and this measure did not differ in females on and off hormonal birth control.
CONCLUSIONS - While our finding in young adults from one dataset of greater %ΔBP in males is partially consistent with a previously published study on sex differences in D-amphetamine-induced dopamine release, our data do not support the presence of consistent widespread sex differences in this measure of dopamine release.
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18 MeSH Terms
Women Undergoing Third Line Overactive Bladder Treatment Demonstrate Elevated Thermal Temporal Summation.
Reynolds WS, Kowalik C, Cohn J, Kaufman M, Wein A, Dmochowski R, Bruehl S
(2018) J Urol 200: 856-861
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Botulinum Toxins, Type A, Central Nervous System Sensitization, Cohort Studies, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Hot Temperature, Humans, Linear Models, Lumbosacral Plexus, Middle Aged, Pain Perception, Retrospective Studies, Risk Assessment, Severity of Illness Index, Temporal Lobe, Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation, Treatment Outcome, Urinary Bladder, Overactive
Show Abstract · Added September 16, 2019
PURPOSE - We sought to determine whether women with overactive bladder who required third line therapy would demonstrate greater central sensitization, indexed by temporal summation to heat pain stimuli, than those with overactive bladder.
MATERIALS AND METHODS - We recruited 39 women with overactive bladder from the urology clinic who were planning to undergo interventional therapy for medication refractory overactive bladder with onabotulinumtoxinA bladder injection or sacral neuromodulation. We also recruited 55 women with overactive bladder who were newly seen at our urology clinic or who responded to advertisements for study participation. Participants underwent quantitative sensory testing using a thermal temporal summation protocol. The primary study outcome was the degree of temporal summation as reflected in the magnitude of positive slope of the line fit to the series of 10 stimuli at a 49C target temperature. We compared the degree of temporal summation between the study groups using linear regression.
RESULTS - Women in the group undergoing third line therapy showed significantly higher standardized temporal summation slopes than those in the nontreatment group (β = 1.57, 95% CI 0.18-2.96, t = 2.25, p = 0.027). On exploratory analyses a history of incontinence surgery or hysterectomy was associated with significantly greater temporal summation.
CONCLUSIONS - In this study the degree of temporal summation was elevated in women undergoing third line overactive bladder therapy compared to women with overactive bladder who were not undergoing that therapy. These findings suggest there may be pathophysiological differences, specifically in afferent nerve function and processing, in some women with overactive bladder.
Copyright © 2018 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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