Other search tools

About this data

The publication data currently available has been vetted by Vanderbilt faculty, staff, administrators and trainees. The data itself is retrieved directly from NCBI's PubMed and is automatically updated on a weekly basis to ensure accuracy and completeness.

If you have any questions or comments, please contact us.

Results: 1 to 10 of 521

Publication Record

Connections

Myosin IIA drives membrane bleb retraction.
Taneja N, Burnette DT
(2019) Mol Biol Cell 30: 1051-1059
MeSH Terms: Actins, Animals, Blister, COS Cells, Cell Membrane, Cell Membrane Structures, Cell Movement, Cell Surface Extensions, Cercopithecus aethiops, Cytokinesis, Cytoplasm, Cytoskeletal Proteins, HeLa Cells, Humans, Myosin Type II, Nerve Tissue Proteins, Nonmuscle Myosin Type IIA, Nonmuscle Myosin Type IIB
Show Abstract · Added March 27, 2019
Membrane blebs are specialized cellular protrusions that play diverse roles in processes such as cell division and cell migration. Blebbing can be divided into three distinct phases: bleb nucleation, bleb growth, and bleb retraction. Following nucleation and bleb growth, the actin cortex, comprising actin, cross-linking proteins, and nonmuscle myosin II (MII), begins to reassemble on the membrane. MII then drives the final phase, bleb retraction, which results in reintegration of the bleb into the cellular cortex. There are three MII paralogues with distinct biophysical properties expressed in mammalian cells: MIIA, MIIB, and MIIC. Here we show that MIIA specifically drives bleb retraction during cytokinesis. The motor domain and regulation of the nonhelical tailpiece of MIIA both contribute to its ability to drive bleb retraction. These experiments have also revealed a relationship between faster turnover of MIIA at the cortex and its ability to drive bleb retraction.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
18 MeSH Terms
Substrate stiffness heterogeneities disrupt endothelial barrier integrity in a micropillar model of heterogeneous vascular stiffening.
VanderBurgh JA, Hotchkiss H, Potharazu A, Taufalele PV, Reinhart-King CA
(2018) Integr Biol (Camb) 10: 734-746
MeSH Terms: Adherens Junctions, Animals, Aorta, Atherosclerosis, Cattle, Cell Adhesion, Cell Communication, Cell Movement, Dimethylpolysiloxanes, Endothelial Cells, Endothelium, Vascular, Focal Adhesions, Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells, Humans, Leukocytes, Materials Testing, Neutrophils, Phenotype, Tunica Intima, Vascular Stiffness, Vinculin
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2019
Intimal stiffening has been linked with increased vascular permeability and leukocyte transmigration, hallmarks of atherosclerosis. However, recent evidence indicates age-related intimal stiffening is not uniform but rather characterized by increased point-to-point heterogeneity in subendothelial matrix stiffness, the impact of which is much less understood. To investigate the impact of spatially heterogeneous matrix rigidity on endothelial monolayer integrity, we develop a micropillar model to introduce closely-spaced, step-changes in substrate rigidity and compare endothelial monolayer phenotype to rigidity-matched, uniformly stiff and compliant substrates. We found equivalent disruption of adherens junctions within monolayers on step-rigidity and uniformly stiff substrates relative to uniformly compliant substrates. Similarly, monolayers cultured on step-rigidity substrates exhibited equivalent percentages of leukocyte transmigration to monolayers on rigidity-matched, uniformly stiff substrates. Adherens junction tension and focal adhesion density, but not size, increased within monolayers on step-rigidity and uniformly stiff substrates compared to more compliant substrates suggesting that elevated tension is disrupting adherens junction integrity. Leukocyte transmigration frequency and time, focal adhesion size, and focal adhesion density did not differ between stiff and compliant sub-regions of step-rigidity substrates. Overall, our results suggest that endothelial monolayers exposed to mechanically heterogeneous substrates adopt the phenotype associated with the stiffer matrix, indicating that spatial heterogeneities in intimal stiffness observed with age could disrupt endothelial barrier integrity and contribute to atherogenesis.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
21 MeSH Terms
ROCK-nmMyoII, Notch and gene-dosage link epithelial morphogenesis with cell fate in the pancreatic endocrine-progenitor niche.
Bankaitis ED, Bechard ME, Gu G, Magnuson MA, Wright CVE
(2018) Development 145:
MeSH Terms: Animals, Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors, Cell Differentiation, Cell Movement, Endocrine Cells, Gene Dosage, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, Nerve Tissue Proteins, Organogenesis, Pancreas, Receptors, Notch, Stem Cells, Transcriptional Activation, rho-Associated Kinases
Show Abstract · Added August 24, 2018
During mouse pancreas organogenesis, endocrine cells are born from progenitors residing in an epithelial plexus niche. After a period in a lineage-primed state, progenitors become endocrine committed via upregulation of We find that the to transition is associated with distinct stages of an epithelial egression process: narrowing the apical surface of the cell, basalward cell movement and eventual cell-rear detachment from the apical lumen surface to allow clustering as nascent islets under the basement membrane. Apical narrowing, basalward movement and transcriptional upregulation still occur without Neurog3 protein, suggesting that morphogenetic cues deployed within the plexus initiate endocrine commitment upstream or independently of Neurog3. Neurog3 is required for cell-rear detachment and complete endocrine-cell birth. The ROCK-nmMyoII pathway coordinates epithelial-cell morphogenesis and the progression through -expressing states. NmMyoII is necessary for apical narrowing, basalward cell displacement and upregulation, but all three are limited by ROCK activity. We propose that ROCK-nmMyoII activity, gene-dose and Notch signaling integrate endocrine fate allocation with epithelial plexus growth and morphogenesis, representing a feedback control circuit that coordinates morphogenesis with lineage diversification in the endocrine-birth niche.
© 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.
2 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
15 MeSH Terms
Quantitative in vivo whole genome motility screen reveals novel therapeutic targets to block cancer metastasis.
Stoletov K, Willetts L, Paproski RJ, Bond DJ, Raha S, Jovel J, Adam B, Robertson AE, Wong F, Woolner E, Sosnowski DL, Bismar TA, Wong GK, Zijlstra A, Lewis JD
(2018) Nat Commun 9: 2343
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Line, Tumor, Cell Movement, Chick Embryo, Collagen, Female, Gene Expression Profiling, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Humans, Male, Mice, Mice, Nude, Mice, SCID, Neoplasm Invasiveness, Neoplasm Metastasis, Neoplasm Transplantation, Phenotype, Prostatic Neoplasms, RNA Interference, RNA, Small Interfering
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2019
Metastasis is the most lethal aspect of cancer, yet current therapeutic strategies do not target its key rate-limiting steps. We have previously shown that the entry of cancer cells into the blood stream, or intravasation, is highly dependent upon in vivo cancer cell motility, making it an attractive therapeutic target. To systemically identify genes required for tumor cell motility in an in vivo tumor microenvironment, we established a novel quantitative in vivo screening platform based on intravital imaging of human cancer metastasis in ex ovo avian embryos. Utilizing this platform to screen a genome-wide shRNA library, we identified a panel of novel genes whose function is required for productive cancer cell motility in vivo, and whose expression is closely associated with metastatic risk in human cancers. The RNAi-mediated inhibition of these gene targets resulted in a nearly total (>99.5%) block of spontaneous cancer metastasis in vivo.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms
Mechanosensitive Ion Channels: TRPV4 and P2X7 in Disseminating Cancer Cells.
Hope JM, Greenlee JD, King MR
(2018) Cancer J 24: 84-92
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Movement, Humans, Mechanotransduction, Cellular, Neoplasms, Receptors, Purinergic P2X7, TRPV Cation Channels
Show Abstract · Added April 15, 2019
Cancer metastasis is the second leading cause of death in the United States. Despite its morbidity, metastasis is an inefficient process that few cells can survive. However, cancer cells can overcome these metastatic barriers via cellular responses to microenvironmental cues, such as through mechanotransduction. This review focuses on the mechanosensitive ion channels TRPV4 and P2X7, and their roles in metastasis, as both channels have been shown to significantly affect tumor cell dissemination. Upon activation, these channels help form tumor neovasculature, promote transendothelial migration, and increase cell motility. Conversely, they have also been linked to forms of cancer cell death dependent upon levels of activation, implying the complex functionality of mechanosensitive ion channels. Understanding the roles of TRPV4, P2X7 and other mechanosensitive ion channels in these processes may reveal new possible drug targets that modify channel function to reduce a tumor's metastatic potential.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms
Inverted formin 2 regulates intracellular trafficking, placentation, and pregnancy outcome.
Lamm KYB, Johnson ML, Baker Phillips J, Muntifering MB, James JM, Jones HN, Redline RW, Rokas A, Muglia LJ
(2018) Elife 7:
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Differentiation, Cell Movement, Female, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Microfilament Proteins, Placentation, Pregnancy, Pregnancy Outcome, Trophoblasts
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2018
Healthy pregnancy depends on proper placentation-including proliferation, differentiation, and invasion of trophoblast cells-which, if impaired, causes placental ischemia resulting in intrauterine growth restriction and preeclampsia. Mechanisms regulating trophoblast invasion, however, are unknown. We report that reduction of ( alters intracellular trafficking and significantly impairs invasion in a model of human extravillous trophoblasts. Furthermore, global loss of in mice recapitulates maternal and fetal phenotypes of placental insufficiency. dams have reduced spiral artery numbers and late gestational hypertension with resolution following delivery. fetuses are growth restricted and demonstrate changes in umbilical artery Doppler consistent with poor placental perfusion and fetal distress. Loss of increases fetal vascular density in the placenta and dysregulates trophoblast expression of angiogenic factors. Our data support a critical regulatory role for in trophoblast invasion-a necessary process for placentation-representing a possible future target for improving placentation and fetal outcomes.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
11 MeSH Terms
Müller glial microRNAs are required for the maintenance of glial homeostasis and retinal architecture.
Wohl SG, Jorstad NL, Levine EM, Reh TA
(2017) Nat Commun 8: 1603
MeSH Terms: 3T3 Cells, Animals, Cell Movement, Cells, Cultured, DEAD-box RNA Helicases, Ependymoglial Cells, Gene Expression Profiling, Homeostasis, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Mice, Transgenic, MicroRNAs, Microscopy, Confocal, Neuroglia, Retina, Ribonuclease III
Show Abstract · Added February 14, 2018
To better understand the roles of microRNAs in glial function, we used a conditional deletion of Dicer1 (Dicer-CKO) in retinal Müller glia (MG). Dicer1 deletion from the MG leads to an abnormal migration of the cells as early as 1 month after the deletion. By 6 months after Dicer1 deletion, the MG form large aggregations and severely disrupt normal retinal architecture and function. The most highly upregulated gene in the Dicer-CKO MG is the proteoglycan Brevican (Bcan) and overexpression of Bcan results in similar aggregations of the MG in wild-type retina. One potential microRNA that regulates Bcan is miR-9, and overexpression of miR-9 can partly rescue the effects of Dicer1 deletion on the MG phenotype. We also find that MG from retinitis pigmentosa patients display an increase in Brevican immunoreactivity at sites of MG aggregation, linking the retinal remodeling that occurs in chronic disease with microRNAs.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
16 MeSH Terms
Non-visual arrestins regulate the focal adhesion formation via small GTPases RhoA and Rac1 independently of GPCRs.
Cleghorn WM, Bulus N, Kook S, Gurevich VV, Zent R, Gurevich EV
(2018) Cell Signal 42: 259-269
MeSH Terms: Actin Cytoskeleton, Animals, Cell Adhesion, Cell Line, Cell Movement, Fibroblasts, Focal Adhesions, Gene Expression Regulation, Mice, Neuropeptides, Receptors, G-Protein-Coupled, Signal Transduction, beta-Arrestin 1, beta-Arrestin 2, cdc42 GTP-Binding Protein, rac1 GTP-Binding Protein, rho GTP-Binding Proteins
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Arrestins recruit a variety of signaling proteins to active phosphorylated G protein-coupled receptors in the plasma membrane and to the cytoskeleton. Loss of arrestins leads to decreased cell migration, altered cell shape, and an increase in focal adhesions. Small GTPases of the Rho family are molecular switches that regulate actin cytoskeleton and affect a variety of dynamic cellular functions including cell migration and cell morphology. Here we show that non-visual arrestins differentially regulate RhoA and Rac1 activity to promote cell spreading via actin reorganization, and focal adhesion formation via two distinct mechanisms. Arrestins regulate these small GTPases independently of G-protein-coupled receptor activation.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
17 MeSH Terms
Regulation of ATP utilization during metastatic cell migration by collagen architecture.
Zanotelli MR, Goldblatt ZE, Miller JP, Bordeleau F, Li J, VanderBurgh JA, Lampi MC, King MR, Reinhart-King CA
(2018) Mol Biol Cell 29: 1-9
MeSH Terms: Adenosine Diphosphate, Adenosine Triphosphate, Animals, Breast Neoplasms, Cell Line, Tumor, Cell Movement, Collagen, Extracellular Matrix, Female, Glucose, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Intracellular Space, Neoplasm Metastasis, Rats, Serum
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2019
Cell migration in a three-dimensional matrix requires that cells either remodel the surrounding matrix fibers and/or squeeze between the fibers to move. Matrix degradation, matrix remodeling, and changes in cell shape each require cells to expend energy. While significant research has been performed to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms guiding metastatic migration, less is known about cellular energy regulation and utilization during three-dimensional cancer cell migration. Here we introduce the use of the genetically encoded fluorescent biomarkers, PercevalHR and pHRed, to quantitatively assess ATP, ADP, and pH levels in MDA-MB-231 metastatic cancer cells as a function of the local collagen microenvironment. We find that the use of the probe is an effective tool for exploring the thermodynamics of cancer cell migration and invasion. Specifically, we find that the ATP:ADP ratio increases in cells in denser matrices, where migration is impaired, and it decreases in cells in aligned collagen matrices, where migration is facilitated. When migration is pharmacologically inhibited, the ATP:ADP ratio decreases. Together, our data indicate that matrix architecture alters cellular energetics and that intracellular ATP:ADP ratio is related to the ability of cancer cells to effectively migrate.
© 2018 Zanotelli, Goldblatt, Miller, et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).
0 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms
UNC-45a promotes myosin folding and stress fiber assembly.
Lehtimäki JI, Fenix AM, Kotila TM, Balistreri G, Paavolainen L, Varjosalo M, Burnette DT, Lappalainen P
(2017) J Cell Biol 216: 4053-4072
MeSH Terms: Actomyosin, Cell Adhesion, Cell Line, Tumor, Cell Movement, Cell Polarity, Gene Expression, Humans, Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins, Myosin Type II, Osteoblasts, Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex, Protein Folding, Protein Isoforms, Stress Fibers, Tetratricopeptide Repeat
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Contractile actomyosin bundles, stress fibers, are crucial for adhesion, morphogenesis, and mechanosensing in nonmuscle cells. However, the mechanisms by which nonmuscle myosin II (NM-II) is recruited to those structures and assembled into functional bipolar filaments have remained elusive. We report that UNC-45a is a dynamic component of actin stress fibers and functions as a myosin chaperone in vivo. UNC-45a knockout cells display severe defects in stress fiber assembly and consequent abnormalities in cell morphogenesis, polarity, and migration. Experiments combining structured-illumination microscopy, gradient centrifugation, and proteasome inhibition approaches revealed that a large fraction of NM-II and myosin-1c molecules fail to fold in the absence of UNC-45a. The remaining properly folded NM-II molecules display defects in forming functional bipolar filaments. The C-terminal UNC-45/Cro1/She4p domain of UNC-45a is critical for NM-II folding, whereas the N-terminal tetratricopeptide repeat domain contributes to the assembly of functional stress fibers. Thus, UNC-45a promotes generation of contractile actomyosin bundles through synchronized NM-II folding and filament-assembly activities.
© 2017 Lehtimäki et al.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
15 MeSH Terms