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Spatiotemporal regulation of the Dma1-mediated mitotic checkpoint coordinates mitosis with cytokinesis.
Cullati SN, Gould KL
(2019) Curr Genet 65: 663-668
MeSH Terms: Cell Cycle Checkpoints, Cell Cycle Proteins, Cytokinesis, Mitosis, Phosphorylation, Schizosaccharomyces, Schizosaccharomyces pombe Proteins, Spatio-Temporal Analysis, Ubiquitination
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2019
During cell division, the timing of mitosis and cytokinesis must be ordered to ensure that each daughter cell receives a complete, undamaged copy of the genome. In fission yeast, the septation initiation network (SIN) is responsible for this coordination, and a mitotic checkpoint dependent on the E3 ubiquitin ligase Dma1 and the protein kinase CK1 controls SIN signaling to delay cytokinesis when there are errors in mitosis. The participation of kinases and ubiquitin ligases in cell cycle checkpoints that maintain genome integrity is conserved from yeast to human, making fission yeast an excellent model system in which to study checkpoint mechanisms. In this review, we highlight recent advances and remaining questions related to checkpoint regulation, which requires the synchronized modulation of protein ubiquitination, phosphorylation, and subcellular localization.
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9 MeSH Terms
Selective activation of epidermal growth factor receptor in renal proximal tubule induces tubulointerstitial fibrosis.
Overstreet JM, Wang Y, Wang X, Niu A, Gewin LS, Yao B, Harris RC, Zhang MZ
(2017) FASEB J 31: 4407-4421
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Cycle Checkpoints, Epithelial Cells, ErbB Receptors, Extracellular Signal-Regulated MAP Kinases, Fibrosis, Humans, Kidney, Kidney Tubules, Proximal, Mice, Transgenic, Myofibroblasts, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added September 27, 2017
Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy and renal fibrosis; however, the causative role of sustained EGFR activation is unclear. Here, we generated a novel kidney fibrotic mouse model of persistent EGFR activation by selectively expressing the EGFR ligand, human heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (hHB-EGF), in renal proximal tubule epithelium. hHB-EGF expression increased tyrosine kinase phosphorylation of EGFR and the subsequent activation of downstream signaling pathways, including ERK and AKT, as well as the profibrotic TGF-β1/SMAD pathway. Epithelial-specific activation of EGFR was sufficient to promote spontaneous and progressive renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis, as characterized by increased collagen deposition, immune cell infiltration, and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA)-positive myofibroblasts. Tubule-specific EGFR activation promoted epithelial dedifferentiation and cell-cycle arrest. Furthermore, EGFR activation in epithelial cells promoted the proliferation of α-SMA myofibroblasts in a paracrine manner. Genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of EGFR tyrosine kinase activity or downstream MEK activity attenuated the fibrotic phenotype. This study provides definitive evidence that sustained activation of EGFR in proximal epithelia is sufficient to cause spontaneous, progressive renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis, evident by epithelial dedifferentiation, increased myofibroblasts, immune cell infiltration, and increased matrix deposition.-Overstreet, J. M., Wang, Y., Wang, X., Niu, A., Gewin, L. S., Yao, B., Harris, R. C., Zhang, M.-Z. Selective activation of epidermal growth factor receptor in renal proximal tubule induces tubulointerstitial fibrosis.
© FASEB.
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12 MeSH Terms
Covalent Modification of CDK2 by 4-Hydroxynonenal as a Mechanism of Inhibition of Cell Cycle Progression.
Camarillo JM, Rose KL, Galligan JJ, Xu S, Marnett LJ
(2016) Chem Res Toxicol 29: 323-32
MeSH Terms: Aldehydes, Cell Cycle Checkpoints, Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 2, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Humans, Models, Molecular, Structure-Activity Relationship, Tumor Cells, Cultured
Show Abstract · Added April 14, 2017
Oxidative stress is a contributing factor in a number of chronic diseases, including cancer, atherosclerosis, and neurodegenerative diseases. Lipid peroxidation that occurs during periods of oxidative stress results in the formation of lipid electrophiles, which can modify a multitude of proteins in the cell. 4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) is one of the most well-studied lipid electrophiles and has previously been shown to arrest cells at the G1/S transition. Recently, proteomic data have shown that HNE is capable of covalently modifying CDK2, the kinase responsible for the G1/S transition. Here, we identify the sites adducted by HNE using recombinant CDK2 and show that HNE treatment suppresses the kinase activity of the enzyme. We further identify sites of adduction in HNE-treated intact human colorectal carcinoma cells (RKO) and show that HNE-dependent modification in cells is long-lived, disrupts CDK2 function, and correlates with a delay of progression of the cells into S-phase. We propose that adduction of CDK2 by HNE directly alters its activity, contributing to the cell cycle delay.
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8 MeSH Terms
The Replication Checkpoint Prevents Two Types of Fork Collapse without Regulating Replisome Stability.
Dungrawala H, Rose KL, Bhat KP, Mohni KN, Glick GG, Couch FB, Cortez D
(2015) Mol Cell 59: 998-1010
MeSH Terms: Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated Proteins, Cell Line, Tumor, DNA Damage, DNA Helicases, DNA Repair Enzymes, DNA Replication, DNA-Directed DNA Polymerase, Deoxyribonucleases, Enzyme Stability, HEK293 Cells, Humans, S Phase Cell Cycle Checkpoints, Transcription Factors
Show Abstract · Added February 4, 2016
The ATR replication checkpoint ensures that stalled forks remain stable when replisome movement is impeded. Using an improved iPOND protocol combined with SILAC mass spectrometry, we characterized human replisome dynamics in response to fork stalling. Our data provide a quantitative picture of the replisome and replication stress response proteomes in 32 experimental conditions. Importantly, rather than stabilize the replisome, the checkpoint prevents two distinct types of fork collapse. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of protein abundance on nascent DNA is sufficient to identify protein complexes and place newly identified replisome-associated proteins into functional pathways. As an example, we demonstrate that ZNF644 complexes with the G9a/GLP methyltransferase at replication forks and is needed to prevent replication-associated DNA damage. Our data reveal how the replication checkpoint preserves genome integrity, provide insights into the mechanism of action of ATR inhibitors, and will be a useful resource for replication, DNA repair, and chromatin investigators.
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Loss of tumour suppressor PTEN expression in renal injury initiates SMAD3- and p53-dependent fibrotic responses.
Samarakoon R, Helo S, Dobberfuhl AD, Khakoo NS, Falke L, Overstreet JM, Goldschmeding R, Higgins PJ
(2015) J Pathol 236: 421-32
MeSH Terms: Animals, Apoptosis, Aristolochic Acids, Cell Cycle Checkpoints, Cell Line, Cell Proliferation, Disease Models, Animal, Enzyme Inhibitors, Fibrosis, Gene Expression Regulation, Humans, Kidney Diseases, Kidney Tubules, Male, Mice, Inbred C57BL, PTEN Phosphohydrolase, Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1, RNA Interference, Signal Transduction, Smad3 Protein, Streptozocin, Transfection, Transforming Growth Factor beta1, Tumor Suppressor Protein p53, Ureteral Obstruction
Show Abstract · Added April 19, 2016
Deregulation of the tumour suppressor PTEN occurs in lung and skin fibrosis and diabetic and ischaemic renal injury. However, the potential role of PTEN and associated mechanisms in the progression of kidney fibrosis is unknown. Tubular and interstitial PTEN expression was dramatically decreased in several models of renal injury, including aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN), streptozotocin (STZ)-mediated injury and ureteral unilateral obstruction (UUO), correlating with Akt, p53 and SMAD3 activation and fibrosis. Stable silencing of PTEN in HK-2 human tubular epithelial cells induced dedifferentiation and CTGF, PAI-1, vimentin, α-SMA and fibronectin expression, compared to HK-2 cells expressing control shRNA. Furthermore, PTEN knockdown stimulated Akt, SMAD3 and p53(Ser15) phosphorylation, with an accompanying decrease in population density and an increase in epithelial G1 cell cycle arrest. SMAD3 or p53 gene silencing or pharmacological blockade partially suppressed fibrotic gene expression and relieved growth inhibition orchestrated by deficiency or inhibition of PTEN. Similarly, shRNA suppression of PAI-1 rescued the PTEN loss-associated epithelial proliferative arrest. Moreover, TGFβ1-initiated fibrotic gene expression is further enhanced by PTEN depletion. Combined TGFβ1 treatment and PTEN silencing potentiated epithelial cell death via p53-dependent pathways. Thus, PTEN loss initiates tubular dysfunction via SMAD3- and p53-mediated fibrotic gene induction, with accompanying PAI-1-dependent proliferative arrest, and cooperates with TGFβ1 to induce the expression of profibrotic genes and tubular apoptosis.
Copyright © 2015 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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25 MeSH Terms
In aged mice, low surrogate light chain promotes pro-B-cell apoptotic resistance, compromises the PreBCR checkpoint, and favors generation of autoreactive, phosphorylcholine-specific B cells.
Ratliff M, Alter S, McAvoy K, Frasca D, Wright JA, Zinkel SS, Khan WN, Blomberg BB, Riley RL
(2015) Aging Cell 14: 382-90
MeSH Terms: Animals, Apoptosis, Cell Cycle Checkpoints, Cell Differentiation, Immunoglobulin Light Chains, Surrogate, Lymphocyte Activation, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Phosphorylcholine, Precursor Cells, B-Lymphoid
Show Abstract · Added April 25, 2016
In aged mice, new B-cell development is diminished and the antibody repertoire becomes more autoreactive. Our studies suggest that (i) apoptosis contributes to reduced B lymphopoiesis in old age and preferentially eliminates those B-cell precursors with higher levels of the surrogate light chain (SLC) proteins (λ5/VpreB) and (ii) λ5(low) B-cell precursors generate new B cells which show increased reactivity to the self-antigen/bacterial antigen phosphorylcholine (PC). Pro-B cells in old bone marrow as well as pro-B cells from young adult λ5-deficient mice are resistant to cytokine-induced apoptosis (TNFα; TGFβ), indicating that low λ5 expression in pro-B cells is sufficient to cause increased survival. Transfer of TNFα-producing 'age-associated B cells' (ABC; CD21/35(-) CD23(-)) or follicular (FO) B cells from aged mice into RAG-2 KO recipients led to preferential loss of λ5(high) pro-B cells, but retention of λ5(low), apoptosis-resistant pro-B cells. In old mice, there is increased reactivity to PC in both immature bone marrow B cells and mature splenic FO B cells. In young mice, absence of λ5 expression led to a similar increase in PC reactivity among bone marrow and splenic B cells. We propose that in old age, increased apoptosis, mediated in part by TNFα-producing B cells, results in preferential loss of SLC(high) pro-B cells within the bone marrow. Further B-cell development then occurs via an 'SLC(low)' pathway that not only impairs B-cell generation, but promotes autoreactivity within the naïve antibody repertoires in the bone marrow and periphery.
© 2015 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
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9 MeSH Terms
Enforced expression of E47 has differential effects on Lmo2-induced T-cell leukemias.
Goodings C, Tripathi R, Cleveland SM, Elliott N, Guo Y, Shyr Y, Davé UP
(2015) Leuk Res 39: 100-9
MeSH Terms: Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing, Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors, Cell Cycle Checkpoints, Cell Line, Tumor, Cell Transformation, Neoplastic, Humans, LIM Domain Proteins, Leukemia, T-Cell, Protein Multimerization, Proto-Oncogene Proteins, Response Elements, Transcription Factor 3
Show Abstract · Added February 19, 2015
LIM domain only-2 (LMO2) overexpression in T cells induces leukemia but the molecular mechanism remains to be elucidated. In hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, Lmo2 is part of a protein complex comprised of class II basic helix loop helix proteins, Tal1and Lyl1. The latter transcription factors heterodimerize with E2A proteins like E47 and Heb to bind E boxes. LMO2 and TAL1 or LYL1 cooperate to induce T-ALL in mouse models, and are concordantly expressed in human T-ALL. Furthermore, LMO2 cooperates with the loss of E2A suggesting that LMO2 functions by creating a deficiency of E2A. In this study, we tested this hypothesis in Lmo2-induced T-ALL cell lines. We transduced these lines with an E47/estrogen receptor fusion construct that could be forced to homodimerize with 4-hydroxytamoxifen. We discovered that forced homodimerization induced growth arrest in 2 of the 4 lines tested. The lines sensitive to E47 homodimerization accumulated in G1 and had reduced S phase entry. We analyzed the transcriptome of a resistant and a sensitive line to discern the E47 targets responsible for the cellular effects. Our results suggest that E47 has diverse effects in T-ALL but that functional deficiency of E47 is not a universal feature of Lmo2-induced T-ALL.
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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Derivation and validation of cutoffs for clinical use of cell cycle arrest biomarkers.
Hoste EA, McCullough PA, Kashani K, Chawla LS, Joannidis M, Shaw AD, Feldkamp T, Uettwiller-Geiger DL, McCarthy P, Shi J, Walker MG, Kellum JA, Sapphire Investigators
(2014) Nephrol Dial Transplant 29: 2054-61
MeSH Terms: Acute Kidney Injury, Aged, Biomarkers, Cell Cycle Checkpoints, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Proteins, Male, Middle Aged, Predictive Value of Tests, ROC Curve, Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-2
Show Abstract · Added October 20, 2015
BACKGROUND - Acute kidney injury (AKI) remains a deadly condition. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP)-2 and insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)7 are two recently discovered urinary biomarkers for AKI. We now report on the development, and diagnostic accuracy of two clinical cutoffs for a test using these markers.
METHODS - We derived cutoffs based on sensitivity and specificity for prediction of Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes Stages 2-3 AKI within 12 h using data from a previously published multicenter cohort (Sapphire). Next, we verified these cutoffs in a new study (Opal) enrolling 154 critically ill adults from six sites in the USA.
RESULTS - One hundred subjects (14%) in Sapphire and 27 (18%) in Opal met the primary end point. The results of the Opal study replicated those of Sapphire. Relative risk (95% CI) in both studies for subjects testing at ≤0.3 versus >0.3-2 were 4.7 (1.5-16) and 4.4 (2.5-8.7), or 12 (4.2-40) and 18 (10-37) for ≤0.3 versus >2. For the 0.3 cutoff, sensitivity was 89% in both studies, and specificity 50 and 53%. For 2.0, sensitivity was 42 and 44%, and specificity 95 and 90%.
CONCLUSIONS - Urinary [TIMP-2]•[IGFBP7] values of 0.3 or greater identify patients at high risk and those >2 at highest risk for AKI and provide new information to support clinical decision-making.
CLINICAL TRIALS REGISTRATION - Clintrials.gov # NCT01209169 (Sapphire) and NCT01846884 (Opal).
© The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA.
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Mutation of serine 1333 in the ATR HEAT repeats creates a hyperactive kinase.
Luzwick JW, Nam EA, Zhao R, Cortez D
(2014) PLoS One 9: e99397
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Amino Acid Substitution, Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated Proteins, Carrier Proteins, Checkpoint Kinase 1, DNA Replication, DNA-Binding Proteins, G2 Phase Cell Cycle Checkpoints, HCT116 Cells, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Hydroxyurea, Molecular Sequence Data, Nuclear Proteins, Phosphorylation, Protein Binding, Protein Kinases, Protein Structure, Secondary, Radiation, Ionizing, Serine, Signal Transduction, Ultraviolet Rays
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
Subcellular localization, protein interactions, and post-translational modifications regulate the DNA damage response kinases ATR, ATM, and DNA-PK. During an analysis of putative ATR phosphorylation sites, we found that a single mutation at S1333 creates a hyperactive kinase. In vitro and in cells, mutation of S1333 to alanine (S1333A-ATR) causes elevated levels of kinase activity with and without the addition of the protein activator TOPBP1. S1333 mutations to glycine, arginine, or lysine also create a hyperactive kinase, while mutation to aspartic acid decreases ATR activity. S1333A-ATR maintains the G2 checkpoint and promotes completion of DNA replication after transient exposure to replication stress but the less active kinase, S1333D-ATR, has modest defects in both of these functions. While we find no evidence that S1333 is phosphorylated in cultured cells, our data indicate that small changes in the HEAT repeats can have large effects on kinase activity. These mutants may serve as useful tools for future studies of the ATR pathway.
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22 MeSH Terms
The Mdm network and its regulation of p53 activities: a rheostat of cancer risk.
Eischen CM, Lozano G
(2014) Hum Mutat 35: 728-37
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Cycle Checkpoints, Cell Death, Cell Proliferation, Humans, Mice, Neoplasms, Nuclear Proteins, Proto-Oncogene Proteins, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-mdm2, Risk Factors, Transcription, Genetic, Tumor Suppressor Protein p53
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
The potent transcriptional activity of p53 (Trp53, TP53) must be kept in check for normal cell growth and survival. Tumors, which drastically deviate from these parameters, have evolved multiple mechanisms to inactivate TP53, the most prevalent of which is the emergence of TP53 missense mutations, some of which have gain-of-function activities. Another important mechanism by which tumors bypass TP53 functions is via increased levels of two TP53 inhibitors, MDM2, and MDM4. Studies in humans and in mice reveal the complexity of TP53 regulation and the exquisite sensitivity of this pathway to small changes in regulation. Here, we summarize the factors that impinge on TP53 activity and thus cell death/arrest or tumor development.
© 2014 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.
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