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Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Small and Large Extracellular Vesicles (EVs) Reveals Enrichment of Adhesion Proteins in Small EVs.
Jimenez L, Yu H, McKenzie AJ, Franklin JL, Patton JG, Liu Q, Weaver AM
(2019) J Proteome Res 18: 947-959
MeSH Terms: Cell Adhesion, Cell Adhesion Molecules, Cell Line, Tumor, Chromatography, Liquid, Exosomes, Extracellular Vesicles, Humans, Particle Size, Proteomics, Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are important mediators of cell-cell communication due to their cargo content of proteins, lipids, and RNAs. We previously reported that small EVs (SEVs) called exosomes promote directed and random cell motility, invasion, and serum-independent growth. In contrast, larger EVs (LEVs) were not active in those assays, but might have unique functional properties. In order to identify protein cargos that may contribute to different functions of SEVs and LEVs, we used isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-liquid chromatography (LC) tandem mass spectrometry (MS) on EVs isolated from a colon cancer cell line. Bioinformatics analyses revealed that SEVs are enriched in proteins associated with cell-cell junctions, cell-matrix adhesion, exosome biogenesis machinery, and various signaling pathways. In contrast, LEVs are enriched in proteins associated with ribosome and RNA biogenesis, processing, and metabolism. Western blot analysis of EVs purified from two different cancer cell types confirmed the enrichment of cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesion proteins in SEVs. Consistent with those data, we found that cells exhibit enhanced adhesion to surfaces coated with SEVs compared to an equal protein concentration of LEVs. These data suggest that a major function of SEVs is to promote cellular adhesion.
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10 MeSH Terms
Blood Vessel Epicardial Substance (BVES) in junctional signaling and cancer.
Parang B, Thompson JJ, Williams CS
(2018) Tissue Barriers 6: 1-12
MeSH Terms: Animals, Carcinogenesis, Cell Adhesion Molecules, Humans, Membrane Proteins, Muscle Proteins, Neoplasms, Signal Transduction, Tight Junctions
Show Abstract · Added April 15, 2019
Blood vessel epicardial substance (BVES) is a tight-junction associated protein that was originally discovered from a cDNA screen of the developing heart. Research over the last decade has shown that not only is BVES is expressed in cardiac and skeletal tissue, but BVES is also is expressed throughout the gastrointestinal epithelium. Mice lacking BVES sustain worse intestinal injury and inflammation. Furthermore, BVES is suppressed in gastrointestinal cancers, and mouse modeling has shown that loss of BVES promotes tumor formation. Recent work from multiple laboratories has revealed that BVES can regulate several molecular pathways, including cAMP, WNT, and promoting the degradation of the oncogene, c-Myc. This review will summarize our current understanding of how BVES regulates the intestinal epithelium and discuss how BVES functions at the molecular level to preserve epithelial phenotypes and suppress tumorigenesis.
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9 MeSH Terms
Molecular and epidemiologic characterization of Wilms tumor from Baghdad, Iraq.
Phelps HM, Al-Jadiry MF, Corbitt NM, Pierce JM, Li B, Wei Q, Flores RR, Correa H, Uccini S, Frangoul H, Alsaadawi AR, Al-Badri SAF, Al-Darraji AF, Al-Saeed RM, Al-Hadad SA, Lovvorn Iii HN
(2018) World J Pediatr 14: 585-593
MeSH Terms: Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing, Child, Preschool, DNA Topoisomerases, Type II, Female, Homeodomain Proteins, Humans, Immunohistochemistry, Infant, Insulin-Like Growth Factor II, Iraq, Kidney Neoplasms, Male, Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction, Mutation, N-Myc Proto-Oncogene Protein, Nerve Tissue Proteins, Neural Cell Adhesion Molecules, Nuclear Proteins, Poly-ADP-Ribose Binding Proteins, Receptors, Retinoic Acid, Sequence Analysis, DNA, Transcription Factors, Tumor Suppressor Protein p53, Tumor Suppressor Proteins, WT1 Proteins, Wilms Tumor, beta Catenin
Show Abstract · Added January 28, 2019
BACKGROUND - Wilms tumor (WT) is the most common childhood kidney cancer worldwide, yet its incidence and clinical behavior vary according to race and access to adequate healthcare resources. To guide and streamline therapy in the war-torn and resource-constrained city of Baghdad, Iraq, we conducted a first-ever molecular analysis of 20 WT specimens to characterize the biological features of this lethal disease within this challenged population.
METHODS - Next-generation sequencing of ten target genes associated with WT development and treatment resistance (WT1, CTNNB1, WTX, IGF2, CITED1, SIX2, p53, N-MYC, CRABP2, and TOP2A) was completed. Immunohistochemistry was performed for 6 marker proteins of WT (WT1, CTNNB1, NCAM, CITED1, SIX2, and p53). Patient outcomes were compiled.
RESULTS - Mutations were detected in previously described WT "hot spots" (e.g., WT1 and CTNNB1) as well as novel loci that may be unique to the Iraqi population. Immunohistochemistry showed expression domains most typical of blastemal-predominant WT. Remarkably, despite the challenges facing families and care providers, only one child, with combined WT1 and CTNNB1 mutations, was confirmed dead from disease. Median clinical follow-up was 40.5 months (range 6-78 months).
CONCLUSIONS - These data suggest that WT biology within a population of Iraqi children manifests features both similar to and unique from disease variants in other regions of the world. These observations will help to risk stratify WT patients living in this difficult environment to more or less intensive therapies and to focus treatment on cell-specific targets.
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27 MeSH Terms
BVES is required for maintenance of colonic epithelial integrity in experimental colitis by modifying intestinal permeability.
Choksi YA, Reddy VK, Singh K, Barrett CW, Short SP, Parang B, Keating CE, Thompson JJ, Verriere TG, Brown RE, Piazuelo MB, Bader DM, Washington MK, Mittal MK, Brand T, Gobert AP, Coburn LA, Wilson KT, Williams CS
(2018) Mucosal Immunol 11: 1363-1374
MeSH Terms: Adult, Animals, Caco-2 Cells, Cell Adhesion Molecules, Cell Line, Cell Line, Tumor, Citrobacter rodentium, Coculture Techniques, Colitis, Ulcerative, Colon, Dextran Sulfate, Epithelial Cells, Escherichia coli, Female, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Intestinal Absorption, Intestinal Mucosa, Male, Membrane Proteins, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Middle Aged, Muscle Proteins, Permeability, RNA, Messenger, Signal Transduction, Tight Junctions
Show Abstract · Added June 23, 2018
Blood vessel epicardial substance (BVES), or POPDC1, is a tight junction-associated transmembrane protein that modulates epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) via junctional signaling pathways. There have been no in vivo studies investigating the role of BVES in colitis. We hypothesized that BVES is critical for maintaining colonic epithelial integrity. At baseline, Bves mouse colons demonstrate increased crypt height, elevated proliferation, decreased apoptosis, altered intestinal lineage allocation, and dysregulation of tight junctions with functional deficits in permeability and altered intestinal immunity. Bves mice inoculated with Citrobacter rodentium had greater colonic injury, increased colonic and mesenteric lymph node bacterial colonization, and altered immune responses after infection. We propose that increased bacterial colonization and translocation result in amplified immune responses and worsened injury. Similarly, dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) treatment resulted in greater histologic injury in Bves mice. Two different human cell lines (Caco2 and HEK293Ts) co-cultured with enteropathogenic E. coli showed increased attaching/effacing lesions in the absence of BVES. Finally, BVES mRNA levels were reduced in human ulcerative colitis (UC) biopsy specimens. Collectively, these studies suggest that BVES plays a protective role both in ulcerative and infectious colitis and identify BVES as a critical protector of colonic mucosal integrity.
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28 MeSH Terms
Structure-function characterization of three human antibodies targeting the vaccinia virus adhesion molecule D8.
Matho MH, Schlossman A, Gilchuk IM, Miller G, Mikulski Z, Hupfer M, Wang J, Bitra A, Meng X, Xiang Y, Kaever T, Doukov T, Ley K, Crotty S, Peters B, Hsieh-Wilson LC, Crowe JE, Zajonc DM
(2018) J Biol Chem 293: 390-401
MeSH Terms: Antibodies, Antibodies, Monoclonal, Antibodies, Neutralizing, Antibodies, Viral, Antibody Formation, Antigens, Viral, Cell Adhesion Molecules, Crystallography, X-Ray, Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay, Epitopes, Humans, Neutralization Tests, Protein Binding, Structure-Activity Relationship, Vaccinia virus, Viral Envelope Proteins
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Vaccinia virus (VACV) envelope protein D8 is one of three glycosaminoglycan adhesion molecules and binds to the linear polysaccharide chondroitin sulfate (CS). D8 is also a target for neutralizing antibody responses that are elicited by the smallpox vaccine, which has enabled the first eradication of a human viral pathogen and is a useful model for studying antibody responses. However, to date, VACV epitopes targeted by human antibodies have not been characterized at atomic resolution. Here, we characterized the binding properties of several human anti-D8 antibodies and determined the crystal structures of three VACV-mAb variants, VACV-66, VACV-138, and VACV-304, separately bound to D8. Although all these antibodies bound D8 with high affinity and were moderately neutralizing in the presence of complement, VACV-138 and VACV-304 also fully blocked D8 binding to CS-A, the low affinity ligand for D8. VACV-138 also abrogated D8 binding to the high-affinity ligand CS-E, but we observed residual CS-E binding was observed in the presence of VACV-304. Analysis of the VACV-138- and VACV-304-binding sites along the CS-binding crevice of D8, combined with different efficiencies of blocking D8 adhesion to CS-A and CS-E allowed us to propose that D8 has a high- and low-affinity CS-binding region within its central crevice. The crevice is amenable to protein engineering to further enhance both specificity and affinity of binding to CS-E. Finally, a wild-type D8 tetramer specifically bound to structures within the developing glomeruli of the kidney, which express CS-E. We propose that through structure-based protein engineering, an improved D8 tetramer could be used as a potential diagnostic tool to detect expression of CS-E, which is a possible biomarker for ovarian cancer.
© 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.
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16 MeSH Terms
A multi-stage genome-wide association study of uterine fibroids in African Americans.
Hellwege JN, Jeff JM, Wise LA, Gallagher CS, Wellons M, Hartmann KE, Jones SF, Torstenson ES, Dickinson S, Ruiz-Narváez EA, Rohland N, Allen A, Reich D, Tandon A, Pasaniuc B, Mancuso N, Im HK, Hinds DA, Palmer JR, Rosenberg L, Denny JC, Roden DM, Stewart EA, Morton CC, Kenny EE, Edwards TL, Velez Edwards DR
(2017) Hum Genet 136: 1363-1373
MeSH Terms: Adult, African Americans, Alleles, Cell Adhesion Molecules, Female, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Gene Frequency, Genetic Loci, Genome-Wide Association Study, Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors, Humans, Leiomyoma, Middle Aged, Neoplasm Proteins, Risk Factors, Uterine Neoplasms
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Uterine fibroids are benign tumors of the uterus affecting up to 77% of women by menopause. They are the leading indication for hysterectomy, and account for $34 billion annually in the United States. Race/ethnicity and age are the strongest known risk factors. African American (AA) women have higher prevalence, earlier onset, and larger and more numerous fibroids than European American women. We conducted a multi-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS) of fibroid risk among AA women followed by in silico genetically predicted gene expression profiling of top hits. In Stage 1, cases and controls were confirmed by pelvic imaging, genotyped and imputed to 1000 Genomes. Stage 2 used self-reported fibroid and GWAS data from 23andMe, Inc. and the Black Women's Health Study. Associations with fibroid risk were modeled using logistic regression adjusted for principal components, followed by meta-analysis of results. We observed a significant association among 3399 AA cases and 4764 AA controls at rs739187 (risk-allele frequency = 0.27) in CYTH4 (OR (95% confidence interval) = 1.23 (1.16-1.30), p value = 7.82 × 10). Evaluation of the genetic association results with MetaXcan identified lower predicted gene expression of CYTH4 in thyroid tissue as significantly associated with fibroid risk (p value = 5.86 × 10). In this first multi-stage GWAS for fibroids among AA women, we identified a novel risk locus for fibroids within CYTH4 that impacts gene expression in thyroid and has potential biological relevance for fibroids.
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4 Members
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16 MeSH Terms
CD318 is a ligand for CD6.
Enyindah-Asonye G, Li Y, Ruth JH, Spassov DS, Hebron KE, Zijlstra A, Moasser MM, Wang B, Singer NG, Cui H, Ohara RA, Rasmussen SM, Fox DA, Lin F
(2017) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 114: E6912-E6921
MeSH Terms: A549 Cells, Animals, Antigens, CD, Antigens, Differentiation, T-Lymphocyte, Antigens, Neoplasm, Arthritis, Rheumatoid, Cell Adhesion Molecules, Cell Line, Cell Line, Tumor, Encephalomyelitis, Autoimmune, Experimental, Humans, Ligands, Membrane Glycoproteins, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Neoplasm Proteins, Synovial Membrane, T-Lymphocytes
Show Abstract · Added March 22, 2018
It has been proposed that CD6, an important regulator of T cells, functions by interacting with its currently identified ligand, CD166, but studies performed during the treatment of autoimmune conditions suggest that the CD6-CD166 interaction might not account for important functions of CD6 in autoimmune diseases. The antigen recognized by mAb 3A11 has been proposed as a new CD6 ligand distinct from CD166, yet the identity of it is hitherto unknown. We have identified this CD6 ligand as CD318, a cell surface protein previously found to be present on various epithelial cells and many tumor cells. We found that, like CD6 knockout (KO) mice, CD318 KO mice are also protected in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. In humans, we found that CD318 is highly expressed in synovial tissues and participates in CD6-dependent adhesion of T cells to synovial fibroblasts. In addition, soluble CD318 is chemoattractive to T cells and levels of soluble CD318 are selectively and significantly elevated in the synovial fluid from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and juvenile inflammatory arthritis. These results establish CD318 as a ligand of CD6 and a potential target for the diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis and inflammatory arthritis.
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18 MeSH Terms
Identification of Proteomic Features To Distinguish Benign Pulmonary Nodules from Lung Adenocarcinoma.
Codreanu SG, Hoeksema MD, Slebos RJC, Zimmerman LJ, Rahman SMJ, Li M, Chen SC, Chen H, Eisenberg R, Liebler DC, Massion PP
(2017) J Proteome Res 16: 3266-3276
MeSH Terms: 5-Lipoxygenase-Activating Proteins, Adenocarcinoma, Adenocarcinoma of Lung, Adult, Aged, Antigens, CD, Arachidonate 5-Lipoxygenase, Biomarkers, Tumor, CD11 Antigens, Cell Adhesion Molecules, Diagnosis, Differential, Female, GPI-Linked Proteins, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Glucose Transporter Type 3, Humans, Integrin alpha Chains, Lung Neoplasms, Male, Middle Aged, Neoplasm Proteins, Proteomics, Respiratory Mucosa, Solitary Pulmonary Nodule, Tandem Mass Spectrometry, Tissue Array Analysis, Transcriptome
Show Abstract · Added January 29, 2018
We hypothesized that distinct protein expression features of benign and malignant pulmonary nodules may reveal novel candidate biomarkers for the early detection of lung cancer. We performed proteome profiling by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to characterize 34 resected benign lung nodules, 24 untreated lung adenocarcinomas (ADCs), and biopsies of bronchial epithelium. Group comparisons identified 65 proteins that differentiate nodules from ADCs and normal bronchial epithelium and 66 proteins that differentiate ADCs from nodules and normal bronchial epithelium. We developed a multiplexed parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) assay to quantify a subset of 43 of these candidate biomarkers in an independent cohort of 20 benign nodules, 21 ADCs, and 20 normal bronchial biopsies. PRM analyses confirmed significant nodule-specific abundance of 10 proteins including ALOX5, ALOX5AP, CCL19, CILP1, COL5A2, ITGB2, ITGAX, PTPRE, S100A12, and SLC2A3 and significant ADC-specific abundance of CEACAM6, CRABP2, LAD1, PLOD2, and TMEM110-MUSTN1. Immunohistochemistry analyses for seven selected proteins performed on an independent set of tissue microarrays confirmed nodule-specific expression of ALOX5, ALOX5AP, ITGAX, and SLC2A3 and cancer-specific expression of CEACAM6. These studies illustrate the value of global and targeted proteomics in a systematic process to identify and qualify candidate biomarkers for noninvasive molecular diagnosis of lung cancer.
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27 MeSH Terms
BVES regulates c-Myc stability via PP2A and suppresses colitis-induced tumourigenesis.
Parang B, Kaz AM, Barrett CW, Short SP, Ning W, Keating CE, Mittal MK, Naik RD, Washington MK, Revetta FL, Smith JJ, Chen X, Wilson KT, Brand T, Bader DM, Tansey WP, Chen R, Brentnall TA, Grady WM, Williams CS
(2017) Gut 66: 852-862
MeSH Terms: Animals, Biomarkers, Tumor, Caco-2 Cells, Carcinogenesis, Cell Adhesion Molecules, Colitis, Colitis, Ulcerative, Colon, Colonic Neoplasms, DNA Methylation, Dextran Sulfate, Down-Regulation, Female, Gene Expression Profiling, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Male, Membrane Proteins, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Muscle Proteins, Promoter Regions, Genetic, Protein Phosphatase 2, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-myc, RNA, Messenger, Wnt Signaling Pathway
Show Abstract · Added April 15, 2017
OBJECTIVE - Blood vessel epicardial substance (BVES) is a tight junction-associated protein that regulates epithelial-mesenchymal states and is underexpressed in epithelial malignancy. However, the functional impact of BVES loss on tumourigenesis is unknown. Here we define the in vivo role of BVES in colitis-associated cancer (CAC), its cellular function and its relevance to patients with IBD.
DESIGN - We determined promoter methylation status using an Infinium HumanMethylation450 array screen of patients with UC with and without CAC. We also measured mRNA levels in a tissue microarray consisting of normal colons and CAC samples. and wild-type mice (controls) were administered azoxymethane (AOM) and dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) to induce tumour formation. Last, we used a yeast two-hybrid screen to identify BVES interactors and performed mechanistic studies in multiple cell lines to define how BVES reduces c-Myc levels.
RESULTS - mRNA was reduced in tumours from patients with CAC via promoter hypermethylation. Importantly, promoter hypermethylation was concurrently present in distant non-malignant-appearing mucosa. As seen in human patients, was underexpressed in experimental inflammatory carcinogenesis, and mice had increased tumour multiplicity and degree of dysplasia after AOM/DSS administration. Molecular analysis of tumours revealed Wnt activation and increased c-Myc levels. Mechanistically, we identified a new signalling pathway whereby BVES interacts with PR61α, a protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit, to mediate c-Myc destruction.
CONCLUSION - Loss of BVES promotes inflammatory tumourigenesis through dysregulation of Wnt signalling and the oncogene c-Myc. promoter methylation status may serve as a CAC biomarker.
Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.
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4 Members
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26 MeSH Terms
The Par3 polarity protein is an exocyst receptor essential for mammary cell survival.
Ahmed SM, Macara IG
(2017) Nat Commun 8: 14867
MeSH Terms: Animals, Apoptosis, Cadherins, Cell Adhesion Molecules, Cell Line, Cell Polarity, Cell Survival, Enzyme Activation, Epithelial Cells, Female, Gene Knockdown Techniques, Golgi Apparatus, Humans, Lysine, Mammary Glands, Animal, Models, Biological, PTEN Phosphohydrolase, Phosphatidylinositol Phosphates, Phosphorylation, Protein Domains, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt, Vesicular Transport Proteins, rab GTP-Binding Proteins
Show Abstract · Added April 26, 2017
The exocyst is an essential component of the secretory pathway required for delivery of basolateral proteins to the plasma membranes of epithelial cells. Delivery occurs adjacent to tight junctions (TJ), suggesting that it recognizes a receptor at this location. However, no such receptor has been identified. The Par3 polarity protein associates with TJs but has no known function in membrane traffic. We now show that, unexpectedly, Par3 is essential for mammary cell survival. Par3 silencing causes apoptosis, triggered by phosphoinositide trisphosphate depletion and decreased Akt phosphorylation, resulting from failure of the exocyst to deliver basolateral proteins to the cortex. A small region of PAR3 binds directly to Exo70 and is sufficient for exocyst docking, membrane-protein delivery and cell survival. PAR3 lacking this domain can associate with the cortex but cannot support exocyst function. We conclude that Par3 is the long-sought exocyst receptor required for targeted membrane-protein delivery.
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23 MeSH Terms