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Manganese Detoxification by MntE Is Critical for Resistance to Oxidative Stress and Virulence of .
Grunenwald CM, Choby JE, Juttukonda LJ, Beavers WN, Weiss A, Torres VJ, Skaar EP
(2019) mBio 10:
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cation Transport Proteins, Disease Models, Animal, Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial, Homeostasis, Iron, Manganese, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Microbial Viability, Oxidative Stress, Staphylococcal Infections, Staphylococcus aureus, Transcription Factors, Transcription, Genetic, Virulence
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
Manganese (Mn) is an essential micronutrient critical for the pathogenesis of , a significant cause of human morbidity and mortality. Paradoxically, excess Mn is toxic; therefore, maintenance of intracellular Mn homeostasis is required for survival. Here we describe a Mn exporter in , MntE, which is a member of the cation diffusion facilitator (CDF) protein family and conserved among Gram-positive pathogens. Upregulation of transcription in response to excess Mn is dependent on the presence of MntR, a transcriptional repressor of the Mn uptake system. Inactivation of or leads to reduced growth in media supplemented with Mn, demonstrating MntE is required for detoxification of excess Mn. Inactivation of results in elevated levels of intracellular Mn, but reduced intracellular iron (Fe) levels, supporting the hypothesis that MntE functions as a Mn efflux pump and Mn efflux influences Fe homeostasis. Strains inactivated for are more sensitive to the oxidants NaOCl and paraquat, indicating Mn homeostasis is critical for resisting oxidative stress. Furthermore, and are required for full virulence of during infection, suggesting experiences Mn toxicity Combined, these data support a model in which MntR controls Mn homeostasis by balancing transcriptional repression of and induction of , both of which are critical for pathogenesis. Thus, Mn efflux contributes to bacterial survival and virulence during infection, establishing MntE as a potential antimicrobial target and expanding our understanding of Mn homeostasis. Manganese (Mn) is generally viewed as a critical nutrient that is beneficial to pathogenic bacteria due to its function as an enzymatic cofactor and its capability of acting as an antioxidant; yet paradoxically, high concentrations of this transition metal can be toxic. In this work, we demonstrate utilizes the cation diffusion facilitator (CDF) family protein MntE to alleviate Mn toxicity through efflux of excess Mn. Inactivation of leads to a significant reduction in resistance to oxidative stress and mediated mortality within a mouse model of systemic infection. These results highlight the importance of MntE-mediated Mn detoxification in intracellular Mn homeostasis, resistance to oxidative stress, and virulence. Therefore, this establishes MntE as a potential target for development of anti- therapeutics.
Copyright © 2019 Grunenwald et al.
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15 MeSH Terms
Molecular Basis for the Evolution of Species-Specific Hemoglobin Capture by Staphylococcus aureus.
Choby JE, Buechi HB, Farrand AJ, Skaar EP, Barber MF
(2018) mBio 9:
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cation Transport Proteins, Evolution, Molecular, Hemoglobins, Host-Pathogen Interactions, Iron, Mutation, Primates, Protein Binding, Species Specificity, Staphylococcus aureus
Show Abstract · Added April 7, 2019
Metals are a limiting resource for pathogenic bacteria and must be scavenged from host proteins. Hemoglobin provides the most abundant source of iron in the human body and is required by several pathogens to cause invasive disease. However, the consequences of hemoglobin evolution for bacterial nutrient acquisition remain unclear. Here we show that the α- and β-globin genes exhibit strikingly parallel signatures of adaptive evolution across simian primates. Rapidly evolving sites in hemoglobin correspond to binding interfaces of IsdB, a bacterial hemoglobin receptor harbored by pathogenic Using an evolution-guided experimental approach, we demonstrate that the divergence between primates and staphylococcal isolates governs hemoglobin recognition and bacterial growth. The reintroduction of putative adaptive mutations in α- or β-globin proteins was sufficient to impair binding, providing a mechanism for the evolution of disease resistance. These findings suggest that bacterial hemoprotein capture has driven repeated evolutionary conflicts with hemoglobin during primate descent. During infection, bacteria must steal metals, including iron, from the host tissue. Therefore, pathogenic bacteria have evolved metal acquisition systems to overcome the elaborate processes mammals use to withhold metal from pathogens. uses IsdB, a hemoglobin receptor, to thieve iron-containing heme from hemoglobin within human blood. We find evidence that primate hemoglobin has undergone rapid evolution at protein surfaces contacted by IsdB. Additionally, variation in the hemoglobin sequences among primates, or variation in IsdB of related staphylococci, reduces bacterial hemoglobin capture. Together, these data suggest that has evolved to recognize human hemoglobin in the face of rapid evolution at the IsdB binding interface, consistent with repeated evolutionary conflicts in the battle for iron during host-pathogen interactions.
Copyright © 2018 Choby et al.
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11 MeSH Terms
Large-scale whole-exome sequencing association studies identify rare functional variants influencing serum urate levels.
Tin A, Li Y, Brody JA, Nutile T, Chu AY, Huffman JE, Yang Q, Chen MH, Robinson-Cohen C, Macé A, Liu J, Demirkan A, Sorice R, Sedaghat S, Swen M, Yu B, Ghasemi S, Teumer A, Vollenweider P, Ciullo M, Li M, Uitterlinden AG, Kraaij R, Amin N, van Rooij J, Kutalik Z, Dehghan A, McKnight B, van Duijn CM, Morrison A, Psaty BM, Boerwinkle E, Fox CS, Woodward OM, Köttgen A
(2018) Nat Commun 9: 4228
MeSH Terms: Exome, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Glucose Transport Proteins, Facilitative, Humans, Kidney Function Tests, Meta-Analysis as Topic, Organic Anion Transporters, Organic Cation Transport Proteins, Protein Structure, Secondary, Uric Acid
Show Abstract · Added January 3, 2019
Elevated serum urate levels can cause gout, an excruciating disease with suboptimal treatment. Previous GWAS identified common variants with modest effects on serum urate. Here we report large-scale whole-exome sequencing association studies of serum urate and kidney function among ≤19,517 European ancestry and African-American individuals. We identify aggregate associations of low-frequency damaging variants in the urate transporters SLC22A12 (URAT1; p = 1.3 × 10) and SLC2A9 (p = 4.5 × 10). Gout risk in rare SLC22A12 variant carriers is halved (OR = 0.5, p = 4.9 × 10). Selected rare variants in SLC22A12 are validated in transport studies, confirming three as loss-of-function (R325W, R405C, and T467M) and illustrating the therapeutic potential of the new URAT1-blocker lesinurad. In SLC2A9, mapping of rare variants of large effects onto the predicted protein structure reveals new residues that may affect urate binding. These findings provide new insights into the genetic architecture of serum urate, and highlight molecular targets in SLC22A12 and SLC2A9 for lowering serum urate and preventing gout.
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MeSH Terms
Mechanism of Hyperkalemia-Induced Metabolic Acidosis.
Harris AN, Grimm PR, Lee HW, Delpire E, Fang L, Verlander JW, Welling PA, Weiner ID
(2018) J Am Soc Nephrol 29: 1411-1425
MeSH Terms: Acidosis, Aldosterone, Amiloride, Ammonia, Animals, Cation Transport Proteins, Diuretics, Glutaminase, Hydrochlorothiazide, Hydrogen-Ion Concentration, Hyperkalemia, Kidney Tubules, Distal, Kidney Tubules, Proximal, Membrane Glycoproteins, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases, Proton-Translocating ATPases, Urinalysis
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2018
Hyperkalemia in association with metabolic acidosis that are out of proportion to changes in glomerular filtration rate defines type 4 renal tubular acidosis (RTA), the most common RTA observed, but the molecular mechanisms underlying the associated metabolic acidosis are incompletely understood. We sought to determine whether hyperkalemia directly causes metabolic acidosis and, if so, the mechanisms through which this occurs. We studied a genetic model of hyperkalemia that results from early distal convoluted tubule (DCT)-specific overexpression of constitutively active Ste20/SPS1-related proline-alanine-rich kinase (DCT-CA-SPAK). DCT-CA-SPAK mice developed hyperkalemia in association with metabolic acidosis and suppressed ammonia excretion; however, titratable acid excretion and urine pH were unchanged compared with those in wild-type mice. Abnormal ammonia excretion in DCT-CA-SPAK mice associated with decreased proximal tubule expression of the ammonia-generating enzymes phosphate-dependent glutaminase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and overexpression of the ammonia-recycling enzyme glutamine synthetase. These mice also had decreased expression of the ammonia transporter family member Rhcg and decreased apical polarization of H-ATPase in the inner stripe of the outer medullary collecting duct. Correcting the hyperkalemia by treatment with hydrochlorothiazide corrected the metabolic acidosis, increased ammonia excretion, and normalized ammoniagenic enzyme and Rhcg expression in DCT-CA-SPAK mice. In wild-type mice, induction of hyperkalemia by administration of the epithelial sodium channel blocker benzamil caused hyperkalemia and suppressed ammonia excretion. Hyperkalemia decreases proximal tubule ammonia generation and collecting duct ammonia transport, leading to impaired ammonia excretion that causes metabolic acidosis.
Copyright © 2018 by the American Society of Nephrology.
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19 MeSH Terms
In vivo bioluminescence imaging of labile iron accumulation in a murine model of infection.
Aron AT, Heffern MC, Lonergan ZR, Vander Wal MN, Blank BR, Spangler B, Zhang Y, Park HM, Stahl A, Renslo AR, Skaar EP, Chang CJ
(2017) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 114: 12669-12674
MeSH Terms: 2,2'-Dipyridyl, Acinetobacter Infections, Acinetobacter baumannii, Anemia, Iron-Deficiency, Animals, Cation Transport Proteins, Cations, Divalent, Disease Models, Animal, Ferric Compounds, Firefly Luciferin, Fluorescent Dyes, Gene Expression Regulation, Hepcidins, Homeostasis, Iron, Iron Overload, Iron Regulatory Protein 1, Iron Regulatory Protein 2, Luminescent Measurements, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, Quaternary Ammonium Compounds, Receptors, Transferrin, Signal Transduction, Transferrin
Show Abstract · Added March 15, 2018
Iron is an essential metal for all organisms, yet disruption of its homeostasis, particularly in labile forms that can contribute to oxidative stress, is connected to diseases ranging from infection to cancer to neurodegeneration. Iron deficiency is also among the most common nutritional deficiencies worldwide. To advance studies of iron in healthy and disease states, we now report the synthesis and characterization of iron-caged luciferin-1 (ICL-1), a bioluminescent probe that enables longitudinal monitoring of labile iron pools (LIPs) in living animals. ICL-1 utilizes a bioinspired endoperoxide trigger to release d-aminoluciferin for selective reactivity-based detection of Fe with metal and oxidation state specificity. The probe can detect physiological changes in labile Fe levels in live cells and mice experiencing iron deficiency or overload. Application of ICL-1 in a model of systemic bacterial infection reveals increased iron accumulation in infected tissues that accompany transcriptional changes consistent with elevations in both iron acquisition and retention. The ability to assess iron status in living animals provides a powerful technology for studying the contributions of iron metabolism to physiology and pathology.
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25 MeSH Terms
Contribution of Organic Anion-Transporting Polypeptides 1A/1B to Doxorubicin Uptake and Clearance.
Lee HH, Leake BF, Kim RB, Ho RH
(2017) Mol Pharmacol 91: 14-24
MeSH Terms: ATP Binding Cassette Transporter, Subfamily B, Member 1, Animals, Biological Transport, Cell Membrane, Dogs, Doxorubicin, HeLa Cells, Humans, Kinetics, Liver, Liver-Specific Organic Anion Transporter 1, Madin Darby Canine Kidney Cells, Male, Mice, Models, Biological, Mutant Proteins, Organic Anion Transporters, Organic Anion Transporters, Sodium-Independent, Organic Cation Transport Proteins, Rats, Transfection
Show Abstract · Added November 10, 2016
The organic anion-transporting polypeptides represent an important family of drug uptake transporters that mediate the cellular uptake of a broad range of substrates including numerous drugs. Doxorubicin is a highly efficacious and well-established anthracycline chemotherapeutic agent commonly used in the treatment of a wide range of cancers. Although doxorubicin is a known substrate for efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp; MDR1, ABCB1), significantly less is known regarding its interactions with drug uptake transporters. Here, we investigated the role of organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP) transporters to the disposition of doxorubicin. A recombinant vaccinia-based method for expressing uptake transporters in HeLa cells revealed that OATP1A2, but not OATP1B1 or OATP1B3, and the rat ortholog Oatp1a4 were capable of significant doxorubicin uptake. Interestingly, transwell assays using Madin-Darby canine kidney II cell line cells stably expressing specific uptake and/or efflux transporters revealed that OATP1B1, OATP1B3, and OATP1A2, either alone or in combination with MDR1, significantly transported doxorubicin. An assessment of polymorphisms in SLCO1A2 revealed that four variants were associated with significantly impaired doxorubicin transport in vitro. In vivo doxorubicin disposition studies revealed that doxorubicin plasma area under the curve was significantly higher (1.7-fold) in Slco1a/1b versus wild-type mice. The liver-to-plasma ratio of doxorubicin was significantly decreased (2.3-fold) in Slco1a/1b2 mice and clearance was reduced by 40% compared with wild-type mice, suggesting Oatp1b transporters are important for doxorubicin hepatic uptake. In conclusion, we demonstrate important roles for OATP1A/1B in transporter-mediated uptake and disposition of doxorubicin.
Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.
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21 MeSH Terms
Combined Deletion of Slc30a7 and Slc30a8 Unmasks a Critical Role for ZnT8 in Glucose-Stimulated Insulin Secretion.
Syring KE, Boortz KA, Oeser JK, Ustione A, Platt KA, Shadoan MK, McGuinness OP, Piston DW, Powell DR, O'Brien RM
(2016) Endocrinology 157: 4534-4541
MeSH Terms: Animals, Body Weight, Cation Transport Proteins, Female, Glucagon-Secreting Cells, Glucose, Glucose Intolerance, Insulin, Insulin Secretion, Insulin-Secreting Cells, Islets of Langerhans, Male, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Sex Factors, Zinc Transporter 8
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Polymorphisms in the SLC30A8 gene, which encodes the ZnT8 zinc transporter, are associated with altered susceptibility to type 2 diabetes (T2D), and SLC30A8 haploinsufficiency is protective against the development of T2D in obese humans. SLC30A8 is predominantly expressed in pancreatic islet β-cells, but surprisingly, multiple knockout mouse studies have shown little effect of Slc30a8 deletion on glucose tolerance or glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Multiple other Slc30a isoforms are expressed at low levels in pancreatic islets. We hypothesized that functional compensation by the Slc30a7 isoform, which encodes ZnT7, limits the impact of Slc30a8 deletion on islet function. We therefore analyzed the effect of Slc30a7 deletion alone or in combination with Slc30a8 on in vivo glucose metabolism and GSIS in isolated islets. Deletion of Slc30a7 alone had complex effects in vivo, impairing glucose tolerance and reducing the glucose-stimulated increase in plasma insulin levels, hepatic glycogen levels, and pancreatic insulin content. Slc30a7 deletion also affected islet morphology and increased the ratio of islet α- to β-cells. However, deletion of Slc30a7 alone had no effect on GSIS in isolated islets, whereas combined deletion of Slc30a7 and Slc30a8 abolished GSIS. These data demonstrate that the function of ZnT8 in islets can be unmasked by removal of ZnT7 and imply that ZnT8 may affect T2D susceptibility through actions in other tissues where it is expressed at low levels rather than through effects on pancreatic islet function.
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16 MeSH Terms
A Longitudinal HbA1c Model Elucidates Genes Linked to Disease Progression on Metformin.
Goswami S, Yee SW, Xu F, Sridhar SB, Mosley JD, Takahashi A, Kubo M, Maeda S, Davis RL, Roden DM, Hedderson MM, Giacomini KM, Savic RM
(2016) Clin Pharmacol Ther 100: 537-547
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Disease Progression, Female, Glycated Hemoglobin A, Humans, Hypoglycemic Agents, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Membrane Proteins, Metformin, Middle Aged, Nonlinear Dynamics, Organic Cation Transport Proteins, Organic Cation Transporter 2, Pharmacogenomic Variants, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Tumor Suppressor Proteins, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 24, 2020
One-third of type-2 diabetic patients respond poorly to metformin. Despite extensive research, the impact of genetic and nongenetic factors on long-term outcome is unknown. In this study we combine nonlinear mixed effect modeling with computational genetic methodologies to identify predictors of long-term response. In all, 1,056 patients contributed their genetic, demographic, and long-term HbA1c data. The top nine variants (of 12,000 variants in 267 candidate genes) accounted for approximately one-third of the variability in the disease progression parameter. Average serum creatinine level, age, and weight were determinants of symptomatic response; however, explaining negligible variability. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CSMD1 gene (rs2617102, rs2954625) and one SNP in a pharmacologically relevant SLC22A2 gene (rs316009) influenced disease progression, with minor alleles leading to less and more favorable outcomes, respectively. Overall, our study highlights the influence of genetic factors on long-term HbA1c response and provides a computational model, which when validated, may be used to individualize treatment.
© 2016 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.
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21 MeSH Terms
Hepcidin-ferroportin axis controls toll-like receptor 4 dependent macrophage inflammatory responses in human atherosclerotic plaques.
Habib A, Polavarapu R, Karmali V, Guo L, Van Dam R, Cheng Q, Akahori H, Saeed O, Nakano M, Pachura K, Hong CC, Shin E, Kolodgie F, Virmani R, Finn AV
(2015) Atherosclerosis 241: 692-700
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antigens, CD, Antigens, Differentiation, Myelomonocytic, Cation Transport Proteins, Foam Cells, Haptoglobins, Hemoglobins, Hepcidins, Humans, Inflammation, Iron, Lipopolysaccharides, Lipoproteins, LDL, Macrophages, Macrophages, Peritoneal, Male, Membrane Microdomains, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Myeloid Differentiation Factor 88, Plaque, Atherosclerotic, Receptors, Cell Surface, Signal Transduction, Toll-Like Receptor 4, Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Show Abstract · Added July 7, 2015
OBJECTIVES - Toll-like Receptor 4 (TLR4) is implicated in modulating inflammatory cytokines though its role in atherosclerosis remains uncertain. We have recently described a non-foam cell macrophage phenotype driven by ingestion of hemoglobin:haptoglobin complexes (HH), via the scavenger receptor CD163, characterized by reduced inflammatory cytokine production. In this study, we examined the role of iron metabolism in modulating TLR4 signaling in these cells.
METHODS AND RESULTS - Areas in human atherosclerotic plaque with non-foam cell, CD163 positive macrophages demonstrated reduced expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interferon-beta (INF-β) compared to foam cells. Human macrophages differentiated in hemoglobin:haptoglobin (HH) complexes expressed the CD163 positive non-foam cell phenotype and demonstrated significantly less TNF-α and INF-β compared to control macrophages when exposed to oxidized LDL (oxLDL) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS stimulated expression of TNF-α and INF-β could be restored in HH macrophages by pretreatment with hepcidin, an endogenous suppressor of ferroportin1 (FPN), or by genetic suppression of FPN in macrophages derived from myeloid specific FPN knockout mice. LPS stimulated control macrophages demonstrated increase in TLR4 trafficking to lipid rafts; this response was suppressed in HH macrophages but was restored upon pretreatment with hepcidin. Using a pharmacologic hepcidin suppressor, we observed a decrease in cytokine expression and TLR4-lipid raft trafficking in LPS-stimulated in a murine macrophage model.
CONCLUSION - TLR4 dependent macrophage signaling is controlled via hepcidin-ferroportin1 axis by influencing TLR4-lipid raft interactions. Pharmacologic manipulation of iron metabolism may represent a promising approach to limiting TLR4-mediated inflammatory responses.
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
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26 MeSH Terms
Manganese homeostasis and utilization in pathogenic bacteria.
Juttukonda LJ, Skaar EP
(2015) Mol Microbiol 97: 216-28
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bacteria, Bacterial Infections, Cation Transport Proteins, Homeostasis, Host-Pathogen Interactions, Humans, Leukocyte L1 Antigen Complex, Manganese, Membrane Transport Proteins
Show Abstract · Added February 8, 2016
Manganese (Mn) is a required cofactor for all forms of life. Given the importance of Mn to bacteria, the host has devised strategies to sequester Mn from invaders. In the macrophage phagosome, NRAMP1 removes Mn and other essential metals to starve intracellular pathogens; in the extracellular space, calprotectin chelates Mn and Zn. Calprotectin-mediated Mn sequestration is a newly appreciated host defense mechanism, and recent findings are highlighted herein. In order to acquire Mn when extracellular concentrations are low, bacteria have evolved efficient Mn acquisition systems that are under elegant transcriptional control. To counteract Mn overload, some bacteria possess Mn-specific export systems that are important in vivo, presumably for control of intracellular Mn levels. Mn transporters, their transcriptional regulators and some Mn-requiring enzymes are necessary for virulence of certain bacterial pathogens, as revealed by animal models of infection. Furthermore, Mn is an important facet of the cellular response to oxidative stress, a host antibacterial strategy. The battle for Mn between host and pathogen is now appreciated to be a major determinant of the outcome of infection. In this MicroReview, the contribution of Mn to the host-pathogen interaction is reviewed, and key questions are proposed for future study.
© 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
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10 MeSH Terms