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Catheter Insertion and Perioperative Practices Within the ISPD North American Research Consortium.
Wallace EL, Fissell RB, Golper TA, Blake PG, Lewin AM, Oliver MJ, Quinn RR
(2016) Perit Dial Int 36: 382-6
MeSH Terms: Canada, Catheterization, Catheters, Indwelling, Humans, Kidney Failure, Chronic, Laparoscopy, Peritoneal Dialysis, Practice Patterns, Physicians', Quality Improvement, United States
Show Abstract · Added November 5, 2015
UNLABELLED - ♦
BACKGROUND - In general, efforts to standardize care based on group consensus practice guidelines have resulted in lower morbidity and mortality. Although there are published guidelines regarding insertion and perioperative management of peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheters, variation in practice patterns between centers may exist. The objective of this study is to understand variation in PD catheter insertion practices in preparation for conducting future studies. ♦
METHODS - An electronic survey was developed by the research committee of the International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis - North American Research Consortium (ISPD-NARC) to be completed by physicians and nurses involved in PD programs across North America. It consisted of 45 questions related to 1) organizational characteristics; 2) PD catheter insertion practices; 3) current quality-improvement initiatives; and 4) interest in participation in PD studies. Invitation to participate in the survey was given to nephrologists and nurses in centers across Canada and the United States (US) identified by participation in the inaugural meeting of the ISPD-NARC. Descriptive statistics were applied to analyze the data. ♦
RESULTS - Fifty-one ISPD-NARC sites were identified (45% in Canada and 55% in the US) of which 42 responded (82%). Center size varied significantly, with prevalent PD population ranging from 6 - 300 (median: 60) and incident PD patients in the year prior to survey administration ranging from 3 - 180 (median: 20). The majority of centers placed fewer than 19 PD catheters/year, with a range of 0 - 50. Availability of insertion techniques varied significantly, with 83% of centers employing more than 1 insertion technique. Seventy-one percent performed laparoscopic insertion with advanced techniques (omentectomy, omentopexy, and lysis of adhesions), 62% of sites performed open surgical dissection, 10% performed blind insertion via trocar, and 29% performed blind placement with the Seldinger technique. Use of double-cuff catheters was nearly universal, with a near even distribution of catheters with pre-formed bend versus straight inter-cuff segments. There was also variation in the choice of perioperative antibiotics and perioperative flushing practices. Although 86% of centers had quality-improvement initiatives, there was little consensus as to appropriate targets. ♦
CONCLUSIONS - There is marked variability in PD catheter insertion techniques and perioperative management. Large multicenter studies are needed to determine associations between these practices and catheter and patient outcomes. This research could inform future trials and guidelines and improve practice. The ISPD-NARC is a network of PD units that has been formed to conduct multicenter studies in PD.
Copyright © 2016 International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis.
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10 MeSH Terms
The Use of Indwelling Tunneled Pleural Catheters for Recurrent Pleural Effusions in Patients With Hematologic Malignancies: A Multicenter Study.
Gilbert CR, Lee HJ, Skalski JH, Maldonado F, Wahidi M, Choi PJ, Bessich J, Sterman D, Argento AC, Shojaee S, Gorden JA, Wilshire CL, Feller-Kopman D, Ortiz R, Nonyane BAS, Yarmus L
(2015) Chest 148: 752-758
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Catheters, Indwelling, Drainage, Female, Hematologic Neoplasms, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Palliative Care, Pleural Effusion, Malignant, Retrospective Studies, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added July 28, 2015
BACKGROUND - Malignant pleural effusion is a common complication of advanced malignancies. Indwelling tunneled pleural catheter (IPC) placement provides effective palliation but can be associated with complications, including infection. In particular, hematologic malignancy and the associated immunosuppressive treatment regimens may increase infectious complications. This study aimed to review outcomes in patients with hematologic malignancy undergoing IPC placement.
METHODS - A retrospective multicenter study of IPCs placed in patients with hematologic malignancy from January 2009 to December 2013 was performed. Inclusion criteria were recurrent, symptomatic pleural effusion and an underlying diagnosis of hematologic malignancy. Records were reviewed for patient demographics, operative reports, and pathology, cytology, and microbiology reports.
RESULTS - Ninety-one patients (mean ± SD age, 65.4 ± 15.4 years) were identified from eight institutions. The mean × SD in situ dwell time of all catheters was 89.9 ± 127.1 days (total, 8,160 catheter-days). Seven infectious complications were identified, all of the pleural space. All patients were admitted to the hospital for treatment, with four requiring additional pleural procedures. Two patients died of septic shock related to pleural infection.
CONCLUSIONS - We present, to our knowledge, the largest study examining clinical outcomes related to IPC placement in patients with hematologic malignancy. An overall 7.7% infection risk and 2.2% mortality were identified, similar to previously reported studies, despite the significant immunosuppression and pancytopenia often present in this population. IPC placement appears to remain a reasonable clinical option for patients with recurrent pleural effusions related to hematologic malignancy.
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Infections associated with tunnelled indwelling pleural catheters in patients undergoing chemotherapy.
Mekhaiel E, Kashyap R, Mullon JJ, Maldonado F
(2013) J Bronchology Interv Pulmonol 20: 299-303
MeSH Terms: Aged, Antineoplastic Agents, Catheter-Related Infections, Catheters, Indwelling, Female, Humans, Incidence, Male, Middle Aged, Palliative Care, Pleural Effusion, Malignant, Retrospective Studies, Risk Factors
Show Abstract · Added February 1, 2016
BACKGROUND - Malignant pleural effusions are common complications of advanced malignancies and are associated with significant morbidity and reduced survival. Tunnelled indwelling pleural catheters (TIPCs) are implantable devices used for palliation of symptomatic malignant pleural effusions. Although complication rates are overall low, their use in the setting of concurrent chemotherapy has not been carefully reviewed. We report our experience with infectious complications directly attributable to TIPCs (pleural or local soft tissue infections) in those patients receiving concurrent chemotherapy.
METHODS - We conducted a retrospective analysis of patients who underwent TIPC placement for malignant pleural effusion in a 6-year period from November 2005 to March 2011. We reviewed the incidence of infection in these patients receiving catheter placement and attempted to determine whether chemotherapy was associated with an increased infectious risk.
RESULTS - A total of 262 TIPC procedures, performed in 243 patients, were included in the study. Out of 262, 173 (66%) TIPC were in the chemotherapy group and 89 TIPC were in the nonchemotherapy group. Infections developed in 16 of the 262 TIPC placements (6.1%). The rate of complications in the chemotherapy group was 9 of the 173 TIPCs (5.2%) compared with 7 of the 89 TIPCs (7.9%) in the other group, a difference that was not statistically different (P=0.4).
CONCLUSIONS - The overall risk of infection in TIPC is low. Patients undergoing chemotherapy while the TIPC is in place do not seem to have an increased risk of infection, and therefore chemotherapy should not necessarily be viewed as a contraindication to TIPC insertion.
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Incidence of catheter-related bloodstream infections in neonates following removal of peripherally inserted central venous catheters.
Casner M, Hoesli SJ, Slaughter JC, Hill M, Weitkamp JH
(2014) Pediatr Crit Care Med 15: 42-8
MeSH Terms: Anti-Bacterial Agents, Apnea, Birth Weight, Bradycardia, Catheter-Related Infections, Catheterization, Peripheral, Catheters, Indwelling, Central Venous Catheters, Device Removal, Female, Gestational Age, Humans, Incidence, Infant, Newborn, Infant, Very Low Birth Weight, Male, Prevalence, Sepsis, Time Factors, Vancomycin
Show Abstract · Added February 27, 2014
OBJECTIVES - Catheter-associated bloodstream infections are a significant source of morbidity and healthcare cost in the neonatal ICU. Previous studies examining the prevalence of bloodstream infections after removal of peripherally inserted central venous catheters in neonates are equivocal.
DESIGN - A retrospective cohort study.
PATIENTS - All infants with peripherally inserted central venous catheters treated at the Vanderbilt neonatal ICU between 2007 and 2009.
MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS - We evaluated the following outcomes: 1) bloodstream infections, 2) culture-negative sepsis, 3) number of sepsis evaluations, and 4) number of significant apnea/bradycardia events comparing odds ratios between 72 hours before and 72 hours after peripherally inserted central venous catheter removal. We analyzed a total of 1,002 peripherally inserted central venous catheters in 856 individual infants with a median (interquartile range) gestational age of 31 weeks (28-37 wk) and a median birth weight of 1,469 g (960-2,690 g). Comparing 72 hours before with 72 hours after peripherally inserted central venous catheter removal did not show a difference in the prevalence of bloodstream infections (9 vs 3, p = 0.08), prevalence of culture-negative sepsis (37 vs 40, p = 0.73), number of sepsis evaluations (p = 0.42), or number of apnea/bradycardia events (p = 0.32). However, in peripherally inserted central venous catheter not used for delivery of antibiotics, there was a 3.83-fold increase in odds for culture-negative sepsis following peripherally inserted central venous catheter removal (95% confidence interval, 1.48-10.5; p = 0.001). For infants less than 1,500 g birth weight (very low birth weight), odds for culture-negative sepsis increased to 6.3-fold following removal of peripherally inserted central venous catheters not used for antibiotic delivery (95% confidence interval, 1.78-26.86; p < 0.01).
CONCLUSIONS - Although these data do not support the routine use of antibiotics for sepsis prophylaxis prior to peripherally inserted central venous catheter removal, they suggests that very low birth weight infants not recently exposed to antibiotics are at increased odds for associated adverse events following discontinuation of their peripherally inserted central venous catheter.
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20 MeSH Terms
The role for tunneled indwelling pleural catheters in patients with persistent benign chylothorax.
DePew ZS, Iqbal S, Mullon JJ, Nichols FC, Maldonado F
(2013) Am J Med Sci 346: 349-52
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Catheters, Indwelling, Chylothorax, Cohort Studies, Disease Management, Female, Humans, Male, Pleural Cavity, Radiography, Thoracic, Retrospective Studies, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added February 1, 2016
BACKGROUND - Utilization of tunneled indwelling pleural catheters (TIPCs) for persistent pleural effusions is increasingly more common; however, the presence of chylothorax is generally considered a contraindication for utilization of a TIPC due to concerns regarding potential nutritional, immunologic and hemodynamic complications. Therefore, in this study, a cohort of patients with persistent benign chylothorax managed with TIPCs is described.
METHODS - A retrospective analysis of patients with persistent benign chylothorax managed with a TIPC at the study center between January 1, 2008, and March 1, 2012, was completed. Extracted data included patient characteristics, chylothorax etiologies, prior interventions, outcomes and complications.
RESULTS - Eleven patients (14 hemithoraces) had persistent benign chylothorax treated with placement of a TIPC during the inclusion time frame. Etiology of the chylothorax was nontraumatic in 8 of the 11 patients, with the remaining 3 secondary to thoracic surgery. Pleurodesis was achieved in 9 of the 14 hemithoraces, with a median time to pleurodesis of 176 days. All procedures were well tolerated, and no immediate periprocedural complications were reported. One serious complication was encountered in the form of a postoperative pulmonary embolism after replacement of an occluded TIPC, resulting in the patient's death. Two patients had transient occlusions of their TIPCs successfully treated with intracatheter thrombolytic therapy. No significant adverse nutritional, hemodynamic or immunologic outcomes were reported during follow-up for any included patient.
CONCLUSIONS - Utilization of a TIPC for the management of persistent benign chylothorax should be considered early because pleurodesis may be frequently and safely achieved in this patient population.
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Measurement of glucose homeostasis in vivo: combination of tracers and clamp techniques.
Shiota M
(2012) Methods Mol Biol 933: 229-53
MeSH Terms: Animals, Blood Glucose, Catheterization, Catheters, Indwelling, Equipment Design, Glucagon, Glucose, Glucose Clamp Technique, Glycogen, Homeostasis, Insulin, Insulin Resistance, Mice, Pancreas, Rats, Vascular Surgical Procedures
Show Abstract · Added February 19, 2015
A tracer technique referred to as "pancreatic-blood glucose clamp" allows assessment in response to a change in blood glucose, insulin, and/or glucagon of whole body glucose disposal, endogenous glucose production, specific tissue/organ glucose uptake and storage, and insulin secretion. This technique is currently considered the optimal method for measurement of insulin sensitivity and glucose effectiveness. We describe here, for use in conscious-unrestrained mice and rats, the pancreatic-blood glucose clamp technique and its associated methods; which include catheterization of blood vessels; a clamp of plasma insulin, glucagon, and glucose; analyses of metabolites and tracers; and calculations.
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16 MeSH Terms
Dialysis at a crossroads: 50 years later.
Parker T, Hakim R, Nissenson AR, Steinman T, Glassock RJ
(2011) Clin J Am Soc Nephrol 6: 457-61
MeSH Terms: Catheters, Indwelling, Extracellular Fluid, Fibrosis, History, 20th Century, History, 21st Century, Humans, Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular, Kidney Failure, Chronic, Renal Dialysis, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Time Factors, Treatment Outcome, Water-Electrolyte Balance
Show Abstract · Added May 20, 2014
The ability to offer repetitive hemodialysis for treatment of chronic kidney failure has now reached its half-century anniversary. Although millions of patients have benefited from this life-extending procedure, current results in the United States have now stagnated with only small annual improvements in survival and continued high hospitalization rates. Recognition that this stagnation may be, at least in part, the result of inadequacies of current and prior paths utilized in dialysis treatment has led to the concept that dialysis therapy is at a crossroads and that new paths need to be articulated, explored, and applied. This article proposes some of these new paths and their rationale. Two elements of the new paths are emphasized: avoidance of indwelling catheters for vascular access and meticulous attention to control of extracellular volume and mitigation of left ventricular hypertrophy and fibrosis. It is postulated that progress in these two areas, along with continued attention to other elements embodied in the new and old paths, will unlock the stagnation in outcomes of dialysis therapy of end-stage kidney failure and allow it to realize its full potential of prolonging life and alleviating disability.
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14 MeSH Terms
A silver-alginate-coated dressing to reduce peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) infections in NICU patients: a pilot randomized controlled trial.
Hill ML, Baldwin L, Slaughter JC, Walsh WF, Weitkamp JH
(2010) J Perinatol 30: 469-73
MeSH Terms: Administration, Cutaneous, Alginates, Anti-Bacterial Agents, Bandages, Catheterization, Central Venous, Catheters, Indwelling, Female, Glucuronic Acid, Hexuronic Acids, Humans, Infant, Newborn, Male, Pilot Projects, Polysaccharides, Sepsis, Silver, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added February 27, 2014
OBJECTIVE - Our aim was to evaluate the safety of a silver-alginate-containing dressing to reduce peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) infections in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) patients.
STUDY DESIGN - Patients were randomized 3:1 to receive a patch containing silver, alginate and maltodextrin or standard of care. Patches were placed under the regular transparent retention dressing at the PICC exit site at insertion and were replaced with every dressing change at least every 2 weeks until PICC discontinuation. All study infants were monitored for adverse skin reactions.
RESULT - A total of 100 infants were followed up for 1922 person-days, including 75 subjects with 89 PICCs who received the patch. The median birth weight (1330 g) and median gestational age (30 weeks) was lower in the patch group when compared with the controls (P=0.001 and 0.005, respectively). Study patients received the patch with their PICC at a median age of 5 days; the patch stayed in place for a median of 13 days. We noted no adverse skin reactions and found no evidence that the patch alters the microbiology of PICC-associated infections.
CONCLUSION - This pilot trial suggests that silver-alginate-coated dressings are skin safe and their inclusion in future trials aimed at reduction of PICC-associated bloodstream infections in the NICU should be considered.
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17 MeSH Terms
Percutaneous ureteral interventions.
Adamo R, Saad WE, Brown DB
(2009) Tech Vasc Interv Radiol 12: 205-15
MeSH Terms: Catheterization, Catheters, Indwelling, Constriction, Pathologic, Embolization, Therapeutic, Humans, Nephrostomy, Percutaneous, Radiography, Interventional, Stents, Treatment Outcome, Ureteral Obstruction, Urinary Fistula
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
Urinary strictures are commonly managed by interventional radiologists and can result from both benign and malignant etiologies. Many patients end up with lifelong catheters. Although stricture dilation is commonly unsuccessful, some patients can eventually become catheter free. This review describes current outcomes with a variety of dilation and stenting techniques. Management of complex ureteral and urinary complications is also reviewed, including ureteral/arterial fistulas and ureteral embolization for permanent diversion.
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11 MeSH Terms
Management of nephrostomy drains and ureteral stents.
Adamo R, Saad WE, Brown DB
(2009) Tech Vasc Interv Radiol 12: 193-204
MeSH Terms: Algorithms, Catheters, Indwelling, Clinical Protocols, Drainage, Humans, Nephrostomy, Percutaneous, Patient Selection, Prosthesis Design, Radiography, Interventional, Stents, Treatment Outcome, Ureteral Obstruction, Urinary Diversion
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
Nephroureteral and double J stents are routinely placed by interventional radiologists but quality literature on placement and management of these devices is limited. The purpose of this review is to detail indications for ureteral stent placement, review the types of antegrade and retrograde devices that are placed including technical tips, and discuss management of common complications that occur in this patient population. An algorithm for placement and management is included.
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13 MeSH Terms