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Validation of Human Sterol 14α-Demethylase (CYP51) Druggability: Structure-Guided Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of Stoichiometric, Functionally Irreversible Inhibitors.
Friggeri L, Hargrove TY, Wawrzak Z, Guengerich FP, Lepesheva GI
(2019) J Med Chem 62: 10391-10401
MeSH Terms: 14-alpha Demethylase Inhibitors, Animals, Catalytic Domain, Crystallography, X-Ray, Drug Design, Humans, Molecular Structure, Mutagenesis, Site-Directed, Protozoan Proteins, Sterol 14-Demethylase
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Sterol 14α-demethylases (CYP51) are the cytochrome P450 enzymes required for biosynthesis of sterols in eukaryotes, the major targets for antifungal agents and prospective targets for treatment of protozoan infections. Human CYP51 could be and, for a while, was considered as a potential target for cholesterol-lowering drugs (the role that is now played by statins, which are also in clinical trials for cancer) but revealed high intrinsic resistance to inhibition. While microbial CYP51 enzymes are often inhibited stoichiometrically and functionally irreversibly, no strong inhibitors have been identified for human CYP51. In this study, we used comparative structure/functional analysis of CYP51 orthologs from different biological kingdoms and employed site-directed mutagenesis to elucidate the molecular basis for the resistance of the human enzyme to inhibition and also designed, synthesized, and characterized new compounds. Two of them inhibit human CYP51 functionally irreversibly with their potency approaching the potencies of azole drugs currently used to inhibit microbial CYP51.
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In Vitro Activation of Cytochrome P450 46A1 (CYP46A1) by Efavirenz-Related Compounds.
Mast N, Verwilst P, Wilkey CJ, Guengerich FP, Pikuleva IA
(2020) J Med Chem 63: 6477-6488
MeSH Terms: Alkynes, Allosteric Site, Benzoxazines, Catalytic Domain, Cholesterol, Cholesterol 24-Hydroxylase, Cyclopropanes, Cytochrome P-450 CYP3A Inducers, Humans, Hydroxylation, In Vitro Techniques, Pharmaceutical Preparations, Protein Conformation
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Cytochrome P450 46A1 (CYP46A1) is a central nervous system-specific enzyme, which catalyzes cholesterol 24-hydroxylation. Currently CYP46A1 is being evaluated in a clinical trial for activation by small doses of the anti-HIV drug efavirenz. Eight efavirenz-related compounds were investigated for CYP46A1 activation in vitro, induction of a CYP46A1 spectral response, spectral values, interaction with the P450 allosteric sites, and a model of binding to the enzyme active site. We gained insight into structure-activity relationships of efavirenz for CYP46A1 activation and found that the investigated efavirenz primary metabolites are stronger and better activators of CYP46A1 than efavirenz. We also established that CYP46A1 is activated by racemates and that a conformational-selection mechanism is operative in CYP46A1. The results suggest structural modifications of efavirenz to further increase CYP46A1 activation without inhibition at high compound concentrations. It is possible that not only efavirenz but its metabolites activate CYP46A1 in vivo.
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Synthesis and Characterization of Site-Specific O -Alkylguanine DNA-Alkyl Transferase-Oligonucleotide Crosslinks.
Ghodke PP, Albertolle ME, Johnson KM, Guengerich FP
(2019) Curr Protoc Nucleic Acid Chem 76: e74
MeSH Terms: Catalysis, Catalytic Domain, Chromatography, Liquid, Copper, Cross-Linking Reagents, Escherichia coli, O(6)-Methylguanine-DNA Methyltransferase, Oligonucleotides, Polymerization, Tandem Mass Spectrometry, Templates, Genetic, Trypsin
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
O -Alkylguanine DNA-alkyltransferase (AGT), a DNA repair protein, can form crosslinks with DNA. The AGT-DNA crosslinks are known to be mutagenic when AGT is heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, as well as in mammalian cells. To understand the biological consequences, reliable access to AGT-oligonucleotide crosslinks is needed. This article describes the synthesis and characterization of site-specific AGT-oligonucleotide crosslinks at the N2-position of deoxyguanosine and N6-position of deoxyadenosine. We developed a post-oligomerization strategy for the synthesis of propargyl-modified oligonucleotides. Copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition was used as a key step to obtain the iodoacetamide-linked oligonucleotides, which serve as good electrophiles for the crosslinking reaction with cysteine-145 of the active site of AGT. Trypsinization of AGT and hydrolysis of oligonucleotides, combined with analysis by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, was utilized to confirm the nucleobase-adducted peptides. This method provides a useful strategy for the synthesis and characterization of site-specific DNA-protein crosslinks, which can be further used to understand proteolytic degradation-coupled DNA repair mechanisms. © 2019 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
© 2019 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
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The Structure of the Bifunctional Everninomicin Biosynthetic Enzyme EvdMO1 Suggests Independent Activity of the Fused Methyltransferase-Oxidase Domains.
Starbird CA, Perry NA, Chen Q, Berndt S, Yamakawa I, Loukachevitch LV, Limbrick EM, Bachmann BO, Iverson TM, McCulloch KM
(2018) Biochemistry 57: 6827-6837
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Aminoglycosides, Bacterial Proteins, Biosynthetic Pathways, Catalytic Domain, Conserved Sequence, Crystallography, X-Ray, Gene Fusion, Genes, Bacterial, Methyltransferases, Micromonospora, Models, Molecular, Oxygenases, Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs, Sequence Homology, Amino Acid
Show Abstract · Added April 1, 2019
Members of the orthosomycin family of natural products are decorated polysaccharides with potent antibiotic activity and complex biosynthetic pathways. The defining feature of the orthosomycins is an orthoester linkage between carbohydrate moieties that is necessary for antibiotic activity and is likely formed by a family of conserved oxygenases. Everninomicins are octasaccharide orthosomycins produced by Micromonospora carbonacea that have two orthoester linkages and a methylenedioxy bridge, three features whose formation logically requires oxidative chemistry. Correspondingly, the evd gene cluster encoding everninomicin D encodes two monofunctional nonheme iron, α-ketoglutarate-dependent oxygenases and one bifunctional enzyme with an N-terminal methyltransferase domain and a C-terminal oxygenase domain. To investigate whether the activities of these domains are linked in the bifunctional enzyme EvdMO1, we determined the structure of the N-terminal methyltransferase domain to 1.1 Å and that of the full-length protein to 3.35 Å resolution. Both domains of EvdMO1 adopt the canonical folds of their respective superfamilies and are connected by a short linker. Each domain's active site is oriented such that it faces away from the other domain, and there is no evidence of a channel connecting the two. Our results support EvdMO1 working as a bifunctional enzyme with independent catalytic activities.
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15 MeSH Terms
Dual cyclooxygenase-fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor exploits novel binding interactions in the cyclooxygenase active site.
Goodman MC, Xu S, Rouzer CA, Banerjee S, Ghebreselasie K, Migliore M, Piomelli D, Marnett LJ
(2018) J Biol Chem 293: 3028-3038
MeSH Terms: Amidohydrolases, Catalytic Domain, Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors, Isoenzymes, Phenylcarbamates, Phenylpropionates, Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases, Protein Binding, Stereoisomerism, Substrate Specificity
Show Abstract · Added April 22, 2018
The cyclooxygenases COX-1 and COX-2 oxygenate arachidonic acid (AA) to prostaglandin H (PGH). COX-2 also oxygenates the endocannabinoids 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and arachidonoylethanolamide (AEA) to the corresponding PGH analogs. Both enzymes are targets of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), but NSAID-mediated COX inhibition is associated with gastrointestinal toxicity. One potential strategy to counter this toxicity is to also inhibit fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), which hydrolyzes bioactive fatty acid ethanolamides (FAEs) into fatty acids and ethanolamine. Here, we investigated the mechanism of COX inhibition by ARN2508, an NSAID that inhibits both COXs and FAAH with high potency, target selectivity, and decreased gastrointestinal toxicity in mouse models, presumably due to its ability to increase levels of FAEs. A 2.27-Å-resolution X-ray crystal structure of the COX-2·()-ARN2508 complex reveals that ARN2508 adopts a binding pose similar to that of its parent NSAID flurbiprofen. However, ARN2508's alkyl tail is inserted deep into the top channel, an active site region not exploited by any previously reported NSAID. As for flurbiprofen, ARN2508's potency is highly dependent on the configuration of the α-methyl group. Thus, ()-ARN2508 is more potent than ()-ARN2508 for inhibition of AA oxygenation by both COXs and 2-AG oxygenation by COX-2. Also, similarly to ()-flurbiprofen, ()-ARN2508 exhibits substrate selectivity for inhibition of 2-AG oxygenation. Site-directed mutagenesis confirms the importance of insertion of the alkyl tail into the top channel for ()-ARN2508's potency and suggests a role for Ser-530 as a determinant of the inhibitor's slow rate of inhibition compared with that of ()-flurbiprofen.
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New crystal forms of the integral membrane Escherichia coli quinol:fumarate reductase suggest that ligands control domain movement.
Starbird CA, Tomasiak TM, Singh PK, Yankovskaya V, Maklashina E, Eisenbach M, Cecchini G, Iverson TM
(2018) J Struct Biol 202: 100-104
MeSH Terms: Binding Sites, Catalytic Domain, Crystallography, Crystallography, X-Ray, Escherichia coli Proteins, Ligands, Membrane Proteins, Models, Molecular, Oxidoreductases, Protein Domains, Rotation
Show Abstract · Added April 1, 2019
Quinol:fumarate reductase (QFR) is an integral membrane protein and a member of the respiratory Complex II superfamily. Although the structure of Escherichia coli QFR was first reported almost twenty years ago, many open questions of catalysis remain. Here we report two new crystal forms of QFR, one grown from the lipidic cubic phase and one grown from dodecyl maltoside micelles. QFR crystals grown from the lipid cubic phase processed as P1, merged to 7.5 Å resolution, and exhibited crystal packing similar to previous crystal forms. Crystals grown from dodecyl maltoside micelles processed as P2, merged to 3.35 Å resolution, and displayed a unique crystal packing. This latter crystal form provides the first view of the E. coli QFR active site without a dicarboxylate ligand. Instead, an unidentified anion binds at a shifted position. In one of the molecules in the asymmetric unit, this is accompanied by rotation of the capping domain of the catalytic subunit. In the other molecule, this is associated with loss of interpretable electron density for this same capping domain. Analysis of the structure suggests that the ligand adjusts the position of the capping domain.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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11 MeSH Terms
Selective base excision repair of DNA damage by the non-base-flipping DNA glycosylase AlkC.
Shi R, Mullins EA, Shen XX, Lay KT, Yuen PK, David SS, Rokas A, Eichman BF
(2018) EMBO J 37: 63-74
MeSH Terms: Adenine, Alkylation, Amino Acid Sequence, Bacillus cereus, Catalytic Domain, Crystallography, X-Ray, DNA Adducts, DNA Damage, DNA Glycosylases, DNA Repair, Models, Molecular, Protein Conformation, Sequence Homology
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2018
DNA glycosylases preserve genome integrity and define the specificity of the base excision repair pathway for discreet, detrimental modifications, and thus, the mechanisms by which glycosylases locate DNA damage are of particular interest. Bacterial AlkC and AlkD are specific for cationic alkylated nucleobases and have a distinctive HEAT-like repeat (HLR) fold. AlkD uses a unique non-base-flipping mechanism that enables excision of bulky lesions more commonly associated with nucleotide excision repair. In contrast, AlkC has a much narrower specificity for small lesions, principally N3-methyladenine (3mA). Here, we describe how AlkC selects for and excises 3mA using a non-base-flipping strategy distinct from that of AlkD. A crystal structure resembling a catalytic intermediate complex shows how AlkC uses unique HLR and immunoglobulin-like domains to induce a sharp kink in the DNA, exposing the damaged nucleobase to active site residues that project into the DNA This active site can accommodate and excise N3-methylcytosine (3mC) and N1-methyladenine (1mA), which are also repaired by AlkB-catalyzed oxidative demethylation, providing a potential alternative mechanism for repair of these lesions in bacteria.
© 2017 The Authors.
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13 MeSH Terms
A Polymerase With Potential: The Fe-S Cluster in Human DNA Primase.
Holt ME, Salay LE, Chazin WJ
(2017) Methods Enzymol 595: 361-390
MeSH Terms: Catalytic Domain, DNA, DNA Primase, DNA Primers, DNA Replication, Humans, Iron-Sulfur Proteins, Oxidation-Reduction, RNA, Sequence Analysis
Show Abstract · Added March 24, 2018
Replication of DNA in eukaryotes is primarily executed by the combined action of processive DNA polymerases δ and ɛ. These enzymes cannot initiate synthesis of new DNA without the presence of a primer on the template ssDNA. The primers on both the leading and lagging strands are generated by DNA polymerase α-primase (pol-prim). DNA primase is a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase that synthesizes the first ~10 nucleotides and then transfers the substrate to polymerase α to complete primer synthesis. The mechanisms governing the coordination and handoff between primase and polymerase α are largely unknown. Isolated DNA primase contains a [4Fe-4S] cluster that has been shown to serve as a redox switch modulating DNA binding affinity. This discovery suggests a mechanism for modulating the priming activity of primase and handoff to polymerase α. In this chapter, we briefly discuss the current state of knowledge of primase structure and function, including the role of its iron-sulfur cluster. This is followed by providing the methods for expressing, purifying, and biophysically/structurally characterizing primase and its iron-sulfur cluster-containing domain, p58C.
© 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Horse Liver Alcohol Dehydrogenase: Zinc Coordination and Catalysis.
Plapp BV, Savarimuthu BR, Ferraro DJ, Rubach JK, Brown EN, Ramaswamy S
(2017) Biochemistry 56: 3632-3646
MeSH Terms: 2,2'-Dipyridyl, Adenosine Diphosphate Ribose, Alcohol Dehydrogenase, Animals, Catalytic Domain, Crystallography, X-Ray, Formamides, Horses, Kinetics, Liver, Models, Molecular, NAD, Phenanthrolines, Protein Binding, Protein Conformation, Water, Zinc
Show Abstract · Added August 31, 2017
During catalysis by liver alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), a water bound to the catalytic zinc is replaced by the oxygen of the substrates. The mechanism might involve a pentacoordinated zinc or a double-displacement reaction with participation by a nearby glutamate residue, as suggested by studies of human ADH3, yeast ADH1, and some other tetrameric ADHs. Zinc coordination and participation of water in the enzyme mechanism were investigated by X-ray crystallography. The apoenzyme and its complex with adenosine 5'-diphosphoribose have an open protein conformation with the catalytic zinc in one position, tetracoordinated by Cys-46, His-67, Cys-174, and a water molecule. The bidentate chelators 2,2'-bipyridine and 1,10-phenanthroline displace the water and form a pentacoordinated zinc. The enzyme-NADH complex has a closed conformation similar to that of ternary complexes with coenzyme and substrate analogues; the coordination of the catalytic zinc is similar to that found in the apoenzyme, except that a minor, alternative position for the catalytic zinc is ∼1.3 Å from the major position and closer to Glu-68, which could form the alternative coordination to the catalytic zinc. Complexes with NADH and N-1-methylhexylformamide or N-benzylformamide (or with NAD and fluoro alcohols) have the classical tetracoordinated zinc, and no water is bound to the zinc or the nicotinamide rings. The major forms of the enzyme in the mechanism have a tetracoordinated zinc, where the carboxylate group of Glu-68 could participate in the exchange of water and substrates on the zinc. Hydride transfer in the Michaelis complexes does not involve a nearby water.
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17 MeSH Terms
Roles of Human CYP2A6 and Monkey CYP2A24 and 2A26 Cytochrome P450 Enzymes in the Oxidation of 2,5,2',5'-Tetrachlorobiphenyl.
Shimada T, Kakimoto K, Takenaka S, Koga N, Uehara S, Murayama N, Yamazaki H, Kim D, Guengerich FP, Komori M
(2016) Drug Metab Dispos 44: 1899-1909
MeSH Terms: Animals, Catalysis, Catalytic Domain, Cytochrome P-450 CYP2A6, Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme System, Haplorhini, Humans, Ligands, Molecular Docking Simulation, Oxidation-Reduction, Polychlorinated Biphenyls, Protein Binding
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
2,5,2',5'-Tetrachlorobiphenyl (TCB) induced type I binding spectra with cytochrome P450 (P450) 2A6 and 2A13, with K values of 9.4 and 0.51 µM, respectively. However, CYP2A6 oxidized 2,5,2',5'-TCB to form 4-hydroxylated products at a much higher rate (∼1.0 minute) than CYP2A13 (∼0.02 minute) based on analysis by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Formation of 4-hydroxy-2,5,2',5'-TCB by CYP2A6 was greater than that of 3-hydroxy-2,5,2',5'-TCB and three other hydroxylated products. Several human P450 enzymes, including CYP1A1, 1A2, 1B1, 2B6, 2D6, 2E1, 2C9, and 3A4, did not show any detectable activities in oxidizing 2,5,2',5'-TCB. Cynomolgus monkey CYP2A24, which shows 95% amino acid identity to human CYP2A6, catalyzed 4-hydroxylation of 2,5,2',5'-TCB at a higher rate (∼0.3 minute) than CYP2A26 (93% identity to CYP2A6, ∼0.13 minute) and CYP2A23 (94% identity to CYP2A13, ∼0.008 minute). None of these human and monkey CYP2A enzymes were catalytically active in oxidizing other TCB congeners, such as 2,4,3',4'-, 3,4,3',4'-, and 3,5,3',5'-TCB. Molecular docking analysis suggested that there are different orientations of interaction of 2,5,2',5'-TCB with the active sites (over the heme) of human and monkey CYP2A enzymes, and that ligand interaction energies (U values) of bound protein-ligand complexes show structural relationships of interaction of TCBs and other ligands with active sites of CYP2A enzymes. Catalytic differences in human and monkey CYP2A enzymes in the oxidation of 2,5,2',5'-TCB are suggested to be due to amino acid changes at substrate recognition sites, i.e., V110L, I209S, I300F, V365M, S369G, and R372H, based on the comparison of primary sequences.
Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.
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