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Cardio-Oncology Training: A Proposal From the International Cardioncology Society and Canadian Cardiac Oncology Network for a New Multidisciplinary Specialty.
Lenihan DJ, Hartlage G, DeCara J, Blaes A, Finet JE, Lyon AR, Cornell RF, Moslehi J, Oliveira GH, Murtagh G, Fisch M, Zeevi G, Iakobishvili Z, Witteles R, Patel A, Harrison E, Fradley M, Curigliano G, Lenneman CG, Magalhaes A, Krone R, Porter C, Parasher S, Dent S, Douglas P, Carver J
(2016) J Card Fail 22: 465-71
MeSH Terms: Canada, Cardiology, Cardiovascular Diseases, Consensus, Education, Medical, Graduate, Humans, Interprofessional Relations, Medical Oncology, Societies, Medical
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2017
There is an increasing awareness and clinical interest in cardiac safety during cancer therapy as well as in optimally addressing cardiac issues in cancer survivors. Although there is an emerging expertise in this area, known as cardio-oncology, there is a lack of organization in the essential components of contemporary training. This proposal, an international consensus statement organized by the International Cardioncology Society and the Canadian Cardiac Oncology Network, attempts to marshal the important ongoing efforts for training the next generation of cardio-oncologists. The necessary elements are outlined, including the expectations for exposure necessary to develop adequate training. There should also be a commitment to local, regional, and international education and research in cardio-oncology as a requirement for advancement in the field.
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
9 MeSH Terms
2015 ACR/ACC/AHA/AATS/ACEP/ASNC/NASCI/SAEM/SCCT/SCMR/SCPC/SNMMI/STR/STS Appropriate Utilization of Cardiovascular Imaging in Emergency Department Patients With Chest Pain: A Joint Document of the American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria Committee and the American College of Cardiology Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force.
Emergency Department Patients With Chest Pain Writing Panel, Rybicki FJ, Udelson JE, Peacock WF, Goldhaber SZ, Isselbacher EM, Kazerooni E, Kontos MC, Litt H, Woodard PK, Emergency Department Patients With Chest Pain Rating Panel, Appropriate Utilization of Cardiovascular Imaging Oversight Committee
(2016) J Am Coll Radiol 13: e1-e29
MeSH Terms: Advisory Committees, Angina Pectoris, Cardiac Imaging Techniques, Cardiology, Chest Pain, Emergency Service, Hospital, Humans, Societies, Medical, United States
Added September 11, 2017
0 Communities
1 Members
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9 MeSH Terms
National Institutes of Health Career Development Awards for Cardiovascular Physician-Scientists: Recent Trends and Strategies for Success.
Lindman BR, Tong CW, Carlson DE, Balke CW, Jackson EA, Madhur MS, Barac A, Abdalla M, Brittain EL, Desai N, Kates AM, Freeman AM, Mann DL
(2015) J Am Coll Cardiol 66: 1816-1827
MeSH Terms: Awards and Prizes, Biomedical Research, Cardiology, Career Mobility, Humans, Mentors, National Institutes of Health (U.S.), Physicians, Research Personnel, United States
Show Abstract · Added April 22, 2016
Nurturing the development of cardiovascular physician-scientist investigators is critical for sustained progress in cardiovascular science and improving human health. The transition from an inexperienced trainee to an independent physician-scientist is a multifaceted process requiring a sustained commitment from the trainee, mentors, and institution. A cornerstone of this training process is a career development (K) award from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). These awards generally require 75% of the awardee's professional effort devoted to research aims and diverse career development activities carried out in a mentored environment over a 5-year period. We report on recent success rates for obtaining NIH K awards, provide strategies for preparing a successful application and navigating the early career period for aspiring cardiovascular investigators, and offer cardiovascular division leadership perspectives regarding K awards in the current era. Our objective is to offer practical advice that will equip trainees considering an investigator path for success.
Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
1 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
10 MeSH Terms
Utility of Nontraditional Risk Markers in Individuals Ineligible for Statin Therapy According to the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Cholesterol Guidelines.
Yeboah J, Polonsky TS, Young R, McClelland RL, Delaney JC, Dawood F, Blaha MJ, Miedema MD, Sibley CT, Carr JJ, Burke GL, Goff DC, Psaty BM, Greenland P, Herrington DM
(2015) Circulation 132: 916-22
MeSH Terms: Aged, Aged, 80 and over, American Heart Association, Atherosclerosis, Biomarkers, Cardiology, Cholesterol, Cohort Studies, Female, Humans, Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors, Male, Middle Aged, Practice Guidelines as Topic, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors, United States
Show Abstract · Added August 24, 2015
BACKGROUND - In the general population, the majority of cardiovascular events occur in people at the low to moderate end of population risk distribution. The 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guideline on the treatment of blood cholesterol recommends consideration of statin therapy for adults with an estimated 10-year atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk ≥7.5% based on traditional risk factors. Whether use of nontraditional risk markers can improve risk assessment in those below this threshold for statin therapy is unclear.
METHODS AND RESULTS - Using data from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA), a population sample free of clinical CVD at baseline, we calibrated the Pooled Cohort Equations (cPCE). ASCVD was defined as myocardial infarction, coronary heart disease death, or fatal or nonfatal stroke. Adults with an initial cPCE <7.5% and elevated levels of additional risk markers (abnormal test) whose new calculated risk was ≥7.5% were considered statin eligible: low-density lipoprotein cholesterol ≥160 mg/dL; family history of ASCVD; high-sensitivity C-reactive protein ≥2 mg/dL; coronary artery calcium score ≥300 Agatston units or ≥75th percentile for age, sex, and ethnicity; and ankle-brachial index <0.9. We compared the absolute and relative ASCVD risks among those with versus without elevated posttest estimated risk. We calculated the number needed to screen to identify 1 person with abnormal test for each risk marker, defined as the number of participants with baseline cPCE risk <7.5% divided by the number with an abnormal test reclassified as statin eligible. Of 5185 participants not taking statins with complete data (age, 45-84 years), 4185 had a cPCE risk <7.5%. During 10 years of follow-up, 57% of the ASCVD events (183 of 320) occurred among adults with a cPCE risk <7.5%. When people with diabetes mellitus were excluded, the coronary artery calcium criterion reclassified 6.8% upward, with an event rate of 13.3%, absolute risk of 10%, relative risk of 4.0 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.8-5.7), and number needed to screen of 14.7. The corresponding numbers for family history of ASCVD were 4.6%, 15.1%, 12%, 4.3 (95% CI, 3.0-6.4), and 21.8; for high-sensitivity C-reactive protein criteria, 2.6%, 10%, 6%, 2.6 (95% CI, 1.4-4.8), and 39.2; for ankle-brachial index criteria, 0.6%, 9%, 5%, 2.3 (95% CI, 0.6-8.6), and 176.5; and for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol criteria, 0.5%, 5%, 1%, 1.2 (95% CI, 0.2-8.4), and 193.3, respectively. Of the 3882 with <7.5% cPCE risk, 431 (11.1%) were reclassified to ≥7.5% (statin eligible) by at least 1 of the additional risk marker criteria.
CONCLUSIONS - In this generally low-risk population sample, a large proportion of ASCVD events occurred among adults with a 10-year cPCE risk <7.5%. We found that the coronary artery calcium score, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, family history of ASCVD, and ankle-brachial index recommendations by the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association cholesterol guidelines (Class IIB) identify small subgroups of asymptomatic population with a 10-year cPCE risk <7.5% but with observed ASCVD event rates >7.5% who may warrant statin therapy considerations.
© 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.
0 Communities
1 Members
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17 MeSH Terms
The Society for Vascular Medicine: the first quarter century.
Creager MA, Hiatt WR, Hirsch AT, Olin JW, Jaff MR, Cooke JP, Rooke T, Beckman JA, Froehlich JB
(2015) Vasc Med 20: 60-8
MeSH Terms: Anniversaries and Special Events, Biomedical Research, Cardiology, Cooperative Behavior, History, 20th Century, History, 21st Century, Humans, Interdisciplinary Communication, International Cooperation, Societies, Medical, Vascular Diseases
Show Abstract · Added January 15, 2016
The Society for Vascular Medicine was founded in 1989. During the subsequent 25 years, the Society has grown to approximately 500 members and has achieved international recognition while making important contributions to vascular disease education, clinical vascular medicine and biology research, and patient care. In celebration of the Society's 25th anniversary, its past and current presidents reflect on the Society's history, challenges, and achievements, and emphasize the vital role of the SVM in the discipline of vascular medicine.
© The Author(s) 2015.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
11 MeSH Terms
Research priorities in sarcomeric cardiomyopathies.
van der Velden J, Ho CY, Tardiff JC, Olivotto I, Knollmann BC, Carrier L
(2015) Cardiovasc Res 105: 449-56
MeSH Terms: Animals, Biomedical Research, Cardiology, Cardiomyopathies, Genetic Markers, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Humans, Mutation, Phenotype, Research, Sarcomeres
Show Abstract · Added February 12, 2015
The clinical variability in patients with sarcomeric cardiomyopathies is striking: a mutation causes cardiomyopathy in one individual, while the identical mutation is harmless in a family member. Moreover, the clinical phenotype varies ranging from asymmetric hypertrophy to severe dilatation of the heart. Identification of a single phenotype-associated disease mechanism would facilitate the design of targeted treatments for patient groups with different clinical phenotypes. However, evidence from both the clinic and basic knowledge of functional and structural properties of the sarcomere argues against a 'one size fits all' therapy for treatment of one clinical phenotype. Meticulous clinical and basic studies are needed to unravel the initial and progressive changes initiated by sarcomere mutations to better understand why mutations in the same gene can lead to such opposing phenotypes. Ultimately, we need to design an 'integrative physiology' approach to fully realize patient/gene-tailored therapy. Expertise within different research fields (cardiology, genetics, cellular biology, physiology, and pharmacology) must be joined to link longitudinal clinical studies with mechanistic insights obtained from molecular and functional studies in novel cardiac muscle systems. New animal models, which reflect both initial and more advanced stages of sarcomeric cardiomyopathy, will also aid in achieving these goals. Here, we discuss current priorities in clinical and preclinical investigation aimed at increasing our understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms leading from mutation to disease. Such information will provide the basis to improve risk stratification and to develop therapies to prevent/rescue cardiac dysfunction and remodelling caused by sarcomere mutations.
Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.
0 Communities
1 Members
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11 MeSH Terms
2014 ACC/AHA guideline on perioperative cardiovascular evaluation and management of patients undergoing noncardiac surgery: executive summary: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on practice guidelines. Developed in collaboration with the American College of Surgeons, American Society of Anesthesiologists, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists, and Society of Vascular Medicine Endorsed by the Society of Hospital Medicine.
Fleisher LA, Fleischmann KE, Auerbach AD, Barnason SA, Beckman JA, Bozkurt B, Davila-Roman VG, Gerhard-Herman MD, Holly TA, Kane GC, Marine JE, Nelson MT, Spencer CC, Thompson A, Ting HH, Uretsky BF, Wijeysundera DN
(2015) J Nucl Cardiol 22: 162-215
MeSH Terms: American Heart Association, Cardiology, Cardiovascular Diseases, Humans, Pain Management, Perioperative Care, Surgical Procedures, Operative, United States
Added January 15, 2016
0 Communities
1 Members
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8 MeSH Terms
Approaches to enhancing radiation safety in cardiovascular imaging: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association.
Fazel R, Gerber TC, Balter S, Brenner DJ, Carr JJ, Cerqueira MD, Chen J, Einstein AJ, Krumholz HM, Mahesh M, McCollough CH, Min JK, Morin RL, Nallamothu BK, Nasir K, Redberg RF, Shaw LJ, American Heart Association Council on Quality of Care and Outcomes Research, Council on Clinical Cardiology, and Council on Cardiovascular Radiology and Intervention
(2014) Circulation 130: 1730-48
MeSH Terms: American Heart Association, Cardiology, Cardiovascular Diseases, Education, Medical, Humans, Radiation Dosage, Radiation Injuries, Radiography, United States
Show Abstract · Added August 24, 2015
Education, justification, and optimization are the cornerstones to enhancing the radiation safety of medical imaging. Education regarding the benefits and risks of imaging and the principles of radiation safety is required for all clinicians in order for them to be able to use imaging optimally. Empowering patients with knowledge of the benefits and risks of imaging will facilitate their meaningful participation in decisions related to their health care, which is necessary to achieve patient-centered care. Limiting the use of imaging to appropriate clinical indications can ensure that the benefits of imaging outweigh any potential risks. Finally, the continually expanding repertoire of techniques that allow high-quality imaging with lower radiation exposure should be used when available to achieve safer imaging. The implementation of these strategies in practice is necessary to achieve high-quality, patient-centered imaging and will require a shared effort and investment by all stakeholders, including physicians, patients, national scientific and educational organizations, politicians, and industry.
0 Communities
1 Members
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9 MeSH Terms
Challenges facing early career academic cardiologists.
Tong CW, Ahmad T, Brittain EL, Bunch TJ, Damp JB, Dardas T, Hijar A, Hill JA, Hilliard AA, Houser SR, Jahangir E, Kates AM, Kim D, Lindman BR, Ryan JJ, Rzeszut AK, Sivaram CA, Valente AM, Freeman AM
(2014) J Am Coll Cardiol 63: 2199-208
MeSH Terms: Academic Medical Centers, Cardiology, Career Choice, Humans, Mentors, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (U.S.), Physicians, United States
Show Abstract · Added May 4, 2014
Early career academic cardiologists currently face unprecedented challenges that threaten a highly valued career path. A team consisting of early career professionals and senior leadership members of American College of Cardiology completed this white paper to inform the cardiovascular medicine profession regarding the plight of early career cardiologists and to suggest possible solutions. This paper includes: 1) definition of categories of early career academic cardiologists; 2) general challenges to all categories and specific challenges to each category; 3) obstacles as identified by a survey of current early career members of the American College of Cardiology; 4) major reasons for the failure of physician-scientists to receive funding from National Institute of Health/National Heart Lung and Blood Institute career development grants; 5) potential solutions; and 6) a call to action with specific recommendations.
Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
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8 MeSH Terms
2014 AHA/ACC/HRS guideline for the management of patients with atrial fibrillation: executive summary: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on practice guidelines and the Heart Rhythm Society.
January CT, Wann LS, Alpert JS, Calkins H, Cigarroa JE, Cleveland JC, Conti JB, Ellinor PT, Ezekowitz MD, Field ME, Murray KT, Sacco RL, Stevenson WG, Tchou PJ, Tracy CM, Yancy CW, ACC/AHA Task Force Members
(2014) Circulation 130: 2071-104
MeSH Terms: Advisory Committees, American Heart Association, Atrial Fibrillation, Cardiology, Evidence-Based Medicine, Humans, United States
Added May 27, 2014
0 Communities
1 Members
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7 MeSH Terms