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Mutational landscape of EGFR-, MYC-, and Kras-driven genetically engineered mouse models of lung adenocarcinoma.
McFadden DG, Politi K, Bhutkar A, Chen FK, Song X, Pirun M, Santiago PM, Kim-Kiselak C, Platt JT, Lee E, Hodges E, Rosebrock AP, Bronson RT, Socci ND, Hannon GJ, Jacks T, Varmus H
(2016) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 113: E6409-E6417
MeSH Terms: Adenocarcinoma, Adenocarcinoma of Lung, Animals, Carcinogens, Cell Transformation, Neoplastic, DNA Copy Number Variations, DNA Mutational Analysis, Disease Models, Animal, ErbB Receptors, Gene Dosage, Genes, myc, Genes, ras, Genome-Wide Association Study, Lung Neoplasms, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, Mutation, Point Mutation, ROC Curve, Whole Exome Sequencing
Show Abstract · Added April 26, 2017
Genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) of cancer are increasingly being used to assess putative driver mutations identified by large-scale sequencing of human cancer genomes. To accurately interpret experiments that introduce additional mutations, an understanding of the somatic genetic profile and evolution of GEMM tumors is necessary. Here, we performed whole-exome sequencing of tumors from three GEMMs of lung adenocarcinoma driven by mutant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), mutant Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (Kras), or overexpression of MYC proto-oncogene. Tumors from EGFR- and Kras-driven models exhibited, respectively, 0.02 and 0.07 nonsynonymous mutations per megabase, a dramatically lower average mutational frequency than observed in human lung adenocarcinomas. Tumors from models driven by strong cancer drivers (mutant EGFR and Kras) harbored few mutations in known cancer genes, whereas tumors driven by MYC, a weaker initiating oncogene in the murine lung, acquired recurrent clonal oncogenic Kras mutations. In addition, although EGFR- and Kras-driven models both exhibited recurrent whole-chromosome DNA copy number alterations, the specific chromosomes altered by gain or loss were different in each model. These data demonstrate that GEMM tumors exhibit relatively simple somatic genotypes compared with human cancers of a similar type, making these autochthonous model systems useful for additive engineering approaches to assess the potential of novel mutations on tumorigenesis, cancer progression, and drug sensitivity.
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20 MeSH Terms
Effects of Repeated Anesthesia Containing Urethane on Tumor Formation and Health Scores in Male C57BL/6J Mice.
Rex TS, Boyd K, Apple T, Bricker-Anthony C, Vail K, Wallace J
(2016) J Am Assoc Lab Anim Sci 55: 295-9
MeSH Terms: Anesthetics, Animals, Carcinogens, Ketamine, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Neoplasms, Urethane, Xylazine
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
Repeated injection of urethane (ethyl carbamate) is carcinogenic in susceptible strains of mice. Most recent cancer studies involving urethane-induced tumor formation use p53(+/-) mice, which lack one copy of the p53 tumor suppressor gene. In contrast, the same protocol elicits at most a single tumor in wildtype C57BL/6 mice. The effect of repeatedly injecting urethane as a component of a ketamine-xylazine anesthetic mixture in the highly prevalent mouse strain C57BL/6 is unknown. Male C57BL/6J mice (n = 30; age, 3 mo) were anesthetized once monthly for 4 mo by using 560 mg/kg urethane, 28 mg/kg ketamine, and 5.6 mg/kg xylazine. The physical health of the mice was evaluated according to 2 published scoring systems. The average body condition score (scale, 1 to 5; normal, 3) was 3.3, 3.3, and 3.4 after the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th injections, respectively. The visual assessment score was 0 (that is, normal) at all time points examined. Within 1 wk after the 4th injection, the mice were euthanized, necropsied, and evaluated histopathologically. No histopathologic findings were noteworthy. We conclude that repeated monthly injection with urethane as a component of an anesthetic cocktail does not cause clinically detectable abnormalities or induce neoplasia in C57BL/6J mice. These findings are important because urethane combined with low-dose ketamine, unlike other anesthetic regimens, allows for accurate recording of neuronal activity in both the brain and retina. Longitudinal neuronal recordings minimize the number of mice needed and improve the analysis of disease progression and potential therapeutic interventions.
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Western diet enhances benzo(a)pyrene-induced colon tumorigenesis in a polyposis in rat coli (PIRC) rat model of colon cancer.
Harris KL, Pulliam SR, Okoro E, Guo Z, Washington MK, Adunyah SE, Amos-Landgraf JM, Ramesh A
(2016) Oncotarget 7: 28947-60
MeSH Terms: Animals, Benzo(a)pyrene, Carcinogens, Colonic Neoplasms, Diet, Western, Disease Models, Animal, Male, Rats, Rats, Mutant Strains
Show Abstract · Added April 12, 2016
Consumption of Western diet (WD), contaminated with environmental toxicants, has been implicated as one of the risk factors for sporadic colon cancer. Our earlier studies using a mouse model revealed that compared to unsaturated dietary fat, the saturated dietary fat exacerbated the development of colon tumors caused by B(a)P. The objective of this study was to study how WD potentiates B(a)P-induced colon carcinogenesis in the adult male rats that carry a mutation in the Apc locus - the polyposis in the rat colon (PIRC) rats. Groups of PIRC rats were fed with AIN-76A standard diet (RD) or Western diet (WD) and received 25, 50, or 100 μg B(a)P/kg body weight (wt) via oral gavage for 60 days. Subsequent to exposure, rats were euthanized; colons were retrieved and preserved in 10% formalin for counting the polyp numbers, measuring the polyp size, and histological analyses. Blood samples were collected and concentrations of cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, insulin and leptin were measured. Rats that received WD + B(a)P showed increased levels of cholesterol, triglycerides, and leptin in comparison to RD + B(a)P groups or controls. The colon tumor numbers showed a B(a)P dose-response relationship. Adenomas with high grade dysplasia were prominent in B(a)P + WD rats compared to B(a)P + RD rats and controls (p < 0.05). The larger rat model system used in this study allows for studying more advanced tumor phenotypes over a longer duration and delineating the role of diet - toxicant interactions in sporadic colon tumor development.
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Olive oil prevents benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P]-induced colon carcinogenesis through altered B(a)P metabolism and decreased oxidative damage in Apc(Min) mouse model.
Banks LD, Amoah P, Niaz MS, Washington MK, Adunyah SE, Ramesh A
(2016) J Nutr Biochem 28: 37-50
MeSH Terms: Animals, Benzo(a)pyrene, Carcinogens, Colonic Neoplasms, Disease Models, Animal, Genes, APC, Mice, Olive Oil, Oxidative Stress
Show Abstract · Added February 22, 2016
Colon cancer ranks third in cancer-related mortalities in the United States. Many studies have investigated factors that contribute to colon cancer in which dietary and environmental factors have been shown to play an integral role in the etiology of this disease. Specifically, human dietary intake of environmental carcinogens such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons has generated interest in looking at how it exerts its effects in gastrointestinal carcinogenesis. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the preventative effects of olive oil on benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P]-induced colon carcinogenesis in adult Apc(Min) mice. Mice were assigned to a control (n=8) or treatment group (n=8) consisting of 25, 50 and 100-μg B(a)P/kg body weight (bw) dissolved in tricaprylin [B(a)P-only group] or olive oil daily via oral gavage for 60 days. Our studies showed that Apc(Min) mice exposed to B(a)P developed a significantly higher number (P<0.05) of larger dysplastic adenomas compared to those exposed to B(a)P + olive oil. Treatment of mice with B(a)P and olive oil significantly altered (P<0.05) the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes in both the colon and liver tissues. However, only GST activity was significantly higher (P<0.05) in the liver of mice treated with 50- and 100-μg B(a)P/kg bw + olive oil. Lastly, olive oil promoted rapid detoxification of B(a)P by decreasing its organic metabolite concentrations and also decreasing the extent of DNA damage to colon and liver tissues (P<0.05). These results suggest that olive oil has a protective effect against B(a)P-induced colon tumors.
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Assessing the carcinogenic potential of low-dose exposures to chemical mixtures in the environment: the challenge ahead.
Goodson WH, Lowe L, Carpenter DO, Gilbertson M, Manaf Ali A, Lopez de Cerain Salsamendi A, Lasfar A, Carnero A, Azqueta A, Amedei A, Charles AK, Collins AR, Ward A, Salzberg AC, Colacci A, Olsen AK, Berg A, Barclay BJ, Zhou BP, Blanco-Aparicio C, Baglole CJ, Dong C, Mondello C, Hsu CW, Naus CC, Yedjou C, Curran CS, Laird DW, Koch DC, Carlin DJ, Felsher DW, Roy D, Brown DG, Ratovitski E, Ryan EP, Corsini E, Rojas E, Moon EY, Laconi E, Marongiu F, Al-Mulla F, Chiaradonna F, Darroudi F, Martin FL, Van Schooten FJ, Goldberg GS, Wagemaker G, Nangami GN, Calaf GM, Williams G, Wolf GT, Koppen G, Brunborg G, Lyerly HK, Krishnan H, Ab Hamid H, Yasaei H, Sone H, Kondoh H, Salem HK, Hsu HY, Park HH, Koturbash I, Miousse IR, Scovassi AI, Klaunig JE, Vondráček J, Raju J, Roman J, Wise JP, Whitfield JR, Woodrick J, Christopher JA, Ochieng J, Martinez-Leal JF, Weisz J, Kravchenko J, Sun J, Prudhomme KR, Narayanan KB, Cohen-Solal KA, Moorwood K, Gonzalez L, Soucek L, Jian L, D'Abronzo LS, Lin LT, Li L, Gulliver L, McCawley LJ, Memeo L, Vermeulen L, Leyns L, Zhang L, Valverde M, Khatami M, Romano MF, Chapellier M, Williams MA, Wade M, Manjili MH, Lleonart ME, Xia M, Gonzalez MJ, Karamouzis MV, Kirsch-Volders M, Vaccari M, Kuemmerle NB, Singh N, Cruickshanks N, Kleinstreuer N, van Larebeke N, Ahmed N, Ogunkua O, Krishnakumar PK, Vadgama P, Marignani PA, Ghosh PM, Ostrosky-Wegman P, Thompson PA, Dent P, Heneberg P, Darbre P, Sing Leung P, Nangia-Makker P, Cheng QS, Robey RB, Al-Temaimi R, Roy R, Andrade-Vieira R, Sinha RK, Mehta R, Vento R, Di Fiore R, Ponce-Cusi R, Dornetshuber-Fleiss R, Nahta R, Castellino RC, Palorini R, Abd Hamid R, Langie SA, Eltom SE, Brooks SA, Ryeom S, Wise SS, Bay SN, Harris SA, Papagerakis S, Romano S, Pavanello S, Eriksson S, Forte S, Casey SC, Luanpitpong S, Lee TJ, Otsuki T, Chen T, Massfelder T, Sanderson T, Guarnieri T, Hultman T, Dormoy V, Odero-Marah V, Sabbisetti V, Maguer-Satta V, Rathmell WK, Engström W, Decker WK, Bisson WH, Rojanasakul Y, Luqmani Y, Chen Z, Hu Z
(2015) Carcinogenesis 36 Suppl 1: S254-96
MeSH Terms: Animals, Carcinogenesis, Carcinogens, Environmental, Environmental Exposure, Hazardous Substances, Humans, Neoplasms
Show Abstract · Added October 17, 2015
Lifestyle factors are responsible for a considerable portion of cancer incidence worldwide, but credible estimates from the World Health Organization and the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) suggest that the fraction of cancers attributable to toxic environmental exposures is between 7% and 19%. To explore the hypothesis that low-dose exposures to mixtures of chemicals in the environment may be combining to contribute to environmental carcinogenesis, we reviewed 11 hallmark phenotypes of cancer, multiple priority target sites for disruption in each area and prototypical chemical disruptors for all targets, this included dose-response characterizations, evidence of low-dose effects and cross-hallmark effects for all targets and chemicals. In total, 85 examples of chemicals were reviewed for actions on key pathways/mechanisms related to carcinogenesis. Only 15% (13/85) were found to have evidence of a dose-response threshold, whereas 59% (50/85) exerted low-dose effects. No dose-response information was found for the remaining 26% (22/85). Our analysis suggests that the cumulative effects of individual (non-carcinogenic) chemicals acting on different pathways, and a variety of related systems, organs, tissues and cells could plausibly conspire to produce carcinogenic synergies. Additional basic research on carcinogenesis and research focused on low-dose effects of chemical mixtures needs to be rigorously pursued before the merits of this hypothesis can be further advanced. However, the structure of the World Health Organization International Programme on Chemical Safety 'Mode of Action' framework should be revisited as it has inherent weaknesses that are not fully aligned with our current understanding of cancer biology.
© The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.
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Assessing the carcinogenic potential of low-dose exposures to chemical mixtures in the environment: focus on the cancer hallmark of tumor angiogenesis.
Hu Z, Brooks SA, Dormoy V, Hsu CW, Hsu HY, Lin LT, Massfelder T, Rathmell WK, Xia M, Al-Mulla F, Al-Temaimi R, Amedei A, Brown DG, Prudhomme KR, Colacci A, Hamid RA, Mondello C, Raju J, Ryan EP, Woodrick J, Scovassi AI, Singh N, Vaccari M, Roy R, Forte S, Memeo L, Salem HK, Lowe L, Jensen L, Bisson WH, Kleinstreuer N
(2015) Carcinogenesis 36 Suppl 1: S184-202
MeSH Terms: Animals, Carcinogenesis, Carcinogens, Environmental, Environmental Exposure, Hazardous Substances, Humans, Neoplasms, Neovascularization, Pathologic
Show Abstract · Added October 17, 2015
One of the important 'hallmarks' of cancer is angiogenesis, which is the process of formation of new blood vessels that are necessary for tumor expansion, invasion and metastasis. Under normal physiological conditions, angiogenesis is well balanced and controlled by endogenous proangiogenic factors and antiangiogenic factors. However, factors produced by cancer cells, cancer stem cells and other cell types in the tumor stroma can disrupt the balance so that the tumor microenvironment favors tumor angiogenesis. These factors include vascular endothelial growth factor, endothelial tissue factor and other membrane bound receptors that mediate multiple intracellular signaling pathways that contribute to tumor angiogenesis. Though environmental exposures to certain chemicals have been found to initiate and promote tumor development, the role of these exposures (particularly to low doses of multiple substances), is largely unknown in relation to tumor angiogenesis. This review summarizes the evidence of the role of environmental chemical bioactivity and exposure in tumor angiogenesis and carcinogenesis. We identify a number of ubiquitous (prototypical) chemicals with disruptive potential that may warrant further investigation given their selectivity for high-throughput screening assay targets associated with proangiogenic pathways. We also consider the cross-hallmark relationships of a number of important angiogenic pathway targets with other cancer hallmarks and we make recommendations for future research. Understanding of the role of low-dose exposure of chemicals with disruptive potential could help us refine our approach to cancer risk assessment, and may ultimately aid in preventing cancer by reducing or eliminating exposures to synergistic mixtures of chemicals with carcinogenic potential.
© The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.
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Carcinogenesis of urethane: simulation versus experiment.
Lajovic A, Nagy LD, Guengerich FP, Bren U
(2015) Chem Res Toxicol 28: 691-701
MeSH Terms: Carcinogenesis, Carcinogens, DNA, Hydrolysis, Quantum Theory, Thermodynamics, Urethane
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
The carcinogenesis of urethane (ethyl carbamate), a byproduct of fermentation that is consistently found in various food products, was investigated with a combination of kinetic experiments and quantum chemical calculations. The main objective of the study was to find ΔG(⧧), the activation free energy for the rate-limiting step of the SN2 reaction among the ultimate carcinogen of urethane, vinyl carbamate epoxide (VCE), and different nucleobases of the DNA. In the experimental part, the second-order reaction rate constants for the formation of the main 7-(2-oxoethyl)guanine adduct in aqueous solutions of deoxyguanosine and in DNA were determined. A series of ab initio, density functional theory (DFT), and semiempirical molecular orbital (MO) calculations was then performed to determine the activation barriers for the reaction between VCE and nucleobases methylguanine, methyladenine, and methylcytosine. Effects of hydration were incorporated with the use of the solvent reaction field method of Tomasi and co-workers and the Langevine dipoles model of Florian and Warshel. The computational results for the main adduct were found to be in good agreement with the experiment, thus presenting strong evidence for the validity of the proposed SN2 mechanism. This allowed us to predict the activation barriers of reactions leading to side products for which kinetic experiments have not yet been performed. Our calculations have shown that the main 7-(2-oxoethyl)deoxyguanosine adduct indeed forms preferentially because the emergence of other adducts either proceeds across a significantly higher activation barrier or the geometry of the reaction requires the Watson-Crick pairs of the DNA to be broken. The computational study also considered the questions of stereoselectivity, the ease of the elimination of the leaving group, and the relative contributions of the two possible reaction paths for the formation of the 1,N(2)-ethenodeoxyguanosine adduct.
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Impact of structural and metabolic variations on the toxicity and carcinogenicity of hydroxy- and alkoxy-substituted allyl- and propenylbenzenes.
Rietjens IM, Cohen SM, Fukushima S, Gooderham NJ, Hecht S, Marnett LJ, Smith RL, Adams TB, Bastaki M, Harman CG, Taylor SV
(2014) Chem Res Toxicol 27: 1092-103
MeSH Terms: Animals, Benzene Derivatives, Biotransformation, Carcinogens, Humans
Show Abstract · Added June 1, 2014
The metabolic fate of a compound is determined by numerous factors including its chemical structure. Although the metabolic options for a variety of functional groups are well understood and can often provide a rationale for the comparison of toxicity based on structural analogy, at times quite minor structural variations may have major consequences for metabolic outcomes and toxicity. In this perspective, the effects of structural variations on metabolic outcomes is detailed for a group of related hydroxy- and alkoxy-substituted allyl- and propenylbenzenes. These classes of compounds are naturally occurring constituents of a variety of botanical-based food items. The classes vary from one another by the presence or absence of alkylation of their para-hydroxyl substituents and/or the position of the double bond in the alkyl side chain. We provide an overview of how these subtle structural variations alter the metabolism of these important food-borne compounds, ultimately influencing their toxicity, particularly their DNA reactivity and carcinogenic potential. The data reveal that detailed knowledge of the consequences of subtle structural variations for metabolism is essential for adequate comparison of structurally related chemicals. Taken together, it is concluded that predictions in toxicological risk assessment should not be performed on the basis of structural analogy only but should include an analogy of metabolic pathways across compounds and species.
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Structures of exocyclic R,R- and S,S-N(6),N(6)-(2,3-dihydroxybutan-1,4-diyl)-2'-deoxyadenosine adducts induced by 1,2,3,4-diepoxybutane.
Kowal EA, Seneviratne U, Wickramaratne S, Doherty KE, Cao X, Tretyakova N, Stone MP
(2014) Chem Res Toxicol 27: 805-17
MeSH Terms: Air Pollutants, Base Sequence, Carcinogens, DNA Adducts, Deoxyadenosines, Epoxy Compounds, Humans, Models, Molecular, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Biomolecular, Tobacco Smoke Pollution
Show Abstract · Added May 29, 2014
1,3-Butadiene (BD) is an industrial and environmental chemical present in urban air and cigarette smoke, and is classified as a human carcinogen. It is oxidized by cytochrome P450 to form 1,2,3,4-diepoxybutane (DEB); DEB bis-alkylates the N(6) position of adenine in DNA. Two enantiomers of bis-N(6)-dA adducts of DEB have been identified: R,R-N(6),N(6)-(2,3-dihydroxybutan-1,4-diyl)-2'-deoxyadenosine (R,R-DHB-dA), and S,S-N(6),N(6)-(2,3-dihydroxybutan-1,4-diyl)-2'-deoxyadenosine (S,S-DHB-dA) [ Seneviratne , U. , Antsypovich , S. , Dorr , D. Q. , Dissanayake , T. , Kotapati , S. , and Tretyakova , N. ( 2010 ) Chem. Res. Toxicol. 23 , 1556 -1567 ]. Herein, the R,R-DHB-dA and S,S-DHB-dA adducts have been incorporated into the 5'-d(C(1)G(2)G(3)A(4)C(5)X(6)A(7)G(8)A(9)A(10)G(11))-3':5'-d(C(12)T(13)T(14)C(15)T(16)T(17)G(18)T(19)C(20)C(21)G(22))-3' duplex [X(6) = R,R-DHB-dA (R(6)) or S,S-DHB-dA (S(6))]. The structures of the duplexes were determined by molecular dynamics calculations, which were restrained by experimental distances obtained from NMR data. Both the R,R- and S,S-DHB-dA adducts are positioned in the major groove of DNA. In both instances, the bulky 3,4-dihydroxypyrrolidine rings are accommodated by an out-of-plane rotation about the C6-N(6) bond of the bis-alkylated adenine. In both instances, the directionality of the dihydroxypyrrolidine ring is evidenced by the pattern of NOEs between the 3,4-dihydroxypyrrolidine protons and DNA. Also in both instances, the anti conformation of the glycosyl bond is maintained, which combined with the out-of-plane rotation about the C6-N(6) bond, allows the complementary thymine, T(17), to remain stacked within the duplex, and form one hydrogen bond with the modified base, between the imine nitrogen of the modified base and the T(17) N3H imino proton. The loss of the second Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding interaction at the lesion sites correlates with the lower thermal stabilities of the R,R- and S,S-DHB-dA duplexes, as compared to the corresponding unmodified duplex. The reduced base stacking at the adduct sites may also contribute to the thermal instability.
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Influence of dietary fat type on benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P] biotransformation in a B(a)P-induced mouse model of colon cancer.
Diggs DL, Myers JN, Banks LD, Niaz MS, Hood DB, Roberts LJ, Ramesh A
(2013) J Nutr Biochem 24: 2051-63
MeSH Terms: Animals, Aryl Hydrocarbon Hydroxylases, Benzo(a)pyrene, Biotransformation, Carcinogens, Chromatography, Thin Layer, Colon, Colonic Neoplasms, Cytochrome P-450 CYP1B1, DNA Adducts, Dietary Fats, Disease Models, Animal, Liver, Male, Mice
Show Abstract · Added March 7, 2014
In the US alone, around 60,000 lives/year are lost due to colon cancer. Diet and environment have been implicated in the development of sporadic colon tumors. The objective of this study was to determine how dietary fat potentiates the development of colon tumors through altered B(a)P biotransformation, using the Adenomatous polyposis coli with Multiple intestinal neoplasia mouse model. Benzo(a)pyrene was administered to mice through tricaprylin, and unsaturated (USF; peanut oil) and saturated (SF; coconut oil) fats at doses of 50 and 100 μg/kg via oral gavage over a 60-day period. Blood, colon, and liver were collected at the end of exposure period. The expression of B(a)P biotransformation enzymes [cytochrome P450 (CYP)1A1, CYP1B1 and glutathione-S-transferase] in liver and colon were assayed at the level of protein, mRNA and activities. Plasma and tissue samples were analyzed by reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography for B(a)P metabolites. Additionally, DNA isolated from colon and liver tissues was analyzed for B(a)P-induced DNA adducts by the (32)P-postlabeling method using a thin-layer chromatography system. Benzo(a)pyrene exposure through dietary fat altered its metabolic fate in a dose-dependent manner, with 100 μg/kg dose group registering an elevated expression of B(a)P biotransformation enzymes, and greater concentration of B(a)P metabolites, compared to the 50 μg/kg dose group (P<.05). This effect was more pronounced for SF group compared to USF group (P<.05). These findings establish that SF causes sustained induction of B(a)P biotransformation enzymes and extensive metabolism of this toxicant. As a consequence, B(a)P metabolites were generated to a greater extent in colon and liver, whose concentrations also registered a dose-dependent increase. These metabolites were found to bind with DNA and form B(a)P-DNA adducts, which may have contributed to colon tumors in a subchronic exposure regimen.
© 2013.
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