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Human interventions to characterize novel relationships between the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and parathyroid hormone.
Brown JM, Williams JS, Luther JM, Garg R, Garza AE, Pojoga LH, Ruan DT, Williams GH, Adler GK, Vaidya A
(2014) Hypertension 63: 273-80
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aldosterone, Angiotensin II, Antihypertensive Agents, Captopril, Diuretics, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Female, Humans, Hyperaldosteronism, Hypertension, Male, Middle Aged, Parathyroid Glands, Parathyroid Hormone, Renin-Angiotensin System, Spironolactone, Vasoconstrictor Agents, Vitamin D
Show Abstract · Added October 27, 2014
Observational studies in primary hyperaldosteronism suggest a positive relationship between aldosterone and parathyroid hormone (PTH); however, interventions to better characterize the physiological relationship between the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) and PTH are needed. We evaluated the effect of individual RAAS components on PTH using 4 interventions in humans without primary hyperaldosteronism. PTH was measured before and after study (1) low-dose angiotensin II (Ang II) infusion (1 ng/kg per minute) and captopril administration (25 mg×1); study (2) high-dose Ang II infusion (3 ng/kg per minute); study (3) blinded crossover randomization to aldosterone infusion (0.7 µg/kg per hour) and vehicle; and study (4) blinded randomization to spironolactone (50 mg/daily) or placebo for 6 weeks. Infusion of Ang II at 1 ng/kg per minute acutely increased aldosterone (+148%) and PTH (+10.3%), whereas Ang II at 3 ng/kg per minute induced larger incremental changes in aldosterone (+241%) and PTH (+36%; P<0.01). Captopril acutely decreased aldosterone (-12%) and PTH (-9.7%; P<0.01). In contrast, aldosterone infusion robustly raised serum aldosterone (+892%) without modifying PTH. However, spironolactone therapy during 6 weeks modestly lowered PTH when compared with placebo (P<0.05). In vitro studies revealed the presence of Ang II type I and mineralocorticoid receptor mRNA and protein expression in normal and adenomatous human parathyroid tissues. We observed novel pleiotropic relationships between RAAS components and the regulation of PTH in individuals without primary hyperaldosteronism: the acute modulation of PTH by the RAAS seems to be mediated by Ang II, whereas the long-term influence of the RAAS on PTH may involve aldosterone. Future studies to evaluate the impact of RAAS inhibitors in treating PTH-mediated disorders are warranted.
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19 MeSH Terms
Angiotensin II, independent of plasma renin activity, contributes to the hypertension of autonomic failure.
Arnold AC, Okamoto LE, Gamboa A, Shibao C, Raj SR, Robertson D, Biaggioni I
(2013) Hypertension 61: 701-6
MeSH Terms: Aged, Aldosterone, Angiotensin II, Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers, Antihypertensive Agents, Captopril, Double-Blind Method, Female, Humans, Hypertension, Losartan, Male, Middle Aged, Orthostatic Intolerance, Pure Autonomic Failure, Renin, Sodium
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
At least half of primary autonomic failure patients exhibit supine hypertension, despite profound impairments in sympathetic activity. Although the mechanisms underlying this hypertension are unknown, plasma renin activity is often undetectable, suggesting renin-angiotensin (Ang) pathways are not involved. However, because aldosterone levels are preserved, we tested the hypothesis that Ang II is intact and contributes to the hypertension of autonomic failure. Indeed, circulating Ang II was paradoxically increased in hypertensive autonomic failure patients (52±5 pg/mL, n=11) compared with matched healthy controls (27±4 pg/mL, n=10; P=0.002), despite similarly low renin activity (0.19±0.06 versus 0.34±0.13 ng/mL per hour, respectively; P=0.449). To determine the contribution of Ang II to supine hypertension in these patients, we administered the AT(1) receptor blocker losartan (50 mg) at bedtime in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study (n=11). Losartan maximally reduced systolic blood pressure by 32±11 mm Hg at 6 hours after administration (P<0.05), decreased nocturnal urinary sodium excretion (P=0.0461), and did not worsen morning orthostatic tolerance. In contrast, there was no effect of captopril on supine blood pressure in a subset of these patients. These findings suggest that Ang II formation in autonomic failure is independent of plasma renin activity, and perhaps Ang-converting enzyme. Furthermore, these studies suggest that elevations in Ang II contribute to the hypertension of autonomic failure, and provide rationale for the use of AT(1) receptor blockers for treatment of these patients.
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17 MeSH Terms
Role of blood pressure and the renin-angiotensin system in development of diabetic nephropathy (DN) in eNOS-/- db/db mice.
Zhang MZ, Wang S, Yang S, Yang H, Fan X, Takahashi T, Harris RC
(2012) Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 302: F433-8
MeSH Terms: Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors, Animals, Antihypertensive Agents, Blood Pressure, Captopril, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Diabetic Nephropathies, Hydralazine, Hydrochlorothiazide, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Nitric Oxide Synthase Type III, Renin-Angiotensin System, Reserpine
Show Abstract · Added February 26, 2014
Randomized clinical trials have clearly shown that inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) will slow the rate of progression of diabetic nephropathy, but controversy remains about whether the observed beneficial effects result from more than control of blood pressure. Deletion of eNOS in a model of type II diabetes, db/db mice (eNOS(-/-) db/db), induces an accelerated nephropathy and provides an excellent model of human diabetic nephropathy. As is frequently seen in type II diabetes, blood pressure is moderately elevated in eNOS(-/-) db/db mice. To determine the role of elevated blood pressure per se vs. additional deleterious effects of the RAS in mediation of disease progression, 8-wk-old eNOS(-/-) db/db mice were randomly divided into three groups: vehicle, treatment with the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) captopril, or treatment with "triple therapy" (hydralazine, resperine, hydrocholorothiazide), and the animals were euthanized after treatment for 12 wk. Blood pressure was reduced to comparable levels with ACE inhibition or triple therapy. Although both treatment regimens decreased development of diabetic nephropathy, ACE inhibition led to more profound reductions in albuminuria, glomerulosclerosis, markers of tubulointerstitial injury, macrophage infiltration, and markers of inflammation. Therefore, this animal model suggests that while there is an important role for blood pressure control, RAS blockade provides additional benefits in slowing the progression of diabetic nephropathy.
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14 MeSH Terms
Overproduction of angiotensinogen from adipose tissue induces adipose inflammation, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance.
Kalupahana NS, Massiera F, Quignard-Boulange A, Ailhaud G, Voy BH, Wasserman DH, Moustaid-Moussa N
(2012) Obesity (Silver Spring) 20: 48-56
MeSH Terms: 3T3-L1 Cells, Adipocytes, Adipose Tissue, Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors, Angiotensinogen, Animals, Captopril, Glucose Intolerance, Glycerolphosphate Dehydrogenase, Inflammation, Insulin Resistance, Interleukin-10, Male, Mice, Muscle, Skeletal, NF-kappa B, Obesity, Up-Regulation
Show Abstract · Added July 21, 2014
Although obesity is associated with overactivation of the white adipose tissue (WAT) renin-angiotensin system (RAS), a causal link between the latter and systemic insulin resistance is not established. We tested the hypothesis that overexpression of angiotensinogen (Agt) from WAT causes systemic insulin resistance via modulation of adipose inflammation. Glucose tolerance, systemic insulin sensitivity, and WAT inflammatory markers were analyzed in mice overexpressing Agt in the WAT (aP2-Agt mice). Proteomic studies and in vitro studies using 3T3-L1 adipocytes were performed to build a mechanistic framework. Male aP2-Agt mice exhibited glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, and lower insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by the skeletal muscle. The difference in glucose tolerance between genotypes was normalized by high-fat (HF) feeding, and was significantly improved by treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor captopril. aP2-Agt mice also had higher monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and lower interleukin-10 (IL-10) in the WAT, indicating adipose inflammation. Proteomic studies in WAT showed that they also had higher monoglyceride lipase (MGL) and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase levels. Treatment with angiotensin II (Ang II) increased MCP-1 and resistin secretion from adipocytes, which was prevented by cotreating with inhibitors of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway or nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase. In conclusion, we show for the first time that adipose RAS overactivation causes glucose intolerance and systemic insulin resistance. The mechanisms appear to be via reduced skeletal muscle glucose uptake, at least in part due to Ang II-induced, NADPH oxidase and NFκB-dependent increases in WAT inflammation.
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18 MeSH Terms
Dipeptidyl peptidase IV deficiency increases susceptibility to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-induced peritracheal edema.
Byrd JB, Shreevatsa A, Putlur P, Foretia D, McAlexander L, Sinha T, Does MD, Brown NJ
(2007) J Allergy Clin Immunol 120: 403-8
MeSH Terms: Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors, Animals, Animals, Genetically Modified, Blood Pressure, Captopril, Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4, Dipeptidyl-Peptidases and Tripeptidyl-Peptidases, Disease Susceptibility, Edema, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Rats, Rats, Inbred F344, Tracheal Diseases
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
BACKGROUND - Serum dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV) activity is decreased in some individuals with ACE inhibitor-associated angioedema. ACE and DPPIV degrade substance P, an edema-forming peptide. The contribution of impaired degradation of substance P by DPPIV to the pathogenesis of ACE inhibitor-associated angioedema is unknown.
OBJECTIVES - We sought to determine whether DPPIV deficiency results in increased edema formation during ACE inhibition. We also sought to develop an animal model using magnetic resonance imaging to quantify ACE inhibitor-induced edema.
METHODS - The effect of genetic DPPIV deficiency on peritracheal edema was assessed in F344 rats after treatment with saline, captopril (2.5 mg/kg), or captopril plus the neurokinin receptor antagonist spantide (100 mug/kg) by using serial T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging.
RESULTS - Serum dipeptidyl peptidase activity was dramatically decreased in DPPIV-deficient rats (P < .001). The volume of peritracheal edema was significantly greater in captopril-treated DPPIV-deficient rats than in saline-treated DPPIV-deficient rats (P = .001), saline-treated rats of the normal substrain (P < .001), or captopril-treated rats of the normal substrain (P = .001). Cotreatment with spantide attenuated peritracheal edema in captopril-treated DPPIV-deficient rats (P = .005 vs captopril-treated DPPIV-deficient rats and P = .57 vs saline-treated DPPIV-deficient rats).
CONCLUSIONS - DPPIV deficiency predisposes to peritracheal edema formation when ACE is inhibited through a neurokinin receptor-dependent mechanism. Magnetic resonance imaging is useful for modeling ACE inhibitor-associated angioedema in rats.
CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS - Genetic or environmental factors that decrease DPPIV activity might increase the risk of ACE inhibitor-associated angioedema.
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14 MeSH Terms
Interactions between COX-2 and the renin-angiotensin system in the kidney.
Harris RC
(2003) Acta Physiol Scand 177: 423-7
MeSH Terms: Adrenalectomy, Angiotensin II, Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors, Animals, Captopril, Cyclooxygenase 2, Diet, Sodium-Restricted, Gene Deletion, Glucocorticoids, Isoenzymes, Kidney, Kidney Cortex, Kidney Medulla, Mice, Mineralocorticoids, Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases, RNA, Messenger, Renin, Renin-Angiotensin System
Show Abstract · Added August 19, 2013
AIM - In adult mammalian kidney, COX-2 expression is found in a restricted subpopulation of cells. The two sites of renal COX-2 localization detected in all species to date are the macula densa (MD) and associated cortical thick ascending limb cells (cTALH) and medullary interstitial cells. Physiological regulation of COX-2 in these cellular compartments suggests functional roles for eicosanoid products of the enzyme. In the MD region, COX-2 expression increases in high renin states [salt restriction, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition, renovascular hypertension], and selective COX-2 inhibitors significantly decrease plasma renin levels and renal renin activity and mRNA expression. An important role for COX-2-derived prostanoids in regulation of renin expression and secretion has also been determined by using mice with selective genetic deletion of either the COX-1 or COX-2 gene. There is evidence for negative regulation of MD/cTALH COX-2 by angiotensin II and by glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids, suggesting that in the kidney, cortical COX-2 expression is regulated in part by alterations in activity of the renin-angiotensin system.
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19 MeSH Terms
Prostaglandins that increase renin production in response to ACE inhibition are not derived from cyclooxygenase-1.
Cheng HF, Wang SW, Zhang MZ, McKanna JA, Breyer R, Harris RC
(2002) Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 283: R638-46
MeSH Terms: Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors, Animals, Captopril, Cyclooxygenase 1, Cyclooxygenase 2, Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors, Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors, Gene Deletion, Gene Expression, Isoenzymes, Juxtaglomerular Apparatus, Male, Membrane Proteins, Mice, Mice, Inbred Strains, Mice, Knockout, Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases, Prostaglandins, Pyrazoles, RNA, Messenger, Receptors, Prostaglandin E, Receptors, Prostaglandin E, EP2 Subtype, Renin, Sulfonamides
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
It is well known that nonselective, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs inhibit renal renin production. Our previous studies indicated that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI)-mediated renin increases were absent in rats treated with a cyclooxygenase (COX)-2-selective inhibitor and in COX-2 -/- mice. The current study examined further whether COX-1 is also involved in mediating ACEI-induced renin production. Because renin increases are mediated by cAMP, we also examined whether increased renin is mediated by the prostaglandin E(2) receptor EP(2) subtype, which is coupled to G(s) and increases cAMP. Therefore, we investigated if genetic deletion of COX-1 or EP(2) prevents increased ACEI-induced renin expression. Age- and gender-matched wild-type (+/+) and homozygous null mice (-/-) were administered captopril for 7 days, and plasma and renal renin levels and renal renin mRNA expression were measured. There were no significant differences in the basal level of renal renin activity from plasma or renal tissue in COX-1 +/+ and -/- mice. Captopril administration increased renin equally [plasma renin activity (PRA): +/+ 9.3 +/- 2.2 vs. 50.1 +/- 10.9; -/- 13.7 +/- 1.5 vs. 43.9 +/- 6.6 ng ANG I x ml(-1) x h(-1); renal renin concentration: +/+ 11.8 +/- 1.7 vs. 35.3 +/- 3.9; -/- 13.0 +/- 3.0 vs. 27.8 +/- 2.7 ng ANG I x mg protein(-1) x h(-1); n = 6; P < 0.05 with or without captopril]. ACEI also increased renin mRNA expression (+/+ 2.4 +/- 0.2; -/- 2.1 +/- 0.2 fold control; n = 6-10; P < 0.05). Captopril led to similar increases in EP(2) -/- compared with +/+. The COX-2 inhibitor SC-58236 blocked ACEI-induced elevation in renal renin concentration in EP(2) null mice (+/+ 24.7 +/- 1.7 vs. 9.8 +/- 0.4; -/- 21.1 +/- 3.2 vs. 9.3 +/- 0.4 ng ANG I x mg protein(-1) x h(-1); n = 5) as well as in COX-1 -/- mice (SC-58236-treated PRA: +/+ 7.3 +/- 0.6; -/- 8.0 +/- 0.9 ng ANG I x ml(-1) x h(-1); renal renin: +/+ 9.1 +/- 0.9; -/- 9.6 +/- 0.5 ng ANG I x mg protein(-1) x h(-1); n = 6-7; P < 0.05 compared with no treatment). Immunohistochemical analysis of renin expression confirmed the above results. This study provides definitive evidence that metabolites of COX-2 rather than COX-1 mediate ACEI-induced renin increases. The persistent response in EP(2) nulls suggests involvement of prostaglandin E(2) receptor subtype 4 and/or prostacyclin receptor (IP).
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24 MeSH Terms
Genetic deletion of COX-2 prevents increased renin expression in response to ACE inhibition.
Cheng HF, Wang JL, Zhang MZ, Wang SW, McKanna JA, Harris RC
(2001) Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 280: F449-56
MeSH Terms: Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors, Animals, Captopril, Cyclooxygenase 2, Gene Deletion, Genotype, Heterozygote, Homozygote, Isoenzymes, Kidney, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases, RNA, Messenger, Reference Values, Renin, Tissue Distribution
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is expressed in macula densa (MD) and surrounding cortical thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle (cTALH) and is involved in regulation of renin production. We and others have previously found that selective COX-2 inhibitors can inhibit renal renin production (Cheng HF, Wang JL, Zhang MZ, Miyazaki Y, Ichikawa I, McKanna JA, and Harris RC. J Clin Invest 103: 953-961, 1999; Harding P, Sigmon DH, Alfie ME, Huang PL, Fishman MC, Beierwaltes WH, and Carretero OA. Hypertension 29: 297-302, 1997; Traynor TR, Smart A, Briggs JP, and Schnermann J. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 277: F706-F710, 1999; Wang JL, Cheng HF, and Harris RC. Hypertension 34: 96-101, 1999). In the present studies, we utilized mice with genetic deletions of the COX-2 gene in order to investigate further the potential role of COX-2 in mediation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Age-matched wild-type (+/+), heterozygotes (+/-), and homozygous null mice (-/-) were administered the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI), captopril, for 7 days. ACEI failed to significantly increase plasma renin activity, renal renin mRNA expression, and renal renin activity in (-/-) mice. ACEI increased the number of cells expressing immunoreactive renin in the (+/+) mice both by inducing more juxtaglomerular cells to express immunoreactive renin and by recruiting additional renin-expressing cells in the more proximal afferent arteriole. In contrast, there was minimal recruitment of renin-expressing cells in the more proximal afferent arteriole of the -/- mice. In summary, these results indicate that ACEI-mediated increases in renal renin production were defective in COX-2 knockout (K/O) mice and provide further indication that MD COX-2 is an important mediator of the renin-angiotensin system.
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17 MeSH Terms
Nitric oxide regulates renal cortical cyclooxygenase-2 expression.
Cheng HF, Wang JL, Zhang MZ, McKanna JA, Harris RC
(2000) Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 279: F122-9
MeSH Terms: Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors, Animals, Captopril, Cells, Cultured, Citrulline, Cyclooxygenase 2, Dibutyryl Cyclic GMP, Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic, Immunohistochemistry, Indazoles, Isoenzymes, Kidney Cortex, Nitric Oxide, Nitric Oxide Donors, Nitric Oxide Synthase, Nitric Oxide Synthase Type I, Penicillamine, Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases, RNA, Messenger, Rabbits, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Sodium Chloride, Dietary, Thiourea
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
We have previously shown that cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is localized to the cortical thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle (cTALH)/macula densa of the rat kidney, and expression increases in response to low-salt diet and/or angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition. Because of the localization of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) to macula densa and surrounding cTALH, the present study investigated the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the regulation of COX-2 expression. For in vivo studies, rats were fed a normal diet, low-salt diet or low-salt diet combined with the ACE inhibitor captopril. In each group, one-half of them were treated with the nNOS inhibitors 7-nitroinidazole (7-NI) or S-methyl-thiocitrulline. Both of these NOS inhibitors inhibited increases in COX-2 mRNA and immunoreactive protein in response to low salt and low salt+captopril. For in vitro studies, COX-2 expression was studied in primary cultures of rabbit cTALH cells immunodisssected with Tamm-Horsfall antibody. Basal COX-2 immunoreactivity expression was stimulated by S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP), an NO donor, and intracellular cGMP concentration. The cultured cells expressed immunoreactive nNOS, and 7-NI inhibited basal COX-2 immunoreactivity expression, which could be partially overcome by cGMP. In summary, these studies indicate that NO is a mediator of increased renal cortical COX-2 expression seen in volume depletion and suggest important interactions between the NO and COX-2 systems in the regulation of arteriolar tone and the renin-angiotensin system by the macula densa.
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24 MeSH Terms
Interactions of the renin-angiotensin system and neuronal nitric oxide synthase in regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 in the macula densa.
Harris RC, Cheng H, Wang J, Zhang M, McKanna JA
(2000) Acta Physiol Scand 168: 47-51
MeSH Terms: Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors, Animals, Captopril, Citrulline, Cyclooxygenase 2, Diet, Sodium-Restricted, Enzyme Inhibitors, Indazoles, Isoenzymes, Kidney, Nitric Oxide Synthase, Nitric Oxide Synthase Type I, Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases, RNA, Messenger, Rats, Renin-Angiotensin System, Thiourea
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in rat kidney is localized to the macula densa and the immediately proximal cTALH and increases after salt restriction. Either ACE inhibitors or AT1 receptor blockers increase COX-2 expression in both control and salt-restricted animals, suggesting that the RAS activation feedback inhibits renal cortical COX-2 expression. To determine whether increased COX-2 expression in response to ACE inhibition mediated increases in renin production, rats were treated with Captopril for 1 week with or without the specific COX-2 inhibitor, SC58236. Plasma renin activity increased significantly in the Captopril group. This increase was partially reversed by simultaneous treatment with SC58236. Kidney renin activity also increased in the Captopril group compared with control, which was also significantly inhibited by SC58236 treatment. Because of the localization of bNOS to MD and surrounding cTALH, the current study investigated the role of NO in the regulation of COX-2 expression. Rats were fed a normal diet, low salt diet or low salt diet combined with captopril and half of them were treated with the neuronal NOS inhibitor, 7-NI, and half with vehicle. After 7 days, mRNA was extracted and the microsome proteins purified from renal cortex. COX-2 mRNA expression was measured by Northern-blot and normalized with GAPDH. 7-NI treatment decreased COX-2 mRNA and immunoreactive COX-2 expression in each group. In summary, these studies indicate that COX-2 from macula densa/cTALH is a regulator of renin production and release. Angiotensin II may be a negative regulator of cTALH/macula densa COX-2 expression, and NO may mediate increased renal cortical COX-2 expression seen in volume depletion. These studies suggest important interactions between the NO and COX-2 systems in the regulation of arteriolar tone and the renin-angiotensin system by the macula densa.
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17 MeSH Terms