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Intestinal bile acids directly modulate the structure and function of TcdB toxin.
Tam J, Icho S, Utama E, Orrell KE, Gómez-Biagi RF, Theriot CM, Kroh HK, Rutherford SA, Lacy DB, Melnyk RA
(2020) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 117: 6792-6800
MeSH Terms: Bacterial Toxins, Bile Acids and Salts, Caco-2 Cells, Clostridioides difficile, Clostridium Infections, HCT116 Cells, Humans, Intestines, Receptors, Cell Surface
Show Abstract · Added March 24, 2020
Intestinal bile acids are known to modulate the germination and growth of Here we describe a role for intestinal bile acids in directly binding and neutralizing TcdB toxin, the primary determinant of disease. We show that individual primary and secondary bile acids reversibly bind and inhibit TcdB to varying degrees through a mechanism that requires the combined oligopeptide repeats region to which no function has previously been ascribed. We find that bile acids induce TcdB into a compact "balled up" conformation that is no longer able to bind cell surface receptors. Lastly, through a high-throughput screen designed to identify bile acid mimetics we uncovered nonsteroidal small molecule scaffolds that bind and inhibit TcdB through a bile acid-like mechanism. In addition to suggesting a role for bile acids in pathogenesis, these findings provide a framework for development of a mechanistic class of antitoxins.
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9 MeSH Terms
miR-302a Inhibits Metastasis and Cetuximab Resistance in Colorectal Cancer by Targeting NFIB and CD44.
Sun L, Fang Y, Wang X, Han Y, Du F, Li C, Hu H, Liu H, Liu Q, Wang J, Liang J, Chen P, Yang H, Nie Y, Wu K, Fan D, Coffey RJ, Lu Y, Zhao X, Wang X
(2019) Theranostics 9: 8409-8425
MeSH Terms: Caco-2 Cells, Cetuximab, Colorectal Neoplasms, Drug Resistance, Neoplasm, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, HCT116 Cells, Humans, Hyaluronan Receptors, In Vitro Techniques, MicroRNAs, NFI Transcription Factors, Neoplasm Metastasis, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
: Metastasis and drug resistance contribute substantially to the poor prognosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. However, the epigenetic regulatory mechanisms by which CRC develops metastatic and drug-resistant characteristics remain unclear. This study aimed to investigate the role of miR-302a in the metastasis and molecular-targeted drug resistance of CRC and elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms. : miR-302a expression in CRC cell lines and patient tissue microarrays was analyzed by qPCR and fluorescence hybridization. The roles of miR-302a in metastasis and cetuximab (CTX) resistance were evaluated both and . Bioinformatic prediction algorithms and luciferase reporter assays were performed to identify the miR-302a binding regions in the NFIB and CD44 3'-UTRs. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay was performed to examine NFIB occupancy in the ITGA6 promoter region. Immunoblotting was performed to identify the EGFR-mediated pathways altered by miR-302a. : miR-302a expression was frequently reduced in CRC cells and tissues, especially in CTX-resistant cells and patient-derived xenografts. The decreased miR-302a levels correlated with poor overall CRC patient survival. miR-302a overexpression inhibited metastasis and restored CTX responsiveness in CRC cells, whereas miR-302a silencing exerted the opposite effects. NFIB and CD44 were identified as novel targets of miR-302a. miR-302a inhibited the metastasis-promoting effect of NFIB that physiologically activates ITGA6 transcription. miR-302a restored CTX responsiveness by suppressing CD44-induced cancer stem cell-like properties and EGFR-mediated MAPK and AKT signaling. These results are consistent with clinical observations indicating that miR-302a expression is inversely correlated with the expression of its targets in CRC specimens. : Our findings show that miR-302a acts as a multifaceted regulator of CRC metastasis and CTX resistance by targeting NFIB and CD44, respectively. Our study implicates miR-302a as a candidate prognostic predictor and a therapeutic agent in CRC.
© The author(s).
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13 MeSH Terms
Structural insights into the transition of Clostridioides difficile binary toxin from prepore to pore.
Anderson DM, Sheedlo MJ, Jensen JL, Lacy DB
(2020) Nat Microbiol 5: 102-107
MeSH Terms: ADP Ribose Transferases, Bacterial Proteins, Bacterial Toxins, Caco-2 Cells, Cryoelectron Microscopy, Humans, Models, Molecular, Polysaccharides, Pore Forming Cytotoxic Proteins, Protein Binding, Protein Domains, Protein Multimerization, Receptors, LDL
Show Abstract · Added March 24, 2020
Clostridioides (formerly Clostridium) difficile is a Gram-positive, spore-forming anaerobe and a leading cause of hospital-acquired infection and gastroenteritis-associated death in US hospitals. The disease state is usually preceded by disruption of the host microbiome in response to antibiotic treatment and is characterized by mild to severe diarrhoea. C. difficile infection is dependent on the secretion of one or more AB-type toxins: toxin A (TcdA), toxin B (TcdB) and the C. difficile transferase toxin (CDT). Whereas TcdA and TcdB are considered the primary virulence factors, recent studies suggest that CDT increases the severity of C. difficile infection in some of the most problematic clinical strains. To better understand how CDT functions, we used cryo-electron microscopy to define the structure of CDTb, the cell-binding component of CDT. We obtained structures of several oligomeric forms that highlight the conformational changes that enable conversion from a prepore to a β-barrel pore. The structural analysis also reveals a glycan-binding domain and residues involved in binding the host-cell receptor, lipolysis-stimulated lipoprotein receptor. Together, these results provide a framework to understand how CDT functions at the host cell interface.
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13 MeSH Terms
Protein kinase A-mediated phosphorylation of naked cuticle homolog 2 stimulates cell-surface delivery of transforming growth factor-α for epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation.
Cao Z, Singh B, Li C, Markham NO, Carrington LJ, Franklin JL, Graves-Deal R, Kennedy EJ, Goldenring JR, Coffey RJ
(2019) Traffic 20: 357-368
MeSH Terms: A Kinase Anchor Proteins, Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing, Animals, Caco-2 Cells, Calcium-Binding Proteins, Cell Cycle Proteins, Cell Membrane, Cyclic AMP-Dependent Protein Kinases, Dinoprostone, Dogs, ErbB Receptors, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Madin Darby Canine Kidney Cells, Protein Transport, Signal Transduction, Transforming Growth Factor alpha, Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
The classic mode of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-mediated transactivation of the receptor tyrosine kinase epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) transactivation occurs via matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-mediated cleavage of plasma membrane-anchored EGFR ligands. Herein, we show that the Gαs-activating GPCR ligands vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and prostaglandin E (PGE ) transactivate EGFR through increased cell-surface delivery of the EGFR ligand transforming growth factor-α (TGFα) in polarizing madin-darby canine kidney (MDCK) and Caco-2 cells. This is achieved by PKA-mediated phosphorylation of naked cuticle homolog 2 (NKD2), previously shown to bind TGFα and direct delivery of TGFα-containing vesicles to the basolateral surface of polarized epithelial cells. VIP and PGE rapidly activate protein kinase A (PKA) that then phosphorylates NKD2 at Ser-223, a process that is facilitated by the molecular scaffold A-kinase anchoring protein 12 (AKAP12). This phosphorylation stabilized NKD2, ensuring efficient cell-surface delivery of TGFα and increased EGFR activation. Thus, GPCR-triggered, PKA/AKAP12/NKD2-regulated targeting of TGFα to the cell surface represents a new mode of EGFR transactivation that occurs proximal to ligand cleavage by MMPs.
© 2019 The Authors. Traffic published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
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18 MeSH Terms
BVES is required for maintenance of colonic epithelial integrity in experimental colitis by modifying intestinal permeability.
Choksi YA, Reddy VK, Singh K, Barrett CW, Short SP, Parang B, Keating CE, Thompson JJ, Verriere TG, Brown RE, Piazuelo MB, Bader DM, Washington MK, Mittal MK, Brand T, Gobert AP, Coburn LA, Wilson KT, Williams CS
(2018) Mucosal Immunol 11: 1363-1374
MeSH Terms: Adult, Animals, Caco-2 Cells, Cell Adhesion Molecules, Cell Line, Cell Line, Tumor, Citrobacter rodentium, Coculture Techniques, Colitis, Ulcerative, Colon, Dextran Sulfate, Epithelial Cells, Escherichia coli, Female, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Intestinal Absorption, Intestinal Mucosa, Male, Membrane Proteins, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Middle Aged, Muscle Proteins, Permeability, RNA, Messenger, Signal Transduction, Tight Junctions
Show Abstract · Added June 23, 2018
Blood vessel epicardial substance (BVES), or POPDC1, is a tight junction-associated transmembrane protein that modulates epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) via junctional signaling pathways. There have been no in vivo studies investigating the role of BVES in colitis. We hypothesized that BVES is critical for maintaining colonic epithelial integrity. At baseline, Bves mouse colons demonstrate increased crypt height, elevated proliferation, decreased apoptosis, altered intestinal lineage allocation, and dysregulation of tight junctions with functional deficits in permeability and altered intestinal immunity. Bves mice inoculated with Citrobacter rodentium had greater colonic injury, increased colonic and mesenteric lymph node bacterial colonization, and altered immune responses after infection. We propose that increased bacterial colonization and translocation result in amplified immune responses and worsened injury. Similarly, dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) treatment resulted in greater histologic injury in Bves mice. Two different human cell lines (Caco2 and HEK293Ts) co-cultured with enteropathogenic E. coli showed increased attaching/effacing lesions in the absence of BVES. Finally, BVES mRNA levels were reduced in human ulcerative colitis (UC) biopsy specimens. Collectively, these studies suggest that BVES plays a protective role both in ulcerative and infectious colitis and identify BVES as a critical protector of colonic mucosal integrity.
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28 MeSH Terms
Mechanistic insight into the interaction of gastrointestinal mucus with oral diblock copolymers synthesized via ATRP method.
Liu J, Cao J, Cao J, Han S, Liang Y, Bai M, Sun Y
(2018) Int J Nanomedicine 13: 2839-2856
MeSH Terms: Administration, Oral, Animals, Caco-2 Cells, Drug Carriers, Humans, Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Interactions, Indoles, Intestinal Absorption, Intestinal Mucosa, Male, Methacrylates, Methylmethacrylates, Mice, Nanoparticles, Nylons, Particle Size, Polymers, Propionates, Tissue Distribution
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
Introduction - Nanoparticles are increasingly used as drug carriers for oral administration. The delivery of drug molecules is largely dependent on the interaction of nanocarriers and gastrointestinal (GI) mucus, a critical barrier that regulates drug absorption. It is therefore important to understand the effects of physical and chemical properties of nanocarriers on the interaction with GI mucus. Unfortunately, most of the nanoparticles are unable to be prepared with satisfactory structural monodispersity to comprehensively investigate the interaction. With controlled size, shape, and surface chemistry, copolymers are ideal candidates for such purpose.
Materials and methods - We synthesized a series of diblock copolymers via the atom transfer radical polymerization method and investigated the GI mucus permeability in vitro and in vivo.
Results - Our results indicated that uncharged and hydrophobic copolymers exhibited enhanced GI absorption.
Conclusion - These results provide insights into developing optimal nanocarriers for oral administration.
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A neutralizing antibody that blocks delivery of the enzymatic cargo of toxin TcdB into host cells.
Kroh HK, Chandrasekaran R, Zhang Z, Rosenthal K, Woods R, Jin X, Nyborg AC, Rainey GJ, Warrener P, Melnyk RA, Spiller BW, Lacy DB
(2018) J Biol Chem 293: 941-952
MeSH Terms: Antibodies, Monoclonal, Antibodies, Neutralizing, Bacterial Toxins, Caco-2 Cells, Clostridioides difficile, Crystallography, X-Ray, Cytosol, Enterotoxins, Humans, Hydrogen-Ion Concentration, Microscopy, Electron, Rubidium, rac1 GTP-Binding Protein
Show Abstract · Added March 15, 2018
infection is the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhea and is mediated by the actions of two toxins, TcdA and TcdB. The toxins perturb host cell function through a multistep process of receptor binding, endocytosis, low pH-induced pore formation, and the translocation and delivery of an N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain that inactivates host GTPases. Infection studies with isogenic strains having defined toxin deletions have established TcdB as an important target for therapeutic development. Monoclonal antibodies that neutralize TcdB function have been shown to protect against infection in animal models and reduce recurrence in humans. Here, we report the mechanism of TcdB neutralization by PA41, a humanized monoclonal antibody capable of neutralizing TcdB from a diverse array of strains. Through a combination of structural, biochemical, and cell functional studies, involving X-ray crystallography and EM, we show that PA41 recognizes a single, highly conserved epitope on the TcdB glucosyltransferase domain and blocks productive translocation and delivery of the enzymatic cargo into the host cell. Our study reveals a unique mechanism of toxin neutralization by a monoclonal antibody, which involves targeting a process that is conserved across the large clostridial glucosylating toxins. The PA41 antibody described here provides a valuable tool for dissecting the mechanism of toxin pore formation and translocation across the endosomal membrane.
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13 MeSH Terms
Shear stress induces noncanonical autophagy in intestinal epithelial monolayers.
Kim SW, Ehrman J, Ahn MR, Kondo J, Lopez AAM, Oh YS, Kim XH, Crawley SW, Goldenring JR, Tyska MJ, Rericha EC, Lau KS
(2017) Mol Biol Cell 28: 3043-3056
MeSH Terms: Actins, Autophagy, Caco-2 Cells, Cell Culture Techniques, Epithelium, Humans, Intestinal Mucosa, Intestines, Microvilli, Stress, Physiological, Vacuoles
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2018
Flow of fluids through the gut, such as milk from a neonatal diet, generates a shear stress on the unilaminar epithelium lining the lumen. We report that exposure to physiological levels of fluid shear stress leads to the formation of large vacuoles, containing extracellular contents within polarizing intestinal epithelial cell monolayers. These observations lead to two questions: how can cells lacking primary cilia transduce shear stress, and what molecular pathways support the formation of vacuoles that can exceed 80% of the cell volume? We find that shear forces are sensed by actin-rich microvilli that eventually generate the apical brush border, providing evidence that these structures possess mechanosensing ability. Importantly, we identified the molecular pathway that regulates large vacuole formation downstream from mechanostimulation to involve central components of the autophagy pathway, including ATG5 and LC3, but not Beclin. Together our results establish a novel link between the actin-rich microvilli, the macroscopic transport of fluids across cells, and the noncanonical autophagy pathway in organized epithelial monolayers.
© 2017 Kim et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).
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MeSH Terms
Functional defects in TcdB toxin uptake identify CSPG4 receptor-binding determinants.
Gupta P, Zhang Z, Sugiman-Marangos SN, Tam J, Raman S, Julien JP, Kroh HK, Lacy DB, Murgolo N, Bekkari K, Therien AG, Hernandez LD, Melnyk RA
(2017) J Biol Chem 292: 17290-17301
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antibodies, Monoclonal, Antibodies, Neutralizing, Bacterial Proteins, Bacterial Toxins, Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies, CHO Cells, Caco-2 Cells, Chlorocebus aethiops, Chondroitin Sulfate Proteoglycans, Clostridioides difficile, Cricetinae, Cricetulus, Glucosyltransferases, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Membrane Proteins, Protein Binding, Protein Domains
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2018
is a major nosocomial pathogen that produces two exotoxins, TcdA and TcdB, with TcdB thought to be the primary determinant in human disease. TcdA and TcdB are large, multidomain proteins, each harboring a cytotoxic glucosyltransferase domain that is delivered into the cytosol from endosomes via a translocation domain after receptor-mediated endocytosis of toxins from the cell surface. Although there are currently no known host cell receptors for TcdA, three cell-surface receptors for TcdB have been identified: CSPG4, NECTIN3, and FZD1/2/7. The sites on TcdB that mediate binding to each receptor are not defined. Furthermore, it is not known whether the combined repetitive oligopeptide (CROP) domain is involved in or required for receptor binding. Here, in a screen designed to identify sites in TcdB that are essential for target cell intoxication, we identified a region at the junction of the translocation and the CROP domains that is implicated in CSPG4 binding. Using a series of C-terminal truncations, we show that the CSPG4-binding site on TcdB extends into the CROP domain, requiring three short repeats for binding and for full toxicity on CSPG4-expressing cells. Consistent with the location of the CSPG4-binding site on TcdB, we show that the anti-TcdB antibody bezlotoxumab, which binds partially within the first three short repeats, prevents CSPG4 binding to TcdB. In addition to establishing the binding region for CSPG4, this work ascribes for the first time a role in TcdB CROPs in receptor binding and further clarifies the relative roles of host receptors in TcdB pathogenesis.
© 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.
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19 MeSH Terms
Microbiota-activated PPAR-γ signaling inhibits dysbiotic Enterobacteriaceae expansion.
Byndloss MX, Olsan EE, Rivera-Chávez F, Tiffany CR, Cevallos SA, Lokken KL, Torres TP, Byndloss AJ, Faber F, Gao Y, Litvak Y, Lopez CA, Xu G, Napoli E, Giulivi C, Tsolis RM, Revzin A, Lebrilla CB, Bäumler AJ
(2017) Science 357: 570-575
MeSH Terms: Angiopoietin-like 4 Protein, Anilides, Animals, Anti-Bacterial Agents, Butyrates, Caco-2 Cells, Clostridium, Colitis, Colon, Dysbiosis, Enterobacteriaceae, Epithelial Cells, Female, Gastrointestinal Microbiome, Gene Expression, Homeostasis, Humans, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Nitrates, Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II, Oxidation-Reduction, PPAR gamma, Signal Transduction, Streptomycin
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2020
Perturbation of the gut-associated microbial community may underlie many human illnesses, but the mechanisms that maintain homeostasis are poorly understood. We found that the depletion of butyrate-producing microbes by antibiotic treatment reduced epithelial signaling through the intracellular butyrate sensor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPAR-γ). Nitrate levels increased in the colonic lumen because epithelial expression of , the gene encoding inducible nitric oxide synthase, was elevated in the absence of PPAR-γ signaling. Microbiota-induced PPAR-γ signaling also limits the luminal bioavailability of oxygen by driving the energy metabolism of colonic epithelial cells (colonocytes) toward β-oxidation. Therefore, microbiota-activated PPAR-γ signaling is a homeostatic pathway that prevents a dysbiotic expansion of potentially pathogenic and by reducing the bioavailability of respiratory electron acceptors to Enterobacteriaceae in the lumen of the colon.
Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.
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