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Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs Alter the Microbiota and Exacerbate Colitis while Dysregulating the Inflammatory Response.
Maseda D, Zackular JP, Trindade B, Kirk L, Roxas JL, Rogers LM, Washington MK, Du L, Koyama T, Viswanathan VK, Vedantam G, Schloss PD, Crofford LJ, Skaar EP, Aronoff DM
(2019) MBio 10:
MeSH Terms: Animals, Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal, CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes, Clostridium Infections, Gastrointestinal Microbiome, Indomethacin, Intestinal Mucosa, Mice, Neutrophils, Prostaglandins, Survival Analysis
Show Abstract · Added April 7, 2019
infection (CDI) is a major public health threat worldwide. The use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is associated with enhanced susceptibility to and severity of CDI; however, the mechanisms driving this phenomenon have not been elucidated. NSAIDs alter prostaglandin (PG) metabolism by inhibiting cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes. Here, we found that treatment with the NSAID indomethacin prior to infection altered the microbiota and dramatically increased mortality and the intestinal pathology associated with CDI in mice. We demonstrated that in -infected animals, indomethacin treatment led to PG deregulation, an altered proinflammatory transcriptional and protein profile, and perturbed epithelial cell junctions. These effects were paralleled by increased recruitment of intestinal neutrophils and CD4 cells and also by a perturbation of the gut microbiota. Together, these data implicate NSAIDs in the disruption of protective COX-mediated PG production during CDI, resulting in altered epithelial integrity and associated immune responses. infection (CDI) is a spore-forming anaerobic bacterium and leading cause of antibiotic-associated colitis. Epidemiological data suggest that use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) increases the risk for CDI in humans, a potentially important observation given the widespread use of NSAIDs. Prior studies in rodent models of CDI found that NSAID exposure following infection increases the severity of CDI, but mechanisms to explain this are lacking. Here we present new data from a mouse model of antibiotic-associated CDI suggesting that brief NSAID exposure prior to CDI increases the severity of the infectious colitis. These data shed new light on potential mechanisms linking NSAID use to worsened CDI, including drug-induced disturbances to the gut microbiome and colonic epithelial integrity. Studies were limited to a single NSAID (indomethacin), so future studies are needed to assess the generalizability of our findings and to establish a direct link to the human condition.
Copyright © 2019 Maseda et al.
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11 MeSH Terms
CD4:CD8 Ratio and CD8 Count as Prognostic Markers for Mortality in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients on Antiretroviral Therapy: The Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC).
Trickey A, May MT, Schommers P, Tate J, Ingle SM, Guest JL, Gill MJ, Zangerle R, Saag M, Reiss P, Monforte AD, Johnson M, Lima VD, Sterling TR, Cavassini M, Wittkop L, Costagliola D, Sterne JAC, Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC)
(2017) Clin Infect Dis 65: 959-966
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Anti-HIV Agents, Biomarkers, CD4-CD8 Ratio, CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes, CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes, Cause of Death, Europe, Female, HIV Infections, Humans, Lymphocyte Count, Male, Middle Aged, North America, Prognosis, Proportional Hazards Models, Viral Load, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Background - We investigated whether CD4:CD8 ratio and CD8 count were prognostic for all-cause, AIDS, and non-AIDS mortality in virologically suppressed patients with high CD4 count.
Methods - We used data from 13 European and North American cohorts of human immunodeficiency virus-infected, antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive adults who started ART during 1996-2010, who were followed from the date they had CD4 count ≥350 cells/μL and were virologically suppressed (baseline). We used stratified Cox models to estimate unadjusted and adjusted (for sex, people who inject drugs, ART initiation year, and baseline age, CD4 count, AIDS, duration of ART) all-cause and cause-specific mortality hazard ratios for tertiles of CD4:CD8 ratio (0-0.40, 0.41-0.64 [reference], >0.64) and CD8 count (0-760, 761-1138 [reference], >1138 cells/μL) and examined the shape of associations using cubic splines.
Results - During 276526 person-years, 1834 of 49865 patients died (249 AIDS-related; 1076 non-AIDS-defining; 509 unknown/unclassifiable deaths). There was little evidence that CD4:CD8 ratio was prognostic for all-cause mortality after adjustment for other factors: the adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) for lower vs middle tertile was 1.11 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.00-1.25). The association of CD8 count with all-cause mortality was U-shaped: aHR for higher vs middle tertile was 1.13 (95% CI, 1.01-1.26). AIDS-related mortality declined with increasing CD4:CD8 ratio and decreasing CD8 count. There was little evidence that CD4:CD8 ratio or CD8 count was prognostic for non-AIDS mortality.
Conclusions - In this large cohort collaboration, the magnitude of adjusted associations of CD4:CD8 ratio or CD8 count with mortality was too small for them to be useful as independent prognostic markers in virally suppressed patients on ART.
© The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.
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21 MeSH Terms
Host Expression of the CD8 Treg/NK Cell Restriction Element Qa-1 is Dispensable for Transplant Tolerance.
Stocks BT, Wilson CS, Marshall AF, Brewer LA, Moore DJ
(2017) Sci Rep 7: 11181
MeSH Terms: Animals, B-Lymphocytes, CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes, Histocompatibility Antigens Class I, Immune Tolerance, Killer Cells, Natural, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory, Transplantation
Show Abstract · Added September 13, 2017
Disruption of the non-classical Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Ib molecule Qa-1 impairs CD8 Treg and natural killer (NK) cell function and promotes a lupus-like autoimmune disease. This immune perturbation would be expected to enhance anti-transplant responses and impair tolerance induction, but the effect of Qa-1 deficiency on the transplant response has not been previously reported. Qa-1 deficiency enhanced CD4 TFH and germinal center (GC) B cell numbers in naïve mice and hastened islet allograft rejection. Despite enhanced immunity in B6.Qa-1 mice, these mice did not generate an excessive primary CD4 TFH cell response nor an enhanced alloantibody reaction. Both CD8 Tregs and NK cells, which often regulate other cells through host Qa-1 expression, were targets of anti-CD45RB therapy that had not been previously recognized. However, B6.Qa-1 mice remained susceptible to anti-CD45RB mediated suppression of the alloantibody response and transplant tolerance induction to mismatched islet allografts. Overall, despite enhanced immunity as demonstrated by augmented CD4 TFH/GC B cell numbers and hastened islet allograft rejection in naïve 12-week old Qa-1 deficient mice, the CD8 Treg/NK cell restriction element Qa-1 does not regulate the primary cellular or humoral alloresponse and is not required for long-term transplant tolerance.
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10 MeSH Terms
Broadly neutralizing antibodies targeting the HIV-1 envelope V2 apex confer protection against a clade C SHIV challenge.
Julg B, Tartaglia LJ, Keele BF, Wagh K, Pegu A, Sok D, Abbink P, Schmidt SD, Wang K, Chen X, Joyce MG, Georgiev IS, Choe M, Kwong PD, Doria-Rose NA, Le K, Louder MK, Bailer RT, Moore PL, Korber B, Seaman MS, Abdool Karim SS, Morris L, Koup RA, Mascola JR, Burton DR, Barouch DH
(2017) Sci Transl Med 9:
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Animals, Antibodies, Neutralizing, CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes, Female, HIV Envelope Protein gp120, HIV-1, Macaca mulatta, Male, Neutralization Tests, Sequence Alignment, Simian Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome, Simian Immunodeficiency Virus, Viral Load
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Neutralizing antibodies to the V2 apex antigenic region of the HIV-1 envelope (Env) trimer are among the most prevalent cross-reactive antibodies elicited by natural infection. Two recently described V2-specific antibodies, PGDM1400 and CAP256-VRC26.25, have demonstrated exquisite potency and neutralization breadth against HIV-1. However, little data exist on the protective efficacy of V2-specific neutralizing antibodies. We created a novel SHIV-325c viral stock that included a clade C HIV-1 envelope and was susceptible to neutralization by both of these antibodies. Rhesus macaques received a single infusion of either antibody at three different concentrations (2, 0.4, and 0.08 mg/kg) before challenge with SHIV-325c. PGDM1400 was fully protective at the 0.4 mg/kg dose, whereas CAP256-VRC26.25-LS was fully protective even at the 0.08 mg/kg dose, which correlated with its greater in vitro neutralization potency against the challenge virus. Serum antibody concentrations required for protection were <0.75 μg/ml for CAP256-VRC26.25-LS. These data demonstrate unprecedented potency and protective efficacy of V2-specific neutralizing antibodies in nonhuman primates and validate V2 as a potential target for the prevention of HIV-1 infection in passive immunization strategies in humans.
Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.
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14 MeSH Terms
Dominant protection from HLA-linked autoimmunity by antigen-specific regulatory T cells.
Ooi JD, Petersen J, Tan YH, Huynh M, Willett ZJ, Ramarathinam SH, Eggenhuizen PJ, Loh KL, Watson KA, Gan PY, Alikhan MA, Dudek NL, Handel A, Hudson BG, Fugger L, Power DA, Holt SG, Coates PT, Gregersen JW, Purcell AW, Holdsworth SR, La Gruta NL, Reid HH, Rossjohn J, Kitching AR
(2017) Nature 545: 243-247
MeSH Terms: Animals, Anti-Glomerular Basement Membrane Disease, Autoimmunity, Base Sequence, CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes, Collagen Type IV, Cytokines, Female, Forkhead Transcription Factors, HLA-DR Serological Subtypes, HLA-DR1 Antigen, Humans, Immunodominant Epitopes, Male, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, Models, Molecular, T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory
Show Abstract · Added June 2, 2017
Susceptibility and protection against human autoimmune diseases, including type I diabetes, multiple sclerosis, and Goodpasture disease, is associated with particular human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles. However, the mechanisms underpinning such HLA-mediated effects on self-tolerance remain unclear. Here we investigate the molecular mechanism of Goodpasture disease, an HLA-linked autoimmune renal disorder characterized by an immunodominant CD4 T-cell self-epitope derived from the α3 chain of type IV collagen (α3). While HLA-DR15 confers a markedly increased disease risk, the protective HLA-DR1 allele is dominantly protective in trans with HLA-DR15 (ref. 2). We show that autoreactive α3-specific T cells expand in patients with Goodpasture disease and, in α3-immunized HLA-DR15 transgenic mice, α3-specific T cells infiltrate the kidney and mice develop Goodpasture disease. HLA-DR15 and HLA-DR1 exhibit distinct peptide repertoires and binding preferences and present the α3 epitope in different binding registers. HLA-DR15-α3 tetramer T cells in HLA-DR15 transgenic mice exhibit a conventional T-cell phenotype (T) that secretes pro-inflammatory cytokines. In contrast, HLA-DR1-α3 tetramer T cells in HLA-DR1 and HLA-DR15/DR1 transgenic mice are predominantly CD4Foxp3 regulatory T cells (T cells) expressing tolerogenic cytokines. HLA-DR1-induced T cells confer resistance to disease in HLA-DR15/DR1 transgenic mice. HLA-DR15 and HLA-DR1 healthy human donors display altered α3-specific T-cell antigen receptor usage, HLA-DR15-α3 tetramer Foxp3 T and HLA-DR1-α3 tetramer Foxp3CD25CD127 T dominant phenotypes. Moreover, patients with Goodpasture disease display a clonally expanded α3-specific CD4 T-cell repertoire. Accordingly, we provide a mechanistic basis for the dominantly protective effect of HLA in autoimmune disease, whereby HLA polymorphism shapes the relative abundance of self-epitope specific T cells that leads to protection or causation of autoimmunity.
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18 MeSH Terms
Association of CD4+ T-cell Count, HIV-1 RNA Viral Load, and Antiretroviral Therapy With Kaposi Sarcoma Risk Among HIV-infected Persons in the United States and Canada.
Dubrow R, Qin L, Lin H, Hernández-Ramírez RU, Neugebauer RS, Leyden W, Althoff KN, Achenbach CJ, Hessol NA, Modur SP, DʼSouza G, Bosch RJ, Grover S, Horberg MA, Kitahata MM, Mayor AM, Novak RM, Rabkin CS, Sterling TR, Goedert JJ, Justice AC, Engels EA, Moore RD, Silverberg MJ, North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design of the International Epidemiologic Databases to Evaluate AIDS
(2017) J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr 75: 382-390
MeSH Terms: Adult, Anti-HIV Agents, CD4 Lymphocyte Count, CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes, Canada, Cohort Studies, Female, HIV Infections, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Proportional Hazards Models, RNA, Viral, Sarcoma, Kaposi, United States, Viral Load
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
BACKGROUND - Kaposi sarcoma (KS) remains common among HIV-infected persons. To better understand KS etiology and to help target prevention efforts, we comprehensively examined a variety of CD4 T-cell count and HIV-1 RNA viral load (VL) measures, as well as antiretroviral therapy (ART) use, to determine independent predictors of KS risk.
SETTING - North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design.
METHODS - We followed HIV-infected persons during 1996-2009 from 18 cohorts. We used time-updated Cox regression to model relationships between KS risk and recent, lagged, trajectory, and cumulative CD4 count or VL measures, as well as ART use. We used Akaike's information criterion and global P values to derive a final model.
RESULTS - In separate models, the relationship between each measure and KS risk was highly significant (P < 0.0001). Our final mutually adjusted model included recent CD4 count [hazard ratio (HR) for <50 vs. ≥500 cells/μL = 12.4; 95% confidence interval (CI): 6.5 to 23.8], recent VL (HR for ≥100,000 vs. ≤500 copies/mL = 3.8; 95% CI: 2.0 to 7.3), and cumulative (time-weighted mean) VL (HR for ≥100,000 vs. ≤500 copies/mL = 2.5; 95% CI: 1.0 to 5.9). Each P-trend was <0.0001. After adjusting for these measures, we did not detect an independent association between ART use and KS risk.
CONCLUSIONS - Our results suggested a multifactorial etiology for KS, with early and late phases of development. The cumulative VL effect suggested that controlling HIV replication promptly after HIV diagnosis is important for KS prevention. We observed no evidence for direct anti-KS activity of ART, independent of CD4 count and VL.
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16 MeSH Terms
The Yin/Yan of CCL2: a minor role in neutrophil anti-tumor activity in vitro but a major role on the outgrowth of metastatic breast cancer lesions in the lung in vivo.
Lavender N, Yang J, Chen SC, Sai J, Johnson CA, Owens P, Ayers GD, Richmond A
(2017) BMC Cancer 17: 88
MeSH Terms: Animals, Breast Neoplasms, CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes, CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes, Cell Line, Tumor, Chemokine CCL2, Coculture Techniques, Disease Models, Animal, Disease Progression, Disease-Free Survival, Female, Humans, Leukocytes, Lung, Lung Neoplasms, Macrophages, Mice, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Neutrophils
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2017
BACKGROUND - The role of the chemokine CCL2 in breast cancer is controversial. While CCL2 recruits and activates pro-tumor macrophages, it is also reported to enhance neutrophil-mediated anti-tumor activity. Moreover, loss of CCL2 in early development enhances breast cancer progression.
METHODS - To clarify these conflicting findings, we examined the ability of CCL2 to alter naïve and tumor entrained neutrophil production of ROS, release of granzyme-B, and killing of tumor cells in multiple mouse models of breast cancer. CCL2 was delivered intranasally in mice to elevate CCL2 levels in the lung and effects on seeding and growth of breast tumor cells were evaluated. The TCGA data base was queried for relationship between CCL2 expression and relapse free survival of breast cancer patients and compared to subsets of breast cancer patients.
RESULTS - Even though each of the tumor cell lines studied produced approximately equal amounts of CCL2, exogenous delivery of CCL2 to co-cultures of breast tumor cells and neutrophils enhanced the ability of tumor-entrained neutrophils (TEN) to kill the less aggressive 67NR variant of 4T1 breast cancer cells. However, exogenous CCL2 did not enhance naïve or TEN neutrophil killing of more aggressive 4T1 or PyMT breast tumor cells. Moreover, this anti-tumor activity was not observed in vivo. Intranasal delivery of CCL2 to BALB/c mice markedly enhanced seeding and outgrowth of 67NR cells in the lung and increased the recruitment of CD4+ T cells and CD8+ central memory T cells into lungs of tumor bearing mice. There was no significant increase in the recruitment of CD19+ B cells, or F4/80+, Ly6G+ and CD11c + myeloid cells. CCL2 had an equal effect on CD206+ and MHCII+ populations of macrophages, thus balancing the pro- and anti-tumor macrophage cell population. Analysis of the relationship between CCL2 levels and relapse free survival in humans revealed that overall survival is not significantly different between high CCL2 expressing and low CCL2 expressing breast cancer patients grouped together. However, examination of the relationship between high CCL2 expressing basal-like, HER2+ and luminal B breast cancer patients revealed that higher CCL2 expressing tumors in these subgroups have a significantly higher probability of surviving longer than those expressing low CCL2.
CONCLUSIONS - While our in vitro data support a potential anti-tumor role for CCL2 in TEN neutrophil- mediated tumor killing in poorly aggressive tumors, intranasal delivery of CCL2 increased CD4+ T cell recruitment to the pre-metastatic niche of the lung and this correlated with enhanced seeding and growth of tumor cells. These data indicate that effects of CCL2/CCR2 antagonists on the intratumoral leukocyte content should be monitored in ongoing clinical trials using these agents.
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20 MeSH Terms
Identification of a CD4-Binding-Site Antibody to HIV that Evolved Near-Pan Neutralization Breadth.
Huang J, Kang BH, Ishida E, Zhou T, Griesman T, Sheng Z, Wu F, Doria-Rose NA, Zhang B, McKee K, O'Dell S, Chuang GY, Druz A, Georgiev IS, Schramm CA, Zheng A, Joyce MG, Asokan M, Ransier A, Darko S, Migueles SA, Bailer RT, Louder MK, Alam SM, Parks R, Kelsoe G, Von Holle T, Haynes BF, Douek DC, Hirsch V, Seaman MS, Shapiro L, Mascola JR, Kwong PD, Connors M
(2016) Immunity 45: 1108-1121
MeSH Terms: Antibodies, Neutralizing, Antibody Specificity, Binding Sites, Antibody, CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes, Cell Separation, HIV Antibodies, HIV Envelope Protein gp120, HIV Infections, HIV-1, Humans
Show Abstract · Added May 3, 2017
Detailed studies of the broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) that underlie the best available examples of the humoral immune response to HIV are providing important information for the development of therapies and prophylaxis for HIV-1 infection. Here, we report a CD4-binding site (CD4bs) antibody, named N6, that potently neutralized 98% of HIV-1 isolates, including 16 of 20 that were resistant to other members of its class. N6 evolved a mode of recognition such that its binding was not impacted by the loss of individual contacts across the immunoglobulin heavy chain. In addition, structural analysis revealed that the orientation of N6 permitted it to avoid steric clashes with glycans, which is a common mechanism of resistance. Thus, an HIV-1-specific bNAb can achieve potent, near-pan neutralization of HIV-1, making it an attractive candidate for use in therapy and prophylaxis.
Published by Elsevier Inc.
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10 MeSH Terms
Analysis of self-antigen specificity of islet-infiltrating T cells from human donors with type 1 diabetes.
Babon JA, DeNicola ME, Blodgett DM, Crèvecoeur I, Buttrick TS, Maehr R, Bottino R, Naji A, Kaddis J, Elyaman W, James EA, Haliyur R, Brissova M, Overbergh L, Mathieu C, Delong T, Haskins K, Pugliese A, Campbell-Thompson M, Mathews C, Atkinson MA, Powers AC, Harlan DM, Kent SC
(2016) Nat Med 22: 1482-1487
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Autoantigens, Autoimmunity, CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes, CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes, Child, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1, Female, HLA-A2 Antigen, HLA-DQ Antigens, Humans, Islets of Langerhans, Male, T-Lymphocytes, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added April 26, 2017
A major therapeutic goal for type 1 diabetes (T1D) is to induce autoantigen-specific tolerance of T cells. This could suppress autoimmunity in those at risk for the development of T1D, as well as in those with established disease who receive islet replacement or regeneration therapy. Because functional studies of human autoreactive T cell responses have been limited largely to peripheral blood-derived T cells, it is unclear how representative the peripheral T cell repertoire is of T cells infiltrating the islets. Our knowledge of the insulitic T cell repertoire is derived from histological and immunohistochemical analyses of insulitis, the identification of autoreactive CD8 T cells in situ, in islets of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A2 donors and isolation and identification of DQ8 and DQ2-DQ8 heterodimer-restricted, proinsulin-reactive CD4 T cells grown from islets of a single donor with T1D. Here we present an analysis of 50 of a total of 236 CD4 and CD8 T cell lines grown from individual handpicked islets or clones directly sorted from handpicked, dispersed islets from nine donors with T1D. Seventeen of these T cell lines and clones reacted to a broad range of studied native islet antigens and to post-translationally modified peptides. These studies demonstrate the existence of a variety of islet-infiltrating, islet-autoantigen reactive T cells in individuals with T1D, and these data have implications for the design of successful immunotherapies.
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16 MeSH Terms
Prostaglandin I2 Suppresses Proinflammatory Chemokine Expression, CD4 T Cell Activation, and STAT6-Independent Allergic Lung Inflammation.
Zhou W, Zhang J, Goleniewska K, Dulek DE, Toki S, Newcomb DC, Cephus JY, Collins RD, Wu P, Boothby MR, Peebles RS
(2016) J Immunol 197: 1577-86
MeSH Terms: Allergens, Animals, Antihypertensive Agents, Asthma, CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes, Cell Proliferation, Chemokines, Epoprostenol, Hypersensitivity, Indomethacin, Inflammation, Interleukin-13, Interleukin-5, Lung, Lymphocyte Activation, Mice, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Mice, Knockout, Ovalbumin, Receptors, Epoprostenol, STAT6 Transcription Factor, Signal Transduction, Th2 Cells
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Allergic airway diseases are immune disorders associated with heightened type 2 immune responses and IL-5 and IL-13 production at the site of inflammation. We have previously reported that cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition by indomethacin augmented allergic airway inflammation in a STAT6-independent manner. However, the key COX product(s) responsible for restraining indomethacin-mediated STAT6-independent allergic inflammation is unknown. In this study, using the mouse model of OVA-induced allergic airway inflammation, we identified that PGI2 receptor (IP) signaling was critical for indomethacin-induced, STAT6-independent proallergic effects. We demonstrated that IP deficiency increased inflammatory cell infiltration, eosinophilia, and IL-5 and IL-13 expression in the lung in a STAT6-independent manner. The augmented STAT6-independent allergic inflammation correlated with enhanced primary immune responses to allergic sensitization and elevated production of multiple inflammatory chemokines (CCL11, CCL17, CCL22, and CXCL12) in the lung after allergen challenge. We also showed that the PGI2 analogue cicaprost inhibited CD4 T cell proliferation and IL-5 and IL-13 expression in vitro, and IP deficiency diminished the stimulatory effect of indomethacin on STAT6-independent IL-5 and IL-13 responses in vivo. The inhibitory effects of PGI2 and the IP signaling pathway on CD4 T cell activation, inflammatory chemokine production, and allergic sensitization and airway inflammation suggest that PGI2 and its analogue iloprost, both Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs, may be useful in treating allergic diseases and asthma. In addition, inhibiting PGI2 signaling by drugs that either block PGI2 production or restrain IP signaling may augment STAT6-independent pathways of allergic inflammation.
Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.
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23 MeSH Terms