Other search tools

About this data

The publication data currently available has been vetted by Vanderbilt faculty, staff, administrators and trainees. The data itself is retrieved directly from NCBI's PubMed and is automatically updated on a weekly basis to ensure accuracy and completeness.

If you have any questions or comments, please contact us.

Results: 1 to 10 of 123

Publication Record

Connections

Exercise is Associated With Increased Small HDL Particle Concentration and Decreased Vascular Stiffness in Rheumatoid Arthritis.
Byram KW, Oeser AM, Linton MF, Fazio S, Stein CM, Ormseth MJ
(2018) J Clin Rheumatol 24: 417-421
MeSH Terms: Aged, Arthritis, Rheumatoid, Blood Pressure, C-Reactive Protein, Cardiovascular Diseases, Cholesterol, HDL, Cross-Sectional Studies, Exercise, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Incidence, Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Male, Middle Aged, Reference Values, Risk Assessment, Self Report, Severity of Illness Index, Vascular Stiffness
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2019
OBJECTIVE - Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have increased cardiovascular (CV) risk. In the general population, exercise improves several CV risk factors. In a cross-sectional study, we examined the hypothesis that more exercise is associated with protective traditional and non-traditional CV risk factor profile in patients with RA.
METHODS - Patient-reported exercise outside of daily activities was quantified by time and metabolic equivalents per week (METmin/week) and CV risk factors including blood pressure, standard lipid profiles, lipoprotein particle concentrations (NMR spectroscopy), and vascular indices were measured in 165 patients with RA. The relationship between exercise and CV risk factors was assessed according to whether patients exercised or not, and after adjustment for age, race and sex.
RESULTS - Over half (54%) of RA patients did not exercise. Among those who did exercise, median value for exercise duration was 113 min/week [IQR: 60, 210], and exercise metabolic equivalent expenditure was 484 METmin/week [IQR: 258, 990]. Disease activity (measured by DAS28 score), C-reactive protein, waist-hip ratio, and prevalence of hypertension were lower in patients who exercised compared to those who did not (all p-values < 0.05) but standard lipid profile and body mass index were not significantly different. Patients who exercised had significantly higher concentrations of HDL particles (p = 0.004) and lower vascular stiffness as measured by pulse wave velocity (p = 0.005).
CONCLUSIONS - More self-reported exercise in patients with RA was associated with a protective CV risk factor profile including lower waist-hip ratio, higher HDL particle concentration, lower vascular stiffness, and a lower prevalence of hypertension.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
20 MeSH Terms
Systemic inflammation is associated with exaggerated skeletal muscle protein catabolism in maintenance hemodialysis patients.
Deger SM, Hung AM, Gamboa JL, Siew ED, Ellis CD, Booker C, Sha F, Li H, Bian A, Stewart TG, Zent R, Mitch WE, Abumrad NN, Ikizler TA
(2017) JCI Insight 2:
MeSH Terms: Adult, Animals, Biomarkers, C-Reactive Protein, Cytokines, Disease Models, Animal, Female, Homeostasis, Humans, Inflammation, Integrin beta1, Kinetics, Male, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Middle Aged, Multivariate Analysis, Muscle Proteins, Muscle, Skeletal, Regression Analysis, Renal Dialysis, Renal Insufficiency, Chronic, SKP Cullin F-Box Protein Ligases, Tripartite Motif Proteins, Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
BACKGROUND - Systemic inflammation and muscle wasting are highly prevalent and coexist in patients on maintenance hemodialysis (MHD). We aimed to determine the effects of systemic inflammation on skeletal muscle protein metabolism in MHD patients.
METHODS - Whole body and skeletal muscle protein turnover were assessed by stable isotope kinetic studies. We incorporated expressions of E1, E214K, E3αI, E3αII, MuRF-1, and atrogin-1 in skeletal muscle tissue from integrin β1 gene KO CKD mice models.
RESULTS - Among 129 patients with mean (± SD) age 47 ± 12 years, 74% were African American, 73% were male, and 22% had diabetes mellitus. Median high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) concentration was 13 (interquartile range 0.8, 33) mg/l. There were statistically significant associations between hs-CRP and forearm skeletal muscle protein synthesis, degradation, and net forearm skeletal muscle protein balance (P < 0.001 for all). The associations remained statistically significant after adjustment for clinical and demographic confounders, as well as in sensitivity analysis, excluding patients with diabetes mellitus. In attempting to identify potential mechanisms involved in this correlation, we show increased expressions of E1, E214K, E3αI, E3αII, MuRF-1, and atrogin-1 in skeletal muscle tissue obtained from an animal model of chronic kidney disease.
CONCLUSION - These data suggest that systemic inflammation is a strong and independent determinant of skeletal muscle protein homeostasis in MHD patients, providing rationale for further studies using anticytokine therapies in patients with underlying systemic inflammation.
FUNDING - This study was in part supported by NIH grants R01 DK45604 and 1K24 DK62849, the Clinical Translational Science Award UL1-TR000445 from the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, the Veterans Administration Merit Award I01 CX000414, the SatelliteHealth Normon Coplon Extramural Grant Program, and the FDA grant 000943.
0 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
25 MeSH Terms
Associations between self-reported diabetes and 78 circulating markers of inflammation, immunity, and metabolism among adults in the United States.
Van Dyke AL, Lang Kuhs KA, Shiels MS, Koshiol J, Trabert B, Loftfield E, Purdue MP, Wentzensen N, Pfeiffer RM, Katki HA, Hildesheim A, Kemp TJ, Pinto LA, Chaturvedi AK, Safaeian M
(2017) PLoS One 12: e0182359
MeSH Terms: Aged, Biomarkers, C-Reactive Protein, Chemokines, Cross-Sectional Studies, Diabetes Mellitus, Energy Metabolism, Female, Humans, Inflammation, Interleukin-6, Logistic Models, Male, Middle Aged, Receptors, Interleukin-6, Self Report, United States
Show Abstract · Added August 15, 2017
Inflammation is increasingly thought to be associated with diabetes; however, only a few inflammation markers have been assessed concurrently in relation to history of diabetes. In the most comprehensive evaluation of inflammation markers and diabetes to date using a Luminex bead-based assay, we measured 78 inflammation-, immune-, and metabolic-related markers detectable in at least 10% of serum samples collected from participants from the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer (PLCO) screening trial (n = 1,814). At baseline, 6.6% (n = 120) of PLCO participants self-reported a history of diabetes. Cross-sectional associations between these markers and self-reported diabetes were assessed using weighted logistic regression adjusting for sex, smoking status, blood draw age and year, body mass index, and cohort sub-study. Including chemokines [C-C motif ligand (CCL) 19, CCL20, CCL21, C-X-C motif ligand (CXCL) 6, CXCL10, and CXCL11] and soluble cytokine and chemokine receptors [soluble (s) interleukin (IL) 6 receptor (R), soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor (sTNFR) 1, sTNFR2, and sIL-R2], ten inflammation-related markers, were nominally associated with diabetes (P<0.05). In addition to these associations, higher levels of insulin, gastric inhibitory polypeptide, and pancreatic polypeptide remained significantly associated with self-reported diabetes with a false discovery rate <5%, indicating that the assay was able to detect markers associated with diabetes. In summary, self-reported diabetes was nominally associated with circulating cytokines, chemokines, and soluble cytokine and chemokine receptors in the most expansive examination of diabetes and inflammation- and immune-related markers to date. These results highlight the need to explore in future prospective studies the role of inflammation markers in diabetes.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
17 MeSH Terms
Echocardiographic Pulmonary Artery Systolic Pressure in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study: Associations With Race and Metabolic Dysregulation.
Brittain EL, Nwabuo C, Xu M, Gupta DK, Hemnes AR, Moreira HT, De Vasconcellos HD, Terry JG, Carr JJ, Lima JA
(2017) J Am Heart Assoc 6:
MeSH Terms: African Americans, Age Factors, Blood Pressure, C-Reactive Protein, Cohort Studies, Coronary Artery Disease, Echocardiography, Echocardiography, Doppler, Ethnic Groups, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Humans, Hypertension, Hypertension, Pulmonary, Insulin Resistance, Interleukin-6, Intra-Abdominal Fat, Male, Metabolic Syndrome, Middle Aged, Overweight, Pulmonary Artery, Systole, Tissue Survival, Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Show Abstract · Added September 11, 2017
BACKGROUND - The determinants of pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) are not fully understood. It is unknown whether racial differences in PASP exist or if other population characteristics are associated with pulmonary pressure in humans. We examined echocardiographically estimated PASP in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study, a middle-aged, biracial community-based cohort.
METHODS AND RESULTS - At the CARDIA year-25 examination, 3469 participants underwent echocardiography, including measurement of tricuspid regurgitant jet velocity to estimate PASP. Clinical features, laboratory values, pulmonary function tests, and measurement of adipose depot volume were analyzed for association with PASP. PASP was estimated in 1311 individuals (61% female, 51% white). Older age, higher blood pressure, and higher body mass index were associated with higher PASP. Black race was associated with higher PASP after adjustment for demographics and left and right ventricular function (β 0.94, 95% CI 0.24-1.64; =0.009), but this association was no longer significant after further adjustment for lung volume (β 0.42, 95% CI -0.68 to 0.96; =0.74). Insulin resistance, inflammation (C-reactive protein and interleukin-6), and visceral adipose volume were independently associated with higher PASP after adjustment for relevant covariates. PASP rose with worsening diastolic function (ratio of early transmitral Doppler velocity to average mitral annular tissue Doppler velocity [E/e'] and left atrial volume index).
CONCLUSIONS - In a large biracial cohort of middle-aged adults, we identified associations among black race, insulin resistance, and diastolic dysfunction with higher echocardiographically estimated PASP. Further studies are needed to examine racial differences in PASP and whether insulin resistance directly contributes to pulmonary vascular disease in humans.
© 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.
0 Communities
3 Members
0 Resources
25 MeSH Terms
Left Ventricular Function Across the Spectrum of Body Mass Index in African Americans: The Jackson Heart Study.
Patel VG, Gupta DK, Terry JG, Kabagambe EK, Wang TJ, Correa A, Griswold M, Taylor H, Carr JJ
(2017) JACC Heart Fail 5: 182-190
MeSH Terms: African Americans, Aged, Body Mass Index, C-Reactive Protein, Cohort Studies, E-Selectin, Female, Humans, Inflammation, Insulin Resistance, Intra-Abdominal Fat, Linear Models, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Cine, Male, Middle Aged, Multidetector Computed Tomography, Multivariate Analysis, Obesity, Overweight, P-Selectin, Stroke Volume, Ventricular Dysfunction, Left, Ventricular Function, Left
Show Abstract · Added March 4, 2017
OBJECTIVES - This study sought to assess whether body mass index (BMI) was associated with subclinical left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction in African-American individuals.
BACKGROUND - Higher BMI is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, including heart failure. Obesity disproportionately affects African Americans; however, the association between higher BMI and LV function in African Americans is not well understood.
METHODS - Peak systolic circumferential strain (ECC) was measured by tagged cardiac magnetic resonance in 1,652 adult African-American participants of the Jackson Heart Study between 2008 and 2012. We evaluated the association between BMI and ECC in multivariate linear regression and restricted cubic spline analyses adjusted for prevalent cardiovascular disease, conventional cardiovascular risk factors, LV mass, and ejection fraction. In exploratory analyses, we also examined whether inflammation, insulin resistance, or volume of visceral adipose tissue altered the association between BMI and ECC.
RESULTS - The proportions of female, nonsmokers, diabetic, and hypertensive participants rose with increase in BMI. In multivariate-adjusted models, higher BMI was associated with worse ECC (β = 0.052; 95% confidence interval: 0.028 to 0.075), even in the setting of preserved LV ejection fraction. Higher BMI was also associated with worse ECC when accounting for markers of inflammation (C-reactive protein, E-selection, and P-selectin), insulin resistance, and volume of visceral adipose tissue.
CONCLUSIONS - Higher BMI is significantly associated with subclinical LV dysfunction in African Americans, even in the setting of preserved LV ejection fraction.
Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
3 Members
0 Resources
24 MeSH Terms
Physical activity and metabolic health in chronic kidney disease: a cross-sectional study.
Bowlby W, Zelnick LR, Henry C, Himmelfarb J, Kahn SE, Kestenbaum B, Robinson-Cohen C, Utzschneider KM, de Boer IH
(2016) BMC Nephrol 17: 187
MeSH Terms: Absorptiometry, Photon, Accelerometry, Adipose Tissue, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Blood Pressure, C-Reactive Protein, Case-Control Studies, Cholesterol, HDL, Cross-Sectional Studies, Exercise, Female, Glomerular Filtration Rate, Homeostasis, Humans, Insulin Resistance, Male, Middle Aged, Renal Insufficiency, Chronic, Triglycerides
Show Abstract · Added September 19, 2017
BACKGROUND - Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at high risk of progression to end stage renal disease and cardiovascular events. Physical activity may reduce these risks by improving metabolic health. We tested associations of physical activity with central components of metabolic health among people with moderate-severe non-diabetic CKD.
METHODS - We performed a cross-sectional study of 47 people with CKD (estimated GFR <60 ml/min/1.73 m) and 29 healthy control subjects. Accelerometry was used to measured physical activity over 7 days, the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp was used to measure insulin sensitivity, and DXA was used to measured fat mass. We tested associations of physical activity with insulin sensitivity, fat mass, blood pressure, serum lipid concentrations, and serum high sensitivity C-reactive protein concentration using multivariable linear regression, adjusting for possible confounding factors.
RESULTS - Participants with CKD were less active than participants without CKD (mean (SD) 468.1 (233.1) versus 662.3 (292.5) counts per minute) and had lower insulin sensitivity (4.1 (2.1) versus 5.2 (2.0 (mg/min)/(μU/mL)), higher fat mass (32.0 (11.4) versus 29.4 (14.8) kg), and higher triglyceride concentrations (153.2 (91.6) versus 99.6 (66.8) mg/dL). With adjustment for demographics, comorbidity, medications, and estimated GFR, each two-fold higher level of physical activity was associated with a 0.9 (mg/min)/(μU/mL) higher insulin sensitivity (95% CI 0.2, 1.5, p = 0.006), an 8.0 kg lower fat mass (-12.9, -3.1, p = 0.001), and a 37.9 mg/dL lower triglyceride concentration (-71.9, -3.9, p = 0.03). Associations of physical activity with insulin sensitivity and triglycerides did not differ significantly by CKD status (p-values for interaction >0.3).
CONCLUSIONS - Greater physical activity is associated with multiple manifestations of metabolic health among people with moderate-severe CKD.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
20 MeSH Terms
High Dose Omega-3 Fatty Acid Administration and Skeletal Muscle Protein Turnover in Maintenance Hemodialysis Patients.
Deger SM, Hung AM, Ellis CD, Booker C, Bian A, Chen G, Abumrad NN, Ikizler TA
(2016) Clin J Am Soc Nephrol 11: 1227-35
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Amino Acids, Blood Glucose, C-Reactive Protein, Dietary Supplements, Double-Blind Method, Fatty Acids, Omega-3, Female, Forearm, Humans, Inflammation, Insulin Resistance, Male, Middle Aged, Muscle Proteins, Muscle, Skeletal, Protein Biosynthesis, Renal Dialysis, Renal Insufficiency, Chronic
Show Abstract · Added July 1, 2016
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES - Protein energy wasting and systemic inflammation are prevalent in maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) patients. Omega-3 (ω-3) fatty acids have anti-inflammatory properties and have been shown to improve protein homeostasis. We hypothesized that administration of high-dose (2.9 g/d) ω-3 would be associated with decreased muscle protein breakdown in MHD patients with systemic inflammation.
DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS & MEASUREMENTS - This is a substudy from a randomized, placebo-controlled study (NCT00655525). Patients were recruited between September 2008 and June 2011. Primary inclusion criteria included signs of chronic inflammation (average C-reactive protein of ≥5 mg/L over three consecutive measurements), lack of active infectious or inflammatory disease, no hospitalization within 1 month prior to the study, and not receiving steroids (>5 mg/d) and/or immunosuppressive agents. The primary outcomes were forearm muscle and whole body protein breakdown and synthesis before and after the intervention. The patients received ω-3 (n=11) versus placebo (n=9) for 12 weeks. Analysis of covariance was used to compare outcome variables at 12 weeks. Models were adjusted for a propensity score that was derived from age, sex, race, baseline high sensitivity C-reactive protein, diabetes mellitus, and fat mass because the groups were not balanced for several characteristics.
RESULTS - Compared with placebo, ω-3 supplementation was significantly associated with decreased muscle protein breakdown at 12 weeks (-31, [interquartile range, -98--13] versus 26 [interquartile range, 13-87] µg/100 ml per min; P=0.01), which remained significant after multivariate adjustment (-46, [95% confidence interval, -102 to -1] µg/100 ml per min). ω-3 Supplementation resulted in decreased forearm muscle protein synthesis while the rate in the placebo group increased; however, there is no longer a statistically significant difference in skeletal muscle protein synthesis or in net protein balance after multivariate adjustment. There was no statistically significant effect of ω-3 supplementation on whole body protein synthesis or breakdown.
CONCLUSIONS - High-dose ω-3 supplementation over 12 weeks in MHD patients with systemic inflammation was associated with attenuation of forearm muscle protein breakdown but did not influence skeletal muscle protein synthesis, skeletal muscle net protein balance or any component of the whole-body protein balance. These results should be interpreted cautiously given the imbalance in the two groups and the short duration of the intervention.
Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.
0 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
20 MeSH Terms
Utility of Nontraditional Risk Markers in Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment.
Yeboah J, Young R, McClelland RL, Delaney JC, Polonsky TS, Dawood FZ, Blaha MJ, Miedema MD, Sibley CT, Carr JJ, Burke GL, Goff DC, Psaty BM, Greenland P, Herrington DM
(2016) J Am Coll Cardiol 67: 139-147
MeSH Terms: Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Ankle Brachial Index, Biomarkers, C-Reactive Protein, Cholesterol, Coronary Artery Disease, Coronary Vessels, Disease Progression, Ethnic Groups, Family Health, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Health Status Indicators, Humans, Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors, Male, Middle Aged, Predictive Value of Tests, Proportional Hazards Models, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, United States, Vascular Calcification
Show Abstract · Added September 29, 2016
BACKGROUND - The improvement in discrimination gained by adding nontraditional cardiovascular risk markers cited in the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association cholesterol guidelines to the atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk estimator (pooled cohort equation [PCE]) is untested.
OBJECTIVES - This study assessed the predictive accuracy and improvement in reclassification gained by the addition of the coronary artery calcium (CAC) score, the ankle-brachial index (ABI), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) levels, and family history (FH) of ASCVD to the PCE in participants of MESA (Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis).
METHODS - The PCE was calibrated (cPCE) and used for this analysis. The Cox proportional hazards survival model, Harrell's C statistics, and net reclassification improvement analyses were used. ASCVD was defined as myocardial infarction, coronary heart disease-related death, or fatal or nonfatal stroke.
RESULTS - Of 6,814 MESA participants not prescribed statins at baseline, 5,185 had complete data and were included in this analysis. Their mean age was 61 years; 53.1% were women, 9.8% had diabetes, and 13.6% were current smokers. After 10 years of follow-up, 320 (6.2%) ASCVD events occurred. CAC score, ABI, and FH were independent predictors of ASCVD events in the multivariable Cox models. CAC score modestly improved the Harrell's C statistic (0.74 vs. 0.76; p = 0.04); ABI, hsCRP levels, and FH produced no improvement in Harrell's C statistic when added to the cPCE.
CONCLUSIONS - CAC score, ABI, and FH were independent predictors of ASCVD events. CAC score modestly improved the discriminative ability of the cPCE compared with other nontraditional risk markers.
Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
24 MeSH Terms
Evaluation of pro-inflammatory markers plasma C-reactive protein and urinary prostaglandin-E2 metabolite in colorectal adenoma risk.
Davenport JR, Cai Q, Ness RM, Milne G, Zhao Z, Smalley WE, Zheng W, Shrubsole MJ
(2016) Mol Carcinog 55: 1251-61
MeSH Terms: Adenoma, Aged, Biomarkers, Tumor, C-Reactive Protein, Case-Control Studies, Colonoscopy, Colorectal Neoplasms, Dinoprostone, Early Detection of Cancer, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors
Show Abstract · Added September 28, 2015
C-reactive protein (CRP) is a pro-inflammatory protein with potential as a biomarker in predicting colon cancer risk. However, little is known regarding its association with risk of colorectal adenomas, particularly by subtypes. We conducted a colonoscopy-based matched case-control study to assess whether elevated plasma CRP levels may be associated with colorectal adenoma risk and further whether this association may be modified by urinary prostaglandin E2 metabolite (PGE-M), a biomarker of systemic prostaglandin E2 production. Included in the study were 226 cases with a single small tubular adenoma, 198 cases with multiple small tubular adenomas, 283 cases with at least one advanced adenoma, and 395 polyp-free controls. No apparent association between CRP level and risk of single small tubular adenomas was found (ptrend  = 0.59). A dose-response relationship with CRP level was observed for risk of either multiple small tubular adenomas (OR = 2.01, 95%CI = 1.10-3.68 for the highest versus lowest tertile comparison; ptrend   = 0.03) or advanced adenomas (OR = 1.81, 95%CI = 1.10-2.96 for the highest versus lowest tertile comparison; ptrend  = 0.02). In a joint analysis of CRP level and PGE-M, risk of multiple or advanced adenoma was greatest among those with highest levels of both CRP and PGE-M in comparison to those with low CRP and low PGE-M (OR = 3.72, 95%CI = 1.49-9.72). Our results suggest that elevated CRP, particularly in the context of concurrent elevated PGE-M, may be a biomarker of multiple or advanced adenoma risk in a screening age population. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
© 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
1 Communities
3 Members
0 Resources
15 MeSH Terms
Uric acid correlates to oxidation and inflammation in opposite directions in women.
Wu SH, Shu XO, Milne G, Xiang YB, Zhang X, Cai Q, Fazio S, Linton MF, Chen H, Purdue M, Rothman N, Gao YT, Zheng W, Yang G
(2015) Biomarkers 20: 225-31
MeSH Terms: Aged, Biomarkers, C-Reactive Protein, Case-Control Studies, Chromatography, Liquid, F2-Isoprostanes, Female, Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry, Humans, Inflammation, Inflammation Mediators, Interleukin-6, Middle Aged, Oxidation-Reduction, Tandem Mass Spectrometry, Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha, Uric Acid
Show Abstract · Added March 10, 2016
OBJECTIVE - To evaluate the association of uric acid (UA) levels with a panel of markers of oxidative stress and inflammation.
METHODS - Plasma UA levels, along with a panel of oxidative stress and inflammatory markers, were measured in 755 Chinese women.
RESULTS - Plasma UA levels were inversely associated with urinary levels of the oxidative stress marker F2-isoprostanes and positively correlated to levels of inflammatory markers, such as C-reactive protein and some proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6) in blood as well as prostaglandin E2 metabolites in urine.
CONCLUSIONS - Plasma UA levels correlate to oxidation and inflammation biomarkers in opposite directions in women.
1 Communities
3 Members
0 Resources
17 MeSH Terms