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Fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 ligand increases resistance to burn wound infection through effects on plasmacytoid dendritic cells.
Bae L, Bohannon JK, Cui W, Vinish M, Toliver-Kinsky T
(2017) BMC Immunol 18: 9
MeSH Terms: Animals, Burns, Cell Differentiation, Cell Movement, Cells, Cultured, Coculture Techniques, Dendritic Cells, Disease Models, Animal, Humans, Male, Membrane Proteins, Mice, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Neutrophil Activation, Neutrophils, Pseudomonas Infections, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Sepsis
Show Abstract · Added May 10, 2017
BACKGROUND - Patients experiencing large thermal injuries are susceptible to opportunistic infections that can delay recovery and lead to sepsis. Dendritic cells (DC) are important for the detection of pathogens and activation of the innate and acquired immune responses. DCs are significantly decreased in burn patients early after injury, and the development of sepsis is associated with persistent DC depletion. In a murine model of burn wound infection, the enhancement of DCs after injury by treatment with the DC growth factor Fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 ligand (FL) enhances neutrophil migration to infection, improves bacterial clearance, and increases survival in a DC-dependent manner. FL expands the production of both conventional DCs (cDC) and plasmacytoid DCs (pDC). It has been established that cDCs are required for some of the protective effects of FL after burn injury. This study was designed to determine the contribution of the pDC subset.
METHODS - Mice were subjected to full-thickness scald burns under deep anesthesia and were provided analgesia. pDCs were depleted by injection of anti-plasmacytoid dendritic cell antigen-1 antibodies. Survival, bacterial clearance, and neutrophil responses in vivo and in vitro were measured.
RESULTS - Depletion of preexisting pDCs, but not FL-expanded pDCs, abrogated the beneficial effects of FL on survival, bacterial clearance, and neutrophil migration in response to burn wound infection. This requisite role of pDCs for FL-mediated enhancement of neutrophil migratory capacity is not due to direct effects of pDCs on neutrophils. cDCs, but not pDCs, directly increased neutrophil migratory capacity after co-culture.
CONCLUSIONS - The protective effects of FL treatment after burn injury are mediated by both pDCs and cDCs. Pharmacological enhancement of both DC subtypes by FL is a potential therapeutic intervention to enhance immune responses to infection and improve outcome after burn injury.
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18 MeSH Terms
Flt3 Ligand Treatment Attenuates T Cell Dysfunction and Improves Survival in a Murine Model of Burn Wound Sepsis.
Patil NK, Bohannon JK, Luan L, Guo Y, Fensterheim B, Hernandez A, Wang J, Sherwood ER
(2017) Shock 47: 40-51
MeSH Terms: Animals, Burns, CD28 Antigens, CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes, CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes, Disease Models, Animal, Interferon-gamma, Male, Membrane Proteins, Mice, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Sepsis, T-Lymphocytes
Show Abstract · Added December 13, 2016
INTRODUCTION - Sepsis is a leading cause of death among severely burned patients. Burn injury disrupts the protective skin barrier and causes immunological dysfunction. In our previous studies, we found that burn injury and wound infection causes a significant decline in lymphocyte populations, implying adaptive immune system dysfunction. In the present study, we examined the effect of treatment with Fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 Ligand (Flt3L) on T cell phenotype and function in a model of burn wound sepsis. FLt3L is an essential cytokine required for hematopoietic progenitor cell development and expansion of both myeloid and lymphoid lineages. Flt3L has been shown to potentiate innate immune functions of dendritic cells and neutrophils during burn wound sepsis. However, the ability of Flt3L to improve T cell function during burn wound sepsis has not been previously evaluated.
METHODS - Mice underwent 35% total body surface area scald burn and were treated with Flt3L (10 μg) or vehicle daily via the intraperitoneal route starting 1 day after burn injury. On day 4 after burn injury, Pseudomonas aeruginosa was used to induce wound infection. Leukocytes in spleen and wound draining lymph nodes were characterized using flow cytometry. Bacterial clearance, organ injury, and survival were also assessed.
RESULTS - Flt3L treatment prevented the decline in splenic CD4 and CD8 T cells caused by burn injury and infection. Flt3L treatment also attenuated the decline in CD28 expression on CD4 and CD8 T cells and IFNγ production by CD8 T cells in the spleen and wound draining lymph nodes. Furthermore, Flt3L decreased the levels of programmed death ligand 1 expression on splenic dendritic cells and macrophages. Flt3 treatment improved systemic bacterial clearance, decreased liver and kidney injury, and significantly improved survival in mice with burn wound sepsis.
CONCLUSION - Burn injury and associated sepsis causes significant loss of T cells and evidence of T cell dysfunction. Flt3L attenuates T cell dysfunction and improves host resistance to burn wound sepsis in mice.
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13 MeSH Terms
IL-15 Superagonist Expands mCD8+ T, NK and NKT Cells after Burn Injury but Fails to Improve Outcome during Burn Wound Infection.
Patil NK, Luan L, Bohannon JK, Guo Y, Hernandez A, Fensterheim B, Sherwood ER
(2016) PLoS One 11: e0148452
MeSH Terms: Adaptive Immunity, Animals, Burns, CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes, Cytokines, Disease Models, Animal, Humans, Interleukin-15, Killer Cells, Natural, Liver, Lymphocyte Activation, Lymphocyte Count, Lymphocyte Subsets, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Natural Killer T-Cells, Pseudomonas Infections, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Receptors, Interleukin-15, Recombinant Fusion Proteins, Spleen, Wound Infection
Show Abstract · Added February 18, 2016
BACKGROUND - Severely burned patients are highly susceptible to opportunistic infections and sepsis, owing to the loss of the protective skin barrier and immunological dysfunction. Interleukin-15 (IL-15) belongs to the IL-2 family of common gamma chain cytokines and stimulates the proliferation and activation of T (specifically memory CD8), NK and NKT cells. It has been shown to preserve T cell function and improve survival during cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis in mice. However, the therapeutic efficacy of IL-15 or IL-15 superagonist (SA) during infection after burn injury has not been evaluated. Moreover, very few, if any, studies have examined, in detail, the effect of burn injury and infection on the adaptive immune system. Thus, we examined the effect of burn and sepsis on adaptive immune cell populations and the effect of IL-15 SA treatment on the host response to infection.
METHODS - Mice were subjected to a 35% total body surface area burn, followed by wound infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In some experiments, IL-15 SA was administered after burn injury, but before infection. Leukocytes in spleen, liver and peritoneal cavity were characterized using flow cytometry. Bacterial clearance, organ injury and survival were also assessed.
RESULTS - Burn wound infection led to a significant decline in total white blood cell and lymphocyte counts and induced organ injury and sepsis. Burn injury caused decline in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the spleen, which was worsened by infection. IL-15 treatment inhibited this decline and significantly increased cell numbers and activation, as determined by CD69 expression, of CD4+, CD8+, B, NK and NKT cells in the spleen and liver after burn injury. However, IL-15 SA treatment failed to prevent burn wound sepsis-induced loss of CD4+, CD8+, B, NK and NKT cells and failed to improve bacterial clearance and survival.
CONCLUSION - Cutaneous burn injury and infection cause significant adaptive immune dysfunction. IL-15 SA does not augment host resistance to burn wound sepsis in mice despite inducing proliferation and activation of lymphocyte subsets.
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23 MeSH Terms
Role of G-CSF in monophosphoryl lipid A-mediated augmentation of neutrophil functions after burn injury.
Bohannon JK, Luan L, Hernandez A, Afzal A, Guo Y, Patil NK, Fensterheim B, Sherwood ER
(2016) J Leukoc Biol 99: 629-40
MeSH Terms: Animals, Burns, Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor, Lipid A, Mice, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Neutrophil Infiltration, Neutrophils, Pseudomonas Infections, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Receptors, CXCR4
Show Abstract · Added February 18, 2016
Infection is the leading cause of death in severely burned patients that survive the acute phase of injury. Neutrophils are the first line of defense against infections, but hospitalized burn patients frequently cannot mount an appropriate innate response to infection. Thus, immune therapeutic approaches aimed at improving neutrophil functions after burn injury may be beneficial. Prophylactic treatment with the TLR4 agonist monophosphoryl lipid A is known to augment resistance to infection by enhancing neutrophil recruitment and facilitating bacterial clearance. This study aimed to define mechanisms by which monophosphoryl lipid A treatment improves bacterial clearance and survival in a model of burn-wound sepsis. Burn-injured mice were treated with monophosphoryl lipid A or vehicle, and neutrophil mobilization was evaluated in the presence or absence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Monophosphoryl lipid A treatment induced significant mobilization of neutrophils from the bone marrow into the blood and sites of infection. Neutrophil mobilization was associated with decreased bone marrow neutrophil CXCR4 expression and increased plasma G-CSF concentrations. Neutralization of G-CSF before monophosphoryl lipid A administration blocked monophosphoryl lipid A-induced expansion of bone marrow myeloid progenitors and mobilization of neutrophils into the blood and their recruitment to the site of infection. G-CSF neutralization ablated the enhanced bacterial clearance and survival benefit endowed by monophosphoryl lipid A in burn-wound-infected mice. Our findings provide convincing evidence that monophosphoryl lipid A-induced G-CSF facilitates early expansion, mobilization, and recruitment of neutrophils to the site of infection after burn injury, allowing for a robust immune response to infection.
© Society for Leukocyte Biology.
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11 MeSH Terms
Examination of the Early Diagnostic Applicability of Active Dynamic Thermography for Burn Wound Depth Assessment and Concept Analysis.
Prindeze NJ, Fathi P, Mino MJ, Mauskar NA, Travis TE, Paul DW, Moffatt LT, Shupp JW
(2015) J Burn Care Res 36: 626-35
MeSH Terms: Animals, Biopsy, Needle, Burns, Disease Models, Animal, Early Diagnosis, Immunohistochemistry, Injury Severity Score, Laser-Doppler Flowmetry, Male, Random Allocation, Sensitivity and Specificity, Skin, Swine, Thermography, Wound Healing
Show Abstract · Added March 20, 2018
Despite advances in perfusion imaging, burn wound imaging technology continues to lag behind that of other fields. Quantification of blood flow is able to predict time for healing, but clear assessment of burn depth is still questionable. Active dynamic thermography (ADT) is a noncontact imaging modality capable of distinguishing tissue of different thermal conductivities. Utilizing the abnormal heat transfer properties of the burn zones, we examined whether ADT was useful in the determination of burn depth in a model of early burn wound evaluation. Duroc pigs (castrated male; n = 3) were anesthetized, and two burns were created with an aluminum billet at 3 and 12 seconds. These contact times resulted in superficial partial and deep partial thickness burn wounds, respectively. ADT and laser Doppler imaging (LDI) imaging were performed every 30 minutes postburn for a total of five imaging sessions ending 150 minutes postburn. For ADT, imaging excitation was performed for 42-120 seconds with dual quartz-infrared lamps, and subsequent infrared image capture was performed for 300 seconds. MATLAB-assisted image analysis was performed to determine burn zone region of interest thermal relaxation and characteristic patterns. LDI was performed with a moorLDI system, and biopsies were captured for histology following the 150-minute imaging session. Both ADT and LDI imaging modalities are able to detect different physical properties at 30, 60, 90 120, and 150 minutes postburn with statistical significance (P < 0.05). Resultant ADT cooling curves characterize greater differences with greater stimulation and a potentially more identifiable differential cooling characteristic. Histological analysis confirmed burn depth. This preliminary work confirms that ADT can measure burn depth and is deserving of further research either as a stand-alone imaging technology or in combination with a device to assess perfusion.
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15 MeSH Terms
A physiological role for connective tissue growth factor in early wound healing.
Alfaro MP, Deskins DL, Wallus M, DasGupta J, Davidson JM, Nanney LB, A Guney M, Gannon M, Young PP
(2013) Lab Invest 93: 81-95
MeSH Terms: Analysis of Variance, Animals, Burns, Cell Physiological Phenomena, Collagen, Connective Tissue Growth Factor, Culture Media, Conditioned, Humans, Immunohistochemistry, Membrane Proteins, Mesenchymal Stem Cells, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Proteomics, Skin, Up-Regulation, Wound Healing
Show Abstract · Added January 8, 2014
Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that overexpress secreted frizzled-related protein 2 (sFRP2) exhibit an enhanced reparative phenotype. The secretomes of sFRP2-overexpressing MSCs and vector control-MSCs were compared through liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Proteomic profiling revealed that connective tissue growth factor (CTGF; CCN2) was overrepresented in the conditioned media of sFRP2-overexpressing MSCs and MSC-derived CTGF could thus be an important paracrine effector. Subcutaneously implanted, MSC-loaded polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) sponges and stented excisional wounds were used as wound models to study the dynamics of CTGF expression. Granulation tissue generated within the sponges and full-thickness skin wounds showed transient upregulation of CTGF expression by MSCs and fibroblasts, implying a role for this molecule in early tissue repair. Although collagen and COL1A2 mRNA were not increased when recombinant CTGF was administered to sponges during the early phase (day 1-6) of tissue repair, prolonged administration (>15 days) of exogenous CTGF into PVA sponges resulted in fibroblast proliferation and increased deposition of collagen within the experimental granulation tissue. In support of its physiological role, CTGF immunoinhibition during early repair (days 0-7) reduced the quantity, organizational quality and vascularity of experimental granulation tissue in the sponge model. However, CTGF haploinsufficiency was not enough to reduce collagen deposition in excisional wounds. Similar to acute murine wound models, CTGF was transiently present in the early phase of human acute burn wound healing. Together, these results further support a physiological role for CTGF in wound repair and demonstrate that when CTGF expression is confined to early tissue repair, it serves a pro-reparative role. These data also further illustrate the potential of MSC-derived paracrine modulators to enhance tissue repair.
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17 MeSH Terms
The Toll-like receptor 4 agonist monophosphoryl lipid a augments innate host resistance to systemic bacterial infection.
Romero CD, Varma TK, Hobbs JB, Reyes A, Driver B, Sherwood ER
(2011) Infect Immun 79: 3576-87
MeSH Terms: Animals, Burns, Cytokines, Female, Immunity, Innate, Lipid A, Lymphocyte Count, Macrophages, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C3H, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Neutrophils, Pseudomonas Infections, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Signal Transduction, Toll-Like Receptor 4, Wound Infection
Show Abstract · Added October 18, 2015
Monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) is a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) agonist that is currently used as a vaccine adjuvant in humans. In this study, we evaluated the effect of MPLA treatment on the innate immune response to systemic bacterial infections in mice. Mice treated with MPLA after burn injury showed improved survival and less local and systemic dissemination of bacteria in a model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa burn wound infection. Prophylactic treatment with MPLA significantly enhanced bacterial clearance at the site of infection and reduced systemic dissemination of bacteria despite causing attenuation of proinflammatory cytokine production during acute intra-abdominal infection caused by cecal ligation and puncture. Administration of MPLA at 1 h after CLP also improved bacterial clearance but did not alter cytokine production. MPLA treatment increased the numbers of granulocytes, double-positive myeloid cells, and macrophages at sites of infection and increased the percentage and total numbers of myeloid cells mediating phagocytosis of bacteria. Depletion of Ly6G(+) neutrophils, but not macrophages, eliminated the ability of MPLA treatment to improve bacterial clearance. The immunomodulatory effects of MPLA were absent in TLR4-deficient mice. In conclusion, these studies show that MPLA treatment significantly augments the innate immune response to bacterial infection by enhancing bacterial clearance despite the attenuation of proinflammatory cytokine production. The enhanced bacterial clearance is mediated, in part, by increased numbers of myeloid cells with effective phagocytic functions at sites of infection and is TLR4 dependent.
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18 MeSH Terms
Dendritic cell modification of neutrophil responses to infection after burn injury.
Bohannon J, Cui W, Sherwood E, Toliver-Kinsky T
(2010) J Immunol 185: 2847-53
MeSH Terms: Adjuvants, Immunologic, Adoptive Transfer, Animals, Burns, Cell Communication, Dendritic Cells, Disease Models, Animal, Hot Temperature, Immunity, Innate, Male, Membrane Proteins, Mice, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Mice, Transgenic, Neutrophil Infiltration, Neutrophils, Pseudomonas Infections, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Wound Infection
Show Abstract · Added October 18, 2015
Burn patients are highly susceptible to infections due to increased exposure through wounds and impairments in a number of immune functions. Dendritic cells (DCs) are important in activation of numerous immune responses that are essential for the clearance of infections. We have found that prophylactic treatment of burn-injured mice with the DC growth factor FLT3 ligand (FL) significantly increases resistance to burn wound infections in a DC-dependent manner that is correlated closely with enhanced bacterial clearance. However, as DCs are not typically microbicidal, the mechanisms by which DC modulation enhances bacterial clearance are not known. Due to the rapid response of neutrophils to cutaneous wounds, and the reported interactions between DCs and neutrophils, we investigated the role of neutrophils in FL-mediated resistance to burn wound infection. This was examined both in vivo and in vitro through neutrophil depletion, supplementation of neutrophils, and assessment of neutrophil chemotaxis following FL treatment. To test the involvement of DCs, CD11c-diphtheria toxin receptor transgenic mice were used to deplete DCs during FL treatment. Studies revealed that neutrophils do play a critical role in FL-mediated resistance to a burn wound infection. Additionally, treatment with FL after a burn injury enhances neutrophil-mediated control of bacterial spread, neutrophil migratory capacity, and myeloperoxidase production in a DC-dependent manner. The results of this study provide new insight into immunological mechanisms that can offer protection against infection after burn injury.
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19 MeSH Terms
Fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 ligand alters antigen-specific responses to infections after severe burn injury.
Bohannon J, Fang G, Cui W, Sherwood E, Toliver-Kinsky T
(2009) Shock 32: 435-41
MeSH Terms: Adaptive Immunity, Animals, Burns, Dendritic Cells, Immunoglobulin A, Immunoglobulin G, Immunoglobulin M, Interferon-gamma, Interleukin-10, Interleukin-12, Male, Membrane Proteins, Mice, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Pseudomonas Infections, Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Show Abstract · Added October 18, 2015
Burn patients are susceptible to opportunistic infections partly because of decreased immune functions, especially TH1-driven antigen-specific responses, which are regulated by dendritic cells. The dendritic cell growth factor, fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 ligand (FL), has been shown to increase resistance to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, in a dendritic cell-dependent manner, in a mouse model of burn wound infection. The specific mechanisms of protection are not known. This study tested the hypothesis that FL can enhance production of P. aeruginosa-specific antibodies after burn wound infection. Mice that had been previously exposed to P. aeruginosa were infected after burn injury by wound inoculation or challenged by intraperitoneal injection of heat-killed P. aeruginosa. In response to wound infection, FL treatments enhanced bacterial clearance and induced a shift from immunoglobulin (Ig) M toward IgG and IgA. However, serum levels of neither P. aeruginosa-specific antibodies nor interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) were significantly increased by FL, possibly because of decreased systemic exposure to bacteria. After challenge with heat-killed bacteria, which ensured equal exposures, FL-treated mice produced significantly greater levels of P. aeruginosa-specific IgG2a, which correlated with an increase in serum levels of interferon gamma and enhanced opsonization capacity. IL-12, IL-10, and transforming growth factor beta were significantly increased in FL-treated mice, regardless of the type of challenge. These findings indicate that FL treatments after burn injury enhance cytokine responses to recall antigens and increase bacterial clearance. In addition, through its ability to promote TH1-associated antigen-specific responses, FL may have potential as an immunotherapy to enhance adaptive immunity after severe burn injury.
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16 MeSH Terms
Endogenous Fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 ligand levels are not altered in mice after a severe burn and infection.
Bohannon JK, Cui W, Toliver-Kinsky T
(2009) BMC Immunol 10: 47
MeSH Terms: Animals, Burns, Dendritic Cells, Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor, Interferon-gamma, Male, Membrane Proteins, Mice, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Pseudomonas Infections, T-Lymphocytes
Show Abstract · Added February 18, 2016
BACKGROUND - Fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 ligand (Flt3L) is a hemopoietic cytokine and dendritic cell (DC) growth factor that promotes the proliferation and differentiation of progenitor cells into DCs. We have previously found that treatment of severely burned mice with recombinant Flt3L significantly enhances DC production and bacterial clearance from infected burn wounds, and increases global immune cell activation and survival in response to a burn wound infection. These significant benefits of Flt3L treatment after burn injury have prompted the question of whether or not severe burn injury induces deficits in endogenous Flt3L levels that could affect DCs and subsequent responses to infection.
RESULTS - To address this, male BALB/c mice received a 30% total body surface area scald burn. Blood, spleens, and wound-draining lymph nodes were harvested at various time-points after injury. Some mice received a wound inoculation with P. aeruginosa. Murine Flt3L and G-CSF levels were measured by ELISA. Burn injury had no significant effect on Flt3L levels at any post-burn time-point examined compared to normal Flt3L levels in the sera, spleen, or lymph nodes. Additionally, Flt3L levels in the sera, spleen, and lymph nodes were not significantly altered when wounds were inoculated on the day of burn injury or at post-burn time points examined. Alternatively, levels of G-CSF were increased in response to burn injury and burn wound infection. Additionally, DC numbers and functions were not altered following burn injury alone. There was no significant difference between the number of DCs in the spleens of sham-injured mice and mice at 5 days after burn injury. When naïve T cells from sham-injured mice were co-cultured with DCs from either sham- or burn-injured mice, IFN-gamma production was similar, however, IFN-gamma levels produced by T cells harvested from burn-injured mice were significantly lower than those produced by T cells from sham mice, regardless of which DC group, sham or burn, was used in the coculture.
CONCLUSION - These data suggest that the beneficial effects of Flt3L treatments after burn injury are not due to correction of a burn-associated Flt3L deficiency but rather, are likely due to supplementary stimulation of DC production and immune responses to infection.
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11 MeSH Terms