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Bone collagen network integrity and transverse fracture toughness of human cortical bone.
Willett TL, Dapaah DY, Uppuganti S, Granke M, Nyman JS
(2019) Bone 120: 187-193
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Bone and Bones, Collagen, Cortical Bone, Female, Fractures, Bone, Humans, Linear Models, Male, Middle Aged, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added November 13, 2018
Greater understanding of the determinants of skeletal fragility is highly sought due to the great burden that bone affecting diseases and fractures have on economies, societies and health care systems. Being a complex, hierarchical composite of collagen type-I and non-stoichiometric substituted hydroxyapatite, bone derives toughness from its organic phase. In this study, we tested whether early observations that a strong correlation between bone collagen integrity measured by thermomechanical methods and work to fracture exist in a more general and heterogeneous sampling of the population. Neighboring uniform specimens from an established, highly characterized and previously published collection of human cortical bone samples (femur mid-shaft) were decalcified in EDTA. Fifty-four of the original 62 donors were included (26 male and 28 females; ages 21-101 years; aging, osteoporosis, diabetes and cancer). Following decalcification, bone collagen was tested using hydrothermal isometric tension (HIT) testing in order to measure the collagen's thermal stability (denaturation temperature, T) and network connectivity (maximum rate of isometric tension generation; Max.Slope). We used linear regression and general linear models (GLMs) with several explanatory variables to determine whether relationships between HIT parameters and generally accepted bone quality factors (e.g., cortical porosity, pentosidine content [pen], pyridinoline content [pyd]), age, and measures of fracture toughness (crack initiation fracture toughness, K, and total energy release/dissipation rate evaluated at the point of unstable fast fracture, J-int) were significant. Bone collagen connectivity (Max.Slope) correlated well with the measures of fracture toughness (R = 24-35%), and to a lesser degree with bound water fraction (BW; R = 7.9%) and pore water fraction (PW; R = 9.1%). Significant correlations with age, apparent volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD), and mature enzymatic [pyd] and non-enzymatic collagen crosslinks [pen] were not detected. GLMs found that Max.Slope and vBMD (or BW), with or without age as additional covariate, all significantly explained the variance in Kinit (adjusted-R = 36.7-49.0%). Also, the best-fit model for J-int (adjusted-R = 35.7%) included only age and Max.Slope as explanatory variables with Max.Slope contributing twice as much as age. Max.Slope and BW without age were also significant predictors of J-int (adjusted-R = 35.5%). In conclusion, bone collagen integrity as measured by thermomechanical methods is a key factor in cortical bone fracture toughness. This study further demonstrates that greater attention should be paid to degradation of the overall organic phase, rather than a specific biomarker (e.g. [pen]), when seeking to understand elevated fracture rates in aging and disease.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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13 MeSH Terms
Enrichment and detection of bone disseminated tumor cells in models of low tumor burden.
Sowder ME, Johnson RW
(2018) Sci Rep 8: 14299
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antigens, CD, Bone Marrow, Bone and Bones, Estradiol, Humans, MCF-7 Cells, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Mice, Nude, Models, Biological, Neoplasms, Osteolysis, Time Factors, Tumor Burden
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Breast cancer cells frequently home to the bone, but the mechanisms controlling tumor colonization of the bone marrow remain unclear. We report significant enrichment of bone-disseminated estrogen receptor positive human MCF7 cells by 17 β-estradiol (E2) following intracardiac inoculation. Using flow cytometric and quantitative PCR approaches, tumor cells were detected in >80% of MCF7 tumor-inoculated mice, regardless of E2, suggesting that E2 is not required for MCF7 dissemination to the bone marrow. Furthermore, we propose two additional models in which to study prolonged latency periods by bone-disseminated tumor cells: murine D2.0R and human SUM159 breast carcinoma cells. Tumor cells were detected in bone marrow of up to 100% of D2.0R and SUM159-inoculated mice depending on the detection method. These findings establish novel models of bone colonization in which to study mechanisms underlying tumor cell seeding to the marrow and prolonged latency, and provide highly sensitive methods to detect these rare events.
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14 MeSH Terms
Innate Immunity to : Evolving Paradigms in Soft Tissue and Invasive Infections.
Brandt SL, Putnam NE, Cassat JE, Serezani CH
(2018) J Immunol 200: 3871-3880
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bone and Bones, Humans, Immunity, Innate, Skin, Staphylococcal Infections, Staphylococcus aureus
Show Abstract · Added March 18, 2020
causes a wide range of diseases that together embody a significant public health burden. Aided by metabolic flexibility and a large virulence repertoire, has the remarkable ability to hematogenously disseminate and infect various tissues, including skin, lung, heart, and bone, among others. The hallmark lesions of invasive staphylococcal infections, abscesses, simultaneously denote the powerful innate immune responses to tissue invasion as well as the ability of staphylococci to persist within these lesions. In this article, we review the innate immune responses to during infection of skin and bone, which serve as paradigms for soft tissue and bone disease, respectively.
Copyright © 2018 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.
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2 Members
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MeSH Terms
Simple staging system for osteosarcoma performs equivalently to the AJCC and MSTS systems.
Cates JMM
(2018) J Orthop Res 36: 2802-2808
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Bone Neoplasms, Bone and Bones, Female, Humans, Male, Neoplasm Metastasis, Neoplasm Staging, Osteosarcoma, Prognosis, Retrospective Studies, SEER Program, United States, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added November 1, 2018
Both the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) and Musculoskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS) staging systems for skeletal sarcomas have major weaknesses. A revised staging system for osteosarcoma (the Vanderbilt system) was developed based on exploratory analyses of the relative prognostic impacts of histologic grade, tumor size, local tumor extension, and specific anatomic sites of metastasis using case records from the National Cancer Database (N = 4,285). AJCC, MSTS, and Vanderbilt staging schemes were then compared using a separate, population-based cancer registry (the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database; N = 2,246) as a validation dataset. Predictive accuracy for 5-year sarcoma-specific survival was evaluated by comparing areas under receiver-operating characteristic curves generated from logistic regression. Three different concordance indices and Bayesian information criteria were also calculated for model comparisons. The Vanderbilt staging system showed comparable predictive accuracy for 5-year disease-specific survival (65%) compared to the AJCC (67%) and MSTS (67%) staging systems. Most cross-comparisons of model concordance were not significantly different either. Bayesian information criterion was lowest for the MSTS staging system. Substaging osteosarcoma by current anatomical criteria is ineffectual. A simplified staging system based only on histologic grade and the presence of distant metastasis to any anatomic site performs similarly to the current AJCC and MSTS staging systems by multiple statistical criteria and is proposed for clinical and pathological staging of osteosarcomas of the non-pelvic appendicular and non-spinal axial skeleton. © 2018 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 36:2802-2808, 2018.
© 2018 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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15 MeSH Terms
The Role of Matrix Composition in the Mechanical Behavior of Bone.
Unal M, Creecy A, Nyman JS
(2018) Curr Osteoporos Rep 16: 205-215
MeSH Terms: Biomechanical Phenomena, Bone Density, Bone Matrix, Bone and Bones, Cancellous Bone, Collagen Type I, Fractures, Bone, Glycation End Products, Advanced, Humans, Minerals, Protein Processing, Post-Translational, Tropocollagen, Water
Show Abstract · Added April 9, 2018
PURPOSE OF REVIEW - While thinning of the cortices or trabeculae weakens bone, age-related changes in matrix composition also lower fracture resistance. This review summarizes how the organic matrix, mineral phase, and water compartments influence the mechanical behavior of bone, thereby identifying characteristics important to fracture risk.
RECENT FINDINGS - In the synthesis of the organic matrix, tropocollagen experiences various post-translational modifications that facilitate a highly organized fibril of collagen I with a preferred orientation giving bone extensibility and several toughening mechanisms. Being a ceramic, mineral is brittle but increases the strength of bone as its content within the organic matrix increases. With time, hydroxyapatite-like crystals experience carbonate substitutions, the consequence of which remains to be understood. Water participates in hydrogen bonding with organic matrix and in electrostatic attractions with mineral phase, thereby providing stability to collagen-mineral interface and ductility to bone. Clinical tools sensitive to age- and disease-related changes in matrix composition that the affect mechanical behavior of bone could potentially improve fracture risk assessment.
1 Communities
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13 MeSH Terms
3D bone models to study the complex physical and cellular interactions between tumor and the bone microenvironment.
Vanderburgh JP, Guelcher SA, Sterling JA
(2018) J Cell Biochem 119: 5053-5059
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bone Neoplasms, Bone and Bones, Cellular Microenvironment, Humans, Models, Biological, Tissue Engineering, Tissue Scaffolds, Tumor Microenvironment
Show Abstract · Added April 15, 2019
As the complexity of interactions between tumor and its microenvironment has become more evident, a critical need to engineer in vitro models that veritably recapitulate the 3D microenvironment and relevant cell populations has arisen. This need has caused many groups to move away from the traditional 2D, tissue culture plastic paradigms in favor of 3D models with materials that more closely replicate the in vivo milieu. Creating these 3D models remains a difficult endeavor for hard and soft tissues alike as the selection of materials, fabrication processes, and optimal conditions for supporting multiple cell populations makes model development a nontrivial task. Bone tissue in particular is uniquely difficult to model in part because of the limited availability of materials that can accurately capture bone rigidity and architecture, and also due to the dependence of both bone and tumor cell behavior on mechanical signaling. Additionally, the bone is a complex cellular microenvironment with multiple cell types present, including relatively immature, pluripotent cells in the bone marrow. This prospect will focus on the current 3D models in development to more accurately replicate the bone microenvironment, which will help facilitate improved understanding of bone turnover, tumor-bone interactions, and drug response. These studies have demonstrated the importance of accurately modelling the bone microenvironment in order to fully understand signaling and drug response, and the significant effects that model properties such as architecture, rigidity, and dynamic mechanical factors have on tumor and bone cell response.
© 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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1 Members
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9 MeSH Terms
Hallmarks of Bone Metastasis.
Johnson RW, Suva LJ
(2018) Calcif Tissue Int 102: 141-151
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bone Marrow Cells, Bone Neoplasms, Bone and Bones, Breast Neoplasms, Female, Humans, Mice, Osteoblasts, Osteoclasts, Osteolysis
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Breast cancer bone metastasis develops as the result of a series of complex interactions between tumor cells, bone marrow cells, and resident bone cells. The net effect of these interactions are the disruption of normal bone homeostasis, often with significantly increased osteoclast and osteoblast activity, which has provided a rational target for controlling tumor progression, with little or no emphasis on tumor eradication. Indeed, the clinical course of metastatic breast cancer is relatively long, with patients likely to experience sequential skeletal-related events (SREs), often over lengthy periods of time, even up to decades. These SREs include bone pain, fractures, and spinal cord compression, all of which may profoundly impair a patient's quality-of-life. Our understanding of the contributions of the host bone and bone marrow cells to the control of tumor progression has grown over the years, yet the focus of virtually all available treatments remains on the control of resident bone cells, primarily osteoclasts. In this perspective, our focus is to move away from the current emphasis on the control of bone cells and focus our attention on the hallmarks of bone metastatic tumor cells and how these differ from primary tumor cells and normal host cells. In our opinion, there remains a largely unmet medical need to develop and utilize therapies that impede metastatic tumor cells while sparing normal host bone and bone marrow cells. This perspective examines the impact of metastatic tumor cells on the bone microenvironment and proposes potential new directions for uncovering the important mechanisms driving metastatic progression in bone based on the hallmarks of bone metastasis.
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MeSH Terms
Engineering 3D Models of Tumors and Bone to Understand Tumor-Induced Bone Disease and Improve Treatments.
Kwakwa KA, Vanderburgh JP, Guelcher SA, Sterling JA
(2017) Curr Osteoporos Rep 15: 247-254
MeSH Terms: Bone Neoplasms, Bone and Bones, Collagen, Humans, Models, Biological, Polyurethanes, Printing, Three-Dimensional, Silk, Tissue Engineering, Tissue Scaffolds, Tumor Microenvironment
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2018
PURPOSE OF REVIEW - Bone is a structurally unique microenvironment that presents many challenges for the development of 3D models for studying bone physiology and diseases, including cancer. As researchers continue to investigate the interactions within the bone microenvironment, the development of 3D models of bone has become critical.
RECENT FINDINGS - 3D models have been developed that replicate some properties of bone, but have not fully reproduced the complex structural and cellular composition of the bone microenvironment. This review will discuss 3D models including polyurethane, silk, and collagen scaffolds that have been developed to study tumor-induced bone disease. In addition, we discuss 3D printing techniques used to better replicate the structure of bone. 3D models that better replicate the bone microenvironment will help researchers better understand the dynamic interactions between tumors and the bone microenvironment, ultimately leading to better models for testing therapeutics and predicting patient outcomes.
0 Communities
1 Members
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11 MeSH Terms
Hypoxia and Bone Metastatic Disease.
Johnson RW, Sowder ME, Giaccia AJ
(2017) Curr Osteoporos Rep 15: 231-238
MeSH Terms: Bone Marrow, Bone Neoplasms, Bone and Bones, Breast Neoplasms, Female, Humans, Hypoxia, Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, Neoplasm Metastasis, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
PURPOSE OF REVIEW - This review highlights our current knowledge of oxygen tensions in the bone marrow, and how low oxygen tensions (hypoxia) regulate tumor metastasis to and colonization of the bone marrow.
RECENT FINDINGS - The bone marrow is a relatively hypoxic microenvironment, but oxygen tensions fluctuate throughout the marrow cavity and across the endosteal and periosteal surfaces. Recent advances in imaging have made it possible to better characterize these fluctuations in bone oxygenation, but technical challenges remain. We have compiled evidence from multiple groups that suggests that hypoxia or hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) signaling may induce spontaneous metastasis to the bone and promote tumor colonization of bone, particularly in the case of breast cancer dissemination to the bone marrow. We are beginning to understand oxygenation patterns within the bone compartment and the role for hypoxia and HIF signaling in tumor cell dissemination to the bone marrow, but further studies are warranted.
0 Communities
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MeSH Terms
Skeletal Colonization by Breast Cancer Cells Is Stimulated by an Osteoblast and β2AR-Dependent Neo-Angiogenic Switch.
Mulcrone PL, Campbell JP, Clément-Demange L, Anbinder AL, Merkel AR, Brekken RA, Sterling JA, Elefteriou F
(2017) J Bone Miner Res 32: 1442-1454
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bone and Bones, Breast Neoplasms, Cell Line, Tumor, Coculture Techniques, Female, Humans, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Neoplasm Metastasis, Neoplasm Proteins, Neovascularization, Pathologic, Osteoblasts, Receptors, Adrenergic, beta-2, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A
Show Abstract · Added April 26, 2017
The skeleton is a common site for breast cancer metastasis. Although significant progress has been made to manage osteolytic bone lesions, the mechanisms driving the early steps of the bone metastatic process are still not sufficiently understood to design efficacious strategies needed to inhibit this process and offer preventative therapeutic options. Progression and recurrence of breast cancer, as well as reduced survival of patients with breast cancer, are associated with chronic stress, a condition known to stimulate sympathetic nerve outflow. In this study, we show that stimulation of the beta 2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) by isoproterenol, used as a pharmacological surrogate of sympathetic nerve activation, led to increased blood vessel density and Vegf-a expression in bone. It also raised levels of secreted Vegf-a in osteoblast cultures, and accordingly, the conditioned media from isoproterenol-treated osteoblast cultures promoted new vessel formation in two ex vivo models of angiogenesis. Blocking the interaction between Vegf-a and its receptor, Vegfr2, blunted the increase in vessel density induced by isoproterenol. Genetic loss of the β2AR globally, or specifically in type 1 collagen-expressing osteoblasts, diminished the increase in Vegf-positive osteoblast number and bone vessel density induced by isoproterenol, and reduced the higher incidence of bone metastatic lesions induced by isoproterenol after intracardiac injection of an osteotropic variant of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Inhibition of the interaction between Vegf-a and Vegfr2 with the blocking antibody mcr84 also prevented the increase in bone vascular density and bone metastasis triggered by isoproterenol. Together, these results indicate that stimulation of the β2AR in osteoblasts triggers a Vegf-dependent neo-angiogenic switch that promotes bone vascular density and the colonization of the bone microenvironment by metastatic breast cancer cells. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.
© 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.
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15 MeSH Terms