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Simple staging system for osteosarcoma performs equivalently to the AJCC and MSTS systems.
Cates JMM
(2018) J Orthop Res 36: 2802-2808
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Bone Neoplasms, Bone and Bones, Female, Humans, Male, Neoplasm Metastasis, Neoplasm Staging, Osteosarcoma, Prognosis, Retrospective Studies, SEER Program, United States, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added November 1, 2018
Both the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) and Musculoskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS) staging systems for skeletal sarcomas have major weaknesses. A revised staging system for osteosarcoma (the Vanderbilt system) was developed based on exploratory analyses of the relative prognostic impacts of histologic grade, tumor size, local tumor extension, and specific anatomic sites of metastasis using case records from the National Cancer Database (N = 4,285). AJCC, MSTS, and Vanderbilt staging schemes were then compared using a separate, population-based cancer registry (the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database; N = 2,246) as a validation dataset. Predictive accuracy for 5-year sarcoma-specific survival was evaluated by comparing areas under receiver-operating characteristic curves generated from logistic regression. Three different concordance indices and Bayesian information criteria were also calculated for model comparisons. The Vanderbilt staging system showed comparable predictive accuracy for 5-year disease-specific survival (65%) compared to the AJCC (67%) and MSTS (67%) staging systems. Most cross-comparisons of model concordance were not significantly different either. Bayesian information criterion was lowest for the MSTS staging system. Substaging osteosarcoma by current anatomical criteria is ineffectual. A simplified staging system based only on histologic grade and the presence of distant metastasis to any anatomic site performs similarly to the current AJCC and MSTS staging systems by multiple statistical criteria and is proposed for clinical and pathological staging of osteosarcomas of the non-pelvic appendicular and non-spinal axial skeleton. © 2018 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 36:2802-2808, 2018.
© 2018 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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15 MeSH Terms
The Role of Matrix Composition in the Mechanical Behavior of Bone.
Unal M, Creecy A, Nyman JS
(2018) Curr Osteoporos Rep 16: 205-215
MeSH Terms: Biomechanical Phenomena, Bone Density, Bone Matrix, Bone and Bones, Cancellous Bone, Collagen Type I, Fractures, Bone, Glycation End Products, Advanced, Humans, Minerals, Protein Processing, Post-Translational, Tropocollagen, Water
Show Abstract · Added April 9, 2018
PURPOSE OF REVIEW - While thinning of the cortices or trabeculae weakens bone, age-related changes in matrix composition also lower fracture resistance. This review summarizes how the organic matrix, mineral phase, and water compartments influence the mechanical behavior of bone, thereby identifying characteristics important to fracture risk.
RECENT FINDINGS - In the synthesis of the organic matrix, tropocollagen experiences various post-translational modifications that facilitate a highly organized fibril of collagen I with a preferred orientation giving bone extensibility and several toughening mechanisms. Being a ceramic, mineral is brittle but increases the strength of bone as its content within the organic matrix increases. With time, hydroxyapatite-like crystals experience carbonate substitutions, the consequence of which remains to be understood. Water participates in hydrogen bonding with organic matrix and in electrostatic attractions with mineral phase, thereby providing stability to collagen-mineral interface and ductility to bone. Clinical tools sensitive to age- and disease-related changes in matrix composition that the affect mechanical behavior of bone could potentially improve fracture risk assessment.
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13 MeSH Terms
3D bone models to study the complex physical and cellular interactions between tumor and the bone microenvironment.
Vanderburgh JP, Guelcher SA, Sterling JA
(2018) J Cell Biochem 119: 5053-5059
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bone Neoplasms, Bone and Bones, Cellular Microenvironment, Humans, Models, Biological, Tissue Engineering, Tissue Scaffolds, Tumor Microenvironment
Show Abstract · Added April 15, 2019
As the complexity of interactions between tumor and its microenvironment has become more evident, a critical need to engineer in vitro models that veritably recapitulate the 3D microenvironment and relevant cell populations has arisen. This need has caused many groups to move away from the traditional 2D, tissue culture plastic paradigms in favor of 3D models with materials that more closely replicate the in vivo milieu. Creating these 3D models remains a difficult endeavor for hard and soft tissues alike as the selection of materials, fabrication processes, and optimal conditions for supporting multiple cell populations makes model development a nontrivial task. Bone tissue in particular is uniquely difficult to model in part because of the limited availability of materials that can accurately capture bone rigidity and architecture, and also due to the dependence of both bone and tumor cell behavior on mechanical signaling. Additionally, the bone is a complex cellular microenvironment with multiple cell types present, including relatively immature, pluripotent cells in the bone marrow. This prospect will focus on the current 3D models in development to more accurately replicate the bone microenvironment, which will help facilitate improved understanding of bone turnover, tumor-bone interactions, and drug response. These studies have demonstrated the importance of accurately modelling the bone microenvironment in order to fully understand signaling and drug response, and the significant effects that model properties such as architecture, rigidity, and dynamic mechanical factors have on tumor and bone cell response.
© 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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9 MeSH Terms
Hallmarks of Bone Metastasis.
Johnson RW, Suva LJ
(2018) Calcif Tissue Int 102: 141-151
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bone Marrow Cells, Bone Neoplasms, Bone and Bones, Breast Neoplasms, Female, Humans, Mice, Osteoblasts, Osteoclasts, Osteolysis
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Breast cancer bone metastasis develops as the result of a series of complex interactions between tumor cells, bone marrow cells, and resident bone cells. The net effect of these interactions are the disruption of normal bone homeostasis, often with significantly increased osteoclast and osteoblast activity, which has provided a rational target for controlling tumor progression, with little or no emphasis on tumor eradication. Indeed, the clinical course of metastatic breast cancer is relatively long, with patients likely to experience sequential skeletal-related events (SREs), often over lengthy periods of time, even up to decades. These SREs include bone pain, fractures, and spinal cord compression, all of which may profoundly impair a patient's quality-of-life. Our understanding of the contributions of the host bone and bone marrow cells to the control of tumor progression has grown over the years, yet the focus of virtually all available treatments remains on the control of resident bone cells, primarily osteoclasts. In this perspective, our focus is to move away from the current emphasis on the control of bone cells and focus our attention on the hallmarks of bone metastatic tumor cells and how these differ from primary tumor cells and normal host cells. In our opinion, there remains a largely unmet medical need to develop and utilize therapies that impede metastatic tumor cells while sparing normal host bone and bone marrow cells. This perspective examines the impact of metastatic tumor cells on the bone microenvironment and proposes potential new directions for uncovering the important mechanisms driving metastatic progression in bone based on the hallmarks of bone metastasis.
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Engineering 3D Models of Tumors and Bone to Understand Tumor-Induced Bone Disease and Improve Treatments.
Kwakwa KA, Vanderburgh JP, Guelcher SA, Sterling JA
(2017) Curr Osteoporos Rep 15: 247-254
MeSH Terms: Bone Neoplasms, Bone and Bones, Collagen, Humans, Models, Biological, Polyurethanes, Printing, Three-Dimensional, Silk, Tissue Engineering, Tissue Scaffolds, Tumor Microenvironment
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2018
PURPOSE OF REVIEW - Bone is a structurally unique microenvironment that presents many challenges for the development of 3D models for studying bone physiology and diseases, including cancer. As researchers continue to investigate the interactions within the bone microenvironment, the development of 3D models of bone has become critical.
RECENT FINDINGS - 3D models have been developed that replicate some properties of bone, but have not fully reproduced the complex structural and cellular composition of the bone microenvironment. This review will discuss 3D models including polyurethane, silk, and collagen scaffolds that have been developed to study tumor-induced bone disease. In addition, we discuss 3D printing techniques used to better replicate the structure of bone. 3D models that better replicate the bone microenvironment will help researchers better understand the dynamic interactions between tumors and the bone microenvironment, ultimately leading to better models for testing therapeutics and predicting patient outcomes.
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11 MeSH Terms
Hypoxia and Bone Metastatic Disease.
Johnson RW, Sowder ME, Giaccia AJ
(2017) Curr Osteoporos Rep 15: 231-238
MeSH Terms: Bone Marrow, Bone Neoplasms, Bone and Bones, Breast Neoplasms, Female, Humans, Hypoxia, Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, Neoplasm Metastasis, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
PURPOSE OF REVIEW - This review highlights our current knowledge of oxygen tensions in the bone marrow, and how low oxygen tensions (hypoxia) regulate tumor metastasis to and colonization of the bone marrow.
RECENT FINDINGS - The bone marrow is a relatively hypoxic microenvironment, but oxygen tensions fluctuate throughout the marrow cavity and across the endosteal and periosteal surfaces. Recent advances in imaging have made it possible to better characterize these fluctuations in bone oxygenation, but technical challenges remain. We have compiled evidence from multiple groups that suggests that hypoxia or hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) signaling may induce spontaneous metastasis to the bone and promote tumor colonization of bone, particularly in the case of breast cancer dissemination to the bone marrow. We are beginning to understand oxygenation patterns within the bone compartment and the role for hypoxia and HIF signaling in tumor cell dissemination to the bone marrow, but further studies are warranted.
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Skeletal Colonization by Breast Cancer Cells Is Stimulated by an Osteoblast and β2AR-Dependent Neo-Angiogenic Switch.
Mulcrone PL, Campbell JP, Clément-Demange L, Anbinder AL, Merkel AR, Brekken RA, Sterling JA, Elefteriou F
(2017) J Bone Miner Res 32: 1442-1454
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bone and Bones, Breast Neoplasms, Cell Line, Tumor, Coculture Techniques, Female, Humans, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Neoplasm Metastasis, Neoplasm Proteins, Neovascularization, Pathologic, Osteoblasts, Receptors, Adrenergic, beta-2, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A
Show Abstract · Added April 26, 2017
The skeleton is a common site for breast cancer metastasis. Although significant progress has been made to manage osteolytic bone lesions, the mechanisms driving the early steps of the bone metastatic process are still not sufficiently understood to design efficacious strategies needed to inhibit this process and offer preventative therapeutic options. Progression and recurrence of breast cancer, as well as reduced survival of patients with breast cancer, are associated with chronic stress, a condition known to stimulate sympathetic nerve outflow. In this study, we show that stimulation of the beta 2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) by isoproterenol, used as a pharmacological surrogate of sympathetic nerve activation, led to increased blood vessel density and Vegf-a expression in bone. It also raised levels of secreted Vegf-a in osteoblast cultures, and accordingly, the conditioned media from isoproterenol-treated osteoblast cultures promoted new vessel formation in two ex vivo models of angiogenesis. Blocking the interaction between Vegf-a and its receptor, Vegfr2, blunted the increase in vessel density induced by isoproterenol. Genetic loss of the β2AR globally, or specifically in type 1 collagen-expressing osteoblasts, diminished the increase in Vegf-positive osteoblast number and bone vessel density induced by isoproterenol, and reduced the higher incidence of bone metastatic lesions induced by isoproterenol after intracardiac injection of an osteotropic variant of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Inhibition of the interaction between Vegf-a and Vegfr2 with the blocking antibody mcr84 also prevented the increase in bone vascular density and bone metastasis triggered by isoproterenol. Together, these results indicate that stimulation of the β2AR in osteoblasts triggers a Vegf-dependent neo-angiogenic switch that promotes bone vascular density and the colonization of the bone microenvironment by metastatic breast cancer cells. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.
© 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.
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15 MeSH Terms
The impact of SGLT2 inhibitors, compared with insulin, on diabetic bone disease in a mouse model of type 1 diabetes.
Thrailkill KM, Nyman JS, Bunn RC, Uppuganti S, Thompson KL, Lumpkin CK, Kalaitzoglou E, Fowlkes JL
(2017) Bone 94: 141-151
MeSH Terms: Animals, Biomarkers, Blood Glucose, Bone Diseases, Metabolic, Bone Resorption, Bone and Bones, Canagliflozin, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1, Disease Models, Animal, Insulin, Linear Models, Male, Mice, Inbred DBA, Phenotype, Sodium-Glucose Transporter 2, Sodium-Glucose Transporter 2 Inhibitors
Show Abstract · Added January 9, 2017
Skeletal co-morbidities in type 1 diabetes include an increased risk for fracture and delayed fracture healing, which are intertwined with disease duration and the presence of other diabetic complications. As such, chronic hyperglycemia is undoubtedly a major contributor to these outcomes, despite standard insulin-replacement therapy. Therefore, using the streptozotocin (STZ)-induced model of hypoinsulinemic hyperglycemia in DBA/2J male mice, we compared the effects of two glucose lowering therapies on the fracture resistance of bone and markers of bone turnover. Twelve week-old diabetic (DM) mice were treated for 9weeks with: 1) oral canagliflozin (CANA, dose range ~10-16mg/kg/day), an inhibitor of the renal sodium-dependent glucose co-transporter type 2 (SGLT2); 2) subcutaneous insulin, via minipump (INS, 0.125units/day); 3) co-therapy (CANA+INS); or 4) no treatment (STZ, without therapy). These groups were also compared to non-diabetic control groups. Untreated diabetic mice experienced increased bone resorption and significant deficits in cortical and trabecular bone that contributed to structural weakness of the femur mid-shaft and the lumbar vertebra, as determined by three-point bending and compression tests, respectively. Treatment with either canagliflozin or insulin alone only partially rectified hyperglycemia and the diabetic bone phenotype. However, when used in combination, normalization of glycemic control was achieved, and a prevention of the DM-related deterioration in bone microarchitecture and bone strength occurred, due to additive effects of canagliflozin and insulin. Nevertheless, CANA-treated mice, whether diabetic or non-diabetic, demonstrated an increase in urinary calcium loss; FGF23 was also increased in CANA-treated DM mice. These findings could herald ongoing bone mineral losses following CANA exposure, suggesting that certain CANA-induced skeletal consequences might detract from therapeutic improvements in glycemic control, as they relate to diabetic bone disease.
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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16 MeSH Terms
Hedgehog and TGFβ signaling converge on Gli2 to control bony invasion and bone destruction in oral squamous cell carcinoma.
Cannonier SA, Gonzales CB, Ely K, Guelcher SA, Sterling JA
(2016) Oncotarget 7: 76062-76075
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bone and Bones, Carcinoma, Squamous Cell, Cell Line, Tumor, Disease Models, Animal, Gene Expression, Hedgehog Proteins, Heterografts, Humans, Mice, Mouth Neoplasms, Neoplasm Invasiveness, Nuclear Proteins, Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein, Signal Transduction, Transforming Growth Factor beta, Zinc Finger Protein Gli2
Show Abstract · Added April 26, 2017
Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC) is the sixth most common cancer worldwide. OSCC invasion into the lymph nodes and mandible correlates with increased rates of recurrence and lower overall survival. Tumors that infiltrate mandibular bone proliferate rapidly and induce bone destruction. While survival rates have increased 12% over the last 20 years, this improvement is attributed to general advances in prevention, earlier detection, and updated treatments. Additionally, despite decades of research, the molecular mechanisms of OSCC invasion into the mandible are not well understood. Parathyroid Hormone-related Protein (PTHrP), has been shown to be essential for mandibular invasion in OSCC animal models, and our previous studies demonstrate that the transcription factor Gli2 increases PTHrP expression in tumor metastasis to bone. In OSCC, we investigated regulators of Gli2, including Hedgehog, TGFβ, and Wnt signaling to elucidate how PTHrP expression is controlled. Here we show that canonical Hedgehog and TGFβ signaling cooperate to increase PTHrP expression and mandibular invasion in a Gli2-dependent manner. Additionally, in an orthotopic model of mandibular invasion, inhibition of Gli2 using shRNA resulted in a significant decrease of both PTHrP expression and bony invasion. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that multiple signaling pathways converge on Gli2 to mediate PTHrP expression and bony invasion, highlighting Gli2 as a therapeutic target to prevent bony invasion in OSCC.
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17 MeSH Terms
Murine Oncostatin M Acts via Leukemia Inhibitory Factor Receptor to Phosphorylate Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) but Not STAT1, an Effect That Protects Bone Mass.
Walker EC, Johnson RW, Hu Y, Brennan HJ, Poulton IJ, Zhang JG, Jenkins BJ, Smyth GK, Nicola NA, Sims NA
(2016) J Biol Chem 291: 21703-21716
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bone Diseases, Metabolic, Bone and Bones, Cytokine Receptor gp130, Disease Models, Animal, Humans, Leukemia Inhibitory Factor Receptor alpha Subunit, Mice, Oncostatin M, Oncostatin M Receptor beta Subunit, Organ Size, Osteocytes, Phosphorylation, STAT1 Transcription Factor, STAT3 Transcription Factor
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Oncostatin M (OSM) and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) are IL-6 family members with a wide range of biological functions. Human OSM (hOSM) and murine LIF (mLIF) act in mouse cells via a LIF receptor (LIFR)-glycoprotein 130 (gp130) heterodimer. In contrast, murine OSM (mOSM) signals mainly via an OSM receptor (OSMR)-gp130 heterodimer and binds with only very low affinity to mLIFR. hOSM and mLIF stimulate bone remodeling by both reducing osteocytic sclerostin and up-regulating the pro-osteoclastic factor receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) in osteoblasts. In the absence of OSMR, mOSM still strongly suppressed sclerostin and stimulated bone formation but did not induce RANKL, suggesting that intracellular signaling activated by the low affinity interaction of mOSM with mLIFR is different from the downstream effects when mLIF or hOSM interacts with the same receptor. Both STAT1 and STAT3 were activated by mOSM in wild type cells or by mLIF/hOSM in wild type and Osmr cells. In contrast, in Osmr primary osteocyte-like cells stimulated with mOSM (therefore acting through mLIFR), microarray expression profiling and Western blotting analysis identified preferential phosphorylation of STAT3 and induction of its target genes but not of STAT1 and its target genes; this correlated with reduced phosphorylation of both gp130 and LIFR. In a mouse model of spontaneous osteopenia caused by hyperactivation of STAT1/3 signaling downstream of gp130 (gp130), STAT1 deletion rescued the osteopenic phenotype, indicating a beneficial effect of promoting STAT3 signaling over STAT1 downstream of gp130 in this low bone mass condition, and this may have therapeutic value.
© 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.
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