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Utility of Blood Culture Among Children Hospitalized With Community-Acquired Pneumonia.
Neuman MI, Hall M, Lipsett SC, Hersh AL, Williams DJ, Gerber JS, Brogan TV, Blaschke AJ, Grijalva CG, Parikh K, Ambroggio L, Shah SS, Pediatric Research in Inpatient Settings Network
(2017) Pediatrics 140:
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Anti-Bacterial Agents, Bacteremia, Bacteria, Blood Culture, Child, Child, Preschool, Community-Acquired Infections, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Hospitalization, Humans, Infant, Male, Microbial Sensitivity Tests, Penicillins, Pneumonia, Bacterial, Retrospective Studies
Show Abstract · Added July 27, 2018
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES - National guidelines recommend blood cultures for children hospitalized with presumed bacterial community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) that is moderate or severe. We sought to determine the prevalence of bacteremia and characterize the microbiology and penicillin-susceptibility patterns of positive blood culture results among children hospitalized with CAP.
METHODS - We conducted a cross-sectional study of children hospitalized with CAP in 6 children's hospitals from 2007 to 2011. We included children 3 months to 18 years of age with discharge diagnosis codes for CAP using a previously validated algorithm. We excluded children with complex chronic conditions. We reviewed microbiologic data and classified positive blood culture detections as pathogens or contaminants. Antibiotic-susceptibility patterns were assessed for all pathogens.
RESULTS - A total of 7509 children hospitalized with CAP were included over the 5-year study period. Overall, 34% of the children hospitalized with CAP had a blood culture performed; 65 (2.5% of patients with blood cultures; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.0%-3.2%) grew a pathogen. accounted for 78% of all detected pathogens. Among detected pathogens, 50 (82%) were susceptible to penicillin. Eleven children demonstrated growth of an organism nonsusceptible to penicillin, representing 0.43% (95% CI: 0.23%-0.77%) of children with blood cultures obtained and 0.15% (95% CI: 0.08%-0.26%) of all children hospitalized with CAP.
CONCLUSIONS - Among children without comorbidities hospitalized with CAP in a non-ICU setting, the rate of bacteremia was low, and isolated pathogens were usually susceptible to penicillin. Blood cultures may not be needed for most children hospitalized with CAP.
Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.
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Heart rate characteristic index monitoring for bloodstream infection in an NICU: a 3-year experience.
Coggins SA, Weitkamp JH, Grunwald L, Stark AR, Reese J, Walsh W, Wynn JL
(2016) Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed 101: F329-32
MeSH Terms: Bacteremia, Blood Culture, Cohort Studies, Electronic Health Records, Female, Heart Rate, Humans, Infant, Newborn, Infant, Premature, Intensive Care Units, Neonatal, Male, Monitoring, Physiologic, Neonatal Sepsis, Retrospective Studies, Statistics as Topic, United States
Show Abstract · Added February 21, 2016
BACKGROUND - Bloodstream infection (BSI) among neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) infants is a frequent problem associated with poor outcomes. Monitoring for abnormal heart rate characteristics (HRCs) may decrease infant mortality by alerting clinicians to sepsis before it becomes clinically apparent.
METHODS - HRC scores were acquired using the HRC (HeRO) monitor system from Medical Predictive Science Corporation and entered into the electronic medical record by bedside staff. We retrospectively analysed HRC scores recorded twice daily in the medical record during a 30-month period (1 January 2010 through 30 June 2012) for infants in the NICU at the Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt. We identified infants that met Centers for Disease Control criteria for late-onset BSI (>3 days of life) during the study period.
RESULTS - During the study period, we recorded 127 673 HRC scores from 2384 infants. We identified 46 infants with BSI. Although 8% (9701/127 673) of the HRC scores were ≥2 and 1% (1387/127 673) were ≥5, BSI (at any time) was observed in just 5% of patients with HRC scores ≥2, and 9% of patients with HRC scores ≥5. Of infants with BSI, 5/46 (11%) had at least one HRC score ≥5 and 17/46 (37%) had at least one score ≥2 recorded in the 48 h period prior to the evaluation that resulted in the first positive blood culture of the episode.
CONCLUSIONS - In our single-centre retrospective study, elevated HRC scores had limited ability to detect BSI. BSI was infrequent at any time during hospitalisation in infants with significantly elevated HRC scores.
Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/
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16 MeSH Terms