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Heterogeneous transgene expression in the retinas of the TH-RFP, TH-Cre, TH-BAC-Cre and DAT-Cre mouse lines.
Vuong HE, Pérez de Sevilla Müller L, Hardi CN, McMahon DG, Brecha NC
(2015) Neuroscience 307: 319-37
MeSH Terms: Animals, Biotin, Calbindin 2, Choline O-Acetyltransferase, Chromosomes, Artificial, Bacterial, Dopamine Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins, Female, Gene Expression Regulation, Glycine, Integrases, Luminescent Proteins, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Transgenic, RNA-Binding Proteins, Retina, Tyrosine 3-Monooxygenase, Visual Pathways, gamma-Aminobutyric Acid
Show Abstract · Added February 3, 2017
Transgenic mouse lines are essential tools for understanding the connectivity, physiology and function of neuronal circuits, including those in the retina. This report compares transgene expression in the retina of a tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-red fluorescent protein (RFP) mouse line with three catecholamine-related Cre recombinase mouse lines [TH-bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-, TH-, and dopamine transporter (DAT)-Cre] that were crossed with a ROSA26-tdTomato reporter line. Retinas were evaluated and immunostained with commonly used antibodies including those directed to TH, GABA and glycine to characterize the RFP or tdTomato fluorescent-labeled amacrine cells, and an antibody directed to RNA-binding protein with multiple splicing to identify ganglion cells. In TH-RFP retinas, types 1 and 2 dopamine (DA) amacrine cells were identified by their characteristic cellular morphology and type 1 DA cells by their expression of TH immunoreactivity. In the TH-BAC-, TH-, and DAT-tdTomato retinas, less than 1%, ∼ 6%, and 0%, respectively, of the fluorescent cells were the expected type 1 DA amacrine cells. Instead, in the TH-BAC-tdTomato retinas, fluorescently labeled AII amacrine cells were predominant, with some medium diameter ganglion cells. In TH-tdTomato retinas, fluorescence was in multiple neurochemical amacrine cell types, including four types of polyaxonal amacrine cells. In DAT-tdTomato retinas, fluorescence was in GABA immunoreactive amacrine cells, including two types of bistratified and two types of monostratified amacrine cells. Although each of the Cre lines was generated with the intent to specifically label DA cells, our findings show a cellular diversity in Cre expression in the adult retina and indicate the importance of careful characterization of transgene labeling patterns. These mouse lines with their distinctive cellular labeling patterns will be useful tools for future studies of retinal function and visual processing.
Published by Elsevier Ltd.
1 Communities
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20 MeSH Terms
Mutational analysis of cysteine residues of the insect odorant co-receptor (Orco) from Drosophila melanogaster reveals differential effects on agonist- and odorant-tuning receptor-dependent activation.
Turner RM, Derryberry SL, Kumar BN, Brittain T, Zwiebel LJ, Newcomb RD, Christie DL
(2014) J Biol Chem 289: 31837-45
MeSH Terms: Allosteric Site, Animals, Biotinylation, Calcium, Cysteine, DNA Mutational Analysis, Drosophila Proteins, Drosophila melanogaster, Epitopes, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Ion Channels, Kinetics, Mutagenesis, Site-Directed, Mutation, Odorants, Patch-Clamp Techniques, Protein Binding, Protein Structure, Tertiary, Receptors, Odorant, Thioglycolates, Triazoles
Show Abstract · Added February 19, 2015
Insect odorant receptors are heteromeric odorant-gated cation channels comprising a conventional odorant-sensitive tuning receptor (ORx) and a highly conserved co-receptor known as Orco. Orco is found only in insects, and very little is known about its structure and the mechanism leading to channel activation. In the absence of an ORx, Orco forms homomeric channels that can be activated by a synthetic agonist, VUAA1. Drosophila melanogaster Orco (DmelOrco) contains eight cysteine amino acid residues, six of which are highly conserved. In this study, we replaced individual cysteine residues with serine or alanine and expressed Orco mutants in Flp-In 293 T-Rex cells. Changes in intracellular Ca(2+) levels were used to determine responses to VUAA1. Replacement of two cysteines (Cys-429 and Cys-449) in a predicted intracellular loop (ICL3), individually or together, gave variants that all showed similar increases in the rate of response and sensitivity to VUAA1 compared with wild-type DmelOrco. Kinetic modeling indicated that the response of the Orco mutants to VUAA1 was faster than wild-type Orco. The enhanced sensitivity and faster response of the Cys mutants was confirmed by whole-cell voltage clamp electrophysiology. In contrast to the results from direct agonist activation of Orco, the two cysteine replacement mutants when co-expressed with a tuning receptor (DmelOR22a) showed an ∼10-fold decrease in potency for activation by 2-methyl hexanoate. Our work has shown that intracellular loop 3 is important for Orco channel activation. Importantly, this study also suggests differences in the structural requirements for the activation of homomeric and heteromeric Orco channel complexes.
© 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.
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22 MeSH Terms
Validation of DTI tractography-based measures of primary motor area connectivity in the squirrel monkey brain.
Gao Y, Choe AS, Stepniewska I, Li X, Avison MJ, Anderson AW
(2013) PLoS One 8: e75065
MeSH Terms: Animals, Biotinylation, Brain Mapping, Dextrans, Diffusion Tensor Imaging, Motor Cortex, Nerve Net, Saimiri, Staining and Labeling
Show Abstract · Added July 21, 2014
Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography provides noninvasive measures of structural cortico-cortical connectivity of the brain. However, the agreement between DTI-tractography-based measures and histological 'ground truth' has not been quantified. In this study, we reconstructed the 3D density distribution maps (DDM) of fibers labeled with an anatomical tracer, biotinylated dextran amine (BDA), as well as DTI tractography-derived streamlines connecting the primary motor (M1) cortex to other cortical regions in the squirrel monkey brain. We evaluated the agreement in M1-cortical connectivity between the fibers labeled in the brain tissue and DTI streamlines on a regional and voxel-by-voxel basis. We found that DTI tractography is capable of providing inter-regional connectivity comparable to the neuroanatomical connectivity, but is less reliable measuring voxel-to-voxel variations within regions.
1 Communities
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9 MeSH Terms
Targeted multiplex imaging mass spectrometry with single chain fragment variable (scfv) recombinant antibodies.
Thiery G, Mernaugh RL, Yan H, Spraggins JM, Yang J, Parl FF, Caprioli RM
(2012) J Am Soc Mass Spectrom 23: 1689-96
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antibodies, Monoclonal, Aryl Hydrocarbon Hydroxylases, Avidin, Biotin, Breast, Breast Neoplasms, Cytochrome P-450 CYP1A1, Cytochrome P-450 CYP1B1, Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay, Female, Histocytochemistry, Humans, Mass Spectrometry, Mice, Molecular Imaging, Rats, Recombinant Proteins, Sensitivity and Specificity, Single-Chain Antibodies
Show Abstract · Added March 7, 2014
Recombinant scfv antibodies specific for CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 P450 enzymes were combined with targeted imaging mass spectrometry to simultaneously detect the P450 enzymes present in archived, paraffin-embedded, human breast cancer tissue sections. By using CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 specific scfv, each coupled to a unique reporter molecule (i.e., a mass tag) it was possible to simultaneously detect multiple antigens within a single tissue sample with high sensitivity and specificity using mass spectrometry. The capability of imaging multiple antigens at the same time is a significant advance that overcomes technical barriers encountered when using present day approaches to develop assays that can simultaneously detect more than a single antigen in the same tissue sample.
1 Communities
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20 MeSH Terms
A flow cytometry-based dopamine transporter binding assay using antagonist-conjugated quantum dots.
Kovtun O, Ross EJ, Tomlinson ID, Rosenthal SJ
(2012) Chem Commun (Camb) 48: 5428-30
MeSH Terms: Binding, Competitive, Biotin, Dopamine, Dopamine Antagonists, Dopamine Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins, Flow Cytometry, Fluorescent Dyes, Gene Expression Regulation, HEK293 Cells, High-Throughput Screening Assays, Humans, Phorbol Esters, Piperazines, Polyethylene Glycols, Quantum Dots, Spectrometry, Fluorescence
Show Abstract · Added May 27, 2014
Here we present the development and validation of a flow cytometry-based dopamine transporter (DAT) binding assay that uses antagonist-conjugated quantum dots (QDs). We anticipate that our QD-based assay is of immediate value to the high throughput screening of novel DAT modulators.
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16 MeSH Terms
The sodium channel accessory subunit Navβ1 regulates neuronal excitability through modulation of repolarizing voltage-gated K⁺ channels.
Marionneau C, Carrasquillo Y, Norris AJ, Townsend RR, Isom LL, Link AJ, Nerbonne JM
(2012) J Neurosci 32: 5716-27
MeSH Terms: Analysis of Variance, Animals, Bacterial Proteins, Biophysics, Biotinylation, Cell Line, Transformed, Cerebral Cortex, Cycloheximide, Electric Stimulation, Endocytosis, Gene Expression Regulation, Green Fluorescent Proteins, Humans, Immunoprecipitation, Luminescent Proteins, Mass Spectrometry, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Neurons, Patch-Clamp Techniques, Protein Synthesis Inhibitors, Proteomics, RNA, Small Interfering, Receptors, Transferrin, Shal Potassium Channels, Sodium Channels, Transfection, Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel beta-1 Subunit
Show Abstract · Added February 20, 2015
The channel pore-forming α subunit Kv4.2 is a major constituent of A-type (I(A)) potassium currents and a key regulator of neuronal membrane excitability. Multiple mechanisms regulate the properties, subcellular targeting, and cell-surface expression of Kv4.2-encoded channels. In the present study, shotgun proteomic analyses of immunoprecipitated mouse brain Kv4.2 channel complexes unexpectedly identified the voltage-gated Na⁺ channel accessory subunit Navβ1. Voltage-clamp and current-clamp recordings revealed that knockdown of Navβ1 decreases I(A) densities in isolated cortical neurons and that action potential waveforms are prolonged and repetitive firing is increased in Scn1b-null cortical pyramidal neurons lacking Navβ1. Biochemical and voltage-clamp experiments further demonstrated that Navβ1 interacts with and increases the stability of the heterologously expressed Kv4.2 protein, resulting in greater total and cell-surface Kv4.2 protein expression and in larger Kv4.2-encoded current densities. Together, the results presented here identify Navβ1 as a component of native neuronal Kv4.2-encoded I(A) channel complexes and a novel regulator of I(A) channel densities and neuronal excitability.
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29 MeSH Terms
Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder-derived coding variation in the dopamine transporter disrupts microdomain targeting and trafficking regulation.
Sakrikar D, Mazei-Robison MS, Mergy MA, Richtand NW, Han Q, Hamilton PJ, Bowton E, Galli A, Veenstra-Vanderweele J, Gill M, Blakely RD
(2012) J Neurosci 32: 5385-97
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Amphetamine, Analysis of Variance, Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity, Bacterial Proteins, Benzylamines, Biotinylation, Calcium, Calcium-Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Type 2, Cell Line, Transformed, Child, Child, Preschool, Cholera Toxin, Cohort Studies, Dopamine, Dopamine Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins, Dopamine Uptake Inhibitors, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Electrochemistry, Female, Humans, Immunoprecipitation, Luminescent Proteins, Male, Membrane Microdomains, Membrane Proteins, Piperazines, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Protein Kinase Inhibitors, Protein Transport, Sulfonamides, Transfection, Tritium
Show Abstract · Added December 5, 2013
Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the most commonly diagnosed disorder of school-age children. Although genetic and brain-imaging studies suggest a contribution of altered dopamine (DA) signaling in ADHD, evidence of signaling perturbations contributing to risk is largely circumstantial. The presynaptic, cocaine- and amphetamine (AMPH)-sensitive DA transporter (DAT) constrains DA availability at presynaptic and postsynaptic receptors following vesicular release and is targeted by the most commonly prescribed ADHD therapeutics. Using polymorphism discovery approaches with an ADHD cohort, we identified a hDAT (human DAT) coding variant, R615C, located in the distal C terminus of the transporter, a region previously implicated in constitutive and regulated transporter trafficking. Here, we demonstrate that, whereas wild-type DAT proteins traffic in a highly regulated manner, DAT 615C proteins recycle constitutively and demonstrate insensitivity to the endocytic effects of AMPH and PKC (protein kinase C) activation. The disrupted regulation of DAT 615C parallels a redistribution of the transporter variant away from GM1 ganglioside- and flotillin1-enriched membranes, and is accompanied by altered CaMKII (calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II) and flotillin-1 interactions. Using C-terminal peptides derived from wild-type DAT and the R615C variant, we establish that the DAT 615C C terminus can act dominantly to preclude AMPH regulation of wild-type DAT. Mutagenesis of DAT C-terminal sequences suggests that phosphorylation of T613 may be important in sorting DAT between constitutive and regulated pathways. Together, our studies support a coupling of DAT microdomain localization with transporter regulation and provide evidence of perturbed DAT activity and DA signaling as a risk determinant for ADHD.
3 Communities
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33 MeSH Terms
Monitoring the spatiotemporal dynamics of proteins at replication forks and in assembled chromatin using isolation of proteins on nascent DNA.
Sirbu BM, Couch FB, Cortez D
(2012) Nat Protoc 7: 594-605
MeSH Terms: Biotin, Cells, Cultured, Chromatin Assembly and Disassembly, DNA, DNA Replication, Deoxyuridine, Molecular Structure, Proteins
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
Understanding the processes of DNA replication, chromatin assembly and maturation, and the replication stress response requires the ability to monitor protein dynamics at active and damaged replication forks. Detecting protein accumulation at replication forks or damaged sites has primarily relied on immunofluorescence imaging, which is limited in resolution and antibody sensitivity. Here we describe a procedure to isolate proteins on nascent DNA (iPOND) that permits a high-resolution spatiotemporal analysis of proteins at replication forks or on chromatin following DNA replication in cultured cells. iPOND relies on labeling of nascent DNA with the nucleoside analog 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU). Biotin conjugation to EdU-labeled DNA using click chemistry facilitates a single-step streptavidin purification of proteins bound to the nascent DNA. iPOND permits an interrogation of any cellular process linked to DNA synthesis using a 3- to 4-d protocol.
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8 MeSH Terms
The effects of nigrostriatal dopamine depletion on the thalamic parafascicular nucleus.
Kusnoor SV, Bubser M, Deutch AY
(2012) Brain Res 1446: 46-55
MeSH Terms: Animals, Biotin, Corpus Striatum, Desipramine, Dextrans, Dopamine, Dopamine beta-Hydroxylase, Enzyme Inhibitors, Fluoresceins, Intralaminar Thalamic Nuclei, Male, Medial Forebrain Bundle, Neurons, Oxidopamine, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Substantia Nigra, Sympatholytics, Tyrosine 3-Monooxygenase
Show Abstract · Added May 27, 2014
Neuronal loss in Parkinson's disease (PD) is seen in a number of brain regions in addition to the substantia nigra (SN). Among these is the thalamic parafascicular nucleus (PF), which sends glutamatergic projections to the striatum and receives GABAergic inputs from the SN. Recent data suggest that lesions of nigrostriatal dopamine axons cause a loss of PF neurons, which has been interpreted to suggest that the PF cell loss seen in PD is secondary to dopamine denervation. However, the extent of a PF dopamine innervation in the rat is unclear, and it is possible that PF cell loss in parkinsonism is independent of nigrostriatal dopamine degeneration. We characterized the dopamine innervation of the PF in the rat and determined if 6-hydroxydopamine SN lesions cause PF neuron degeneration. Dual-label immunohistochemistry revealed that almost all tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive (TH-ir) axons in the PF also expressed dopamine-beta-hydroxylase and were therefore noradrenergic or adrenergic. Moreover, an antibody directed against dopamine revealed only very rare PF dopaminergic axons. Retrograde-tract tracing-immunohistochemistry did not uncover an innervation of the PF from midbrain dopamine neurons. Nigrostriatal dopamine neuron lesions did not elicit degeneration of PF cells, as reflected by a lack of FluoroJade C staining. Similarly, neither unilateral 6-OHDA lesions of nigrostriatal axons nor the dorsal noradrenergic bundle decreased the number of PF neurons or the number of PF neurons retrogradely-labeled from the striatum. These data suggest that the loss of thalamostriatal PF neurons in Parkinson's Disease is a primary event rather than secondary to nigrostriatal dopamine degeneration.
Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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19 MeSH Terms
Biotinylated probes for the analysis of protein modification by electrophiles.
Codreanu SG, Kim HY, Porter NA, Liebler DC
(2012) Methods Mol Biol 803: 77-95
MeSH Terms: Aldehydes, Amino Acid Sequence, Biochemistry, Biotin, Biotinylation, Blood Proteins, Blotting, Western, Cell Extracts, Cell Line, Tumor, Databases, Protein, Humans, Immunoblotting, Indicators and Reagents, Mass Spectrometry, Molecular Probes, Molecular Sequence Data, Peptides, Protein Processing, Post-Translational, Proteins, Streptavidin, Trypsin
Show Abstract · Added March 7, 2014
Formation of covalent protein adducts by lipid electrophiles contributes to diseases and toxicities linked to oxidative stress, but analysis of the adducts presents a challenging analytical problem. We describe selective adduct capture using biotin affinity probes to enrich protein and peptide adducts for analysis by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). One approach employs biotinamidohexanoic acid hydrazide to covalently label residual carbonyl groups on adducts. The other employs alkynyl analogs of lipid electrophiles, which form adducts that can be postlabeled with azidobiotin tags by Cu(+)-catalyzed cycloaddition (Click chemistry). To enhance the selectivity of adduct capture, we use an azidobiotin reagent with a photocleavable linker, which allows recovery of adducted proteins and peptides under mild conditions. This approach allows both the identification of protein targets of lipid electrophiles and sequence mapping of the adducts.
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21 MeSH Terms