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Wing-pitching mechanism of hovering Ruby-throated hummingbirds.
Song J, Luo H, Hedrick TL
(2015) Bioinspir Biomim 10: 016007
MeSH Terms: Acceleration, Animals, Biological Clocks, Birds, Computer Simulation, Flight, Animal, Models, Biological, Oscillometry, Rheology, Wings, Animal
Show Abstract · Added February 12, 2015
In hovering flight, hummingbirds reverse the angle of attack of their wings through pitch reversal in order to generate aerodynamic lift during both downstroke and upstroke. In addition, the wings may pitch during translation to further enhance lift production. It is not yet clear whether these pitching motions are caused by the wing inertia or actuated through the musculoskeletal system. Here we perform a computational analysis of the pitching dynamics by incorporating the realistic wing kinematics to determine the inertial effects. The aerodynamic effect is also included using the pressure data from a previous three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulation of a hovering hummingbird. The results show that like many insects, pitch reversal of the hummingbird is, to a large degree, caused by the wing inertia. However, actuation power input at the root is needed in the beginning of pronation to initiate a fast pitch reversal and also in mid-downstroke to enable a nose-up pitching motion for lift enhancement. The muscles on the wing may not necessarily be activated for pitching of the distal section. Finally, power analysis of the flapping motion shows that there is no requirement for substantial elastic energy storage or energy absorption at the shoulder joint.
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2 Members
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10 MeSH Terms
Beta oscillation dynamics in extrastriate cortex after removal of primary visual cortex.
Schmiedt JT, Maier A, Fries P, Saunders RC, Leopold DA, Schmid MC
(2014) J Neurosci 34: 11857-64
MeSH Terms: Animals, Biological Clocks, Electroencephalography, Evoked Potentials, Visual, Female, Macaca mulatta, Photic Stimulation, Visual Cortex, Visual Pathways
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
The local field potential (LFP) in visual cortex is typically characterized by the following spectral pattern: before the onset of a visual stimulus, low-frequency oscillations (beta, 12-20 Hz) dominate, whereas during the presentation of a stimulus these oscillations diminish and are replaced by fluctuations at higher frequencies (gamma, >30 Hz). The origin of beta oscillations in vivo remains unclear, as is the basis of their suppression during visual stimulation. Here we investigate the contribution of ascending input from primary visual cortex (V1) to beta oscillation dynamics in extrastriate visual area V4 of behaving monkeys. We recorded LFP activity in V4 before and after resecting a portion of V1. After the surgery, the visually induced gamma LFP activity in the lesion projection zone of V4 was markedly reduced, consistent with previously reported spiking responses (Schmid et al., 2013). In the beta LFP range, the lesion had minimal effect on the normal pattern of spontaneous oscillations. However, the lesion led to a surprising and permanent reversal of the normal beta suppression during visual stimulation, with visual stimuli eliciting beta magnitude increases up to 50%, particularly in response to moving stimuli. This reversed beta activity pattern was specific to stimulus locations affected by the V1 lesion. Our results shed light on the mechanisms of beta activity in extrastriate visual cortex: The preserved spontaneous oscillations point to a generation mechanism independent of the geniculostriate pathway, whereas the positive beta responses support the contribution of visual information to V4 via direct thalamo-extrastriate projections.
Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3411857-08$15.00/0.
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9 MeSH Terms
Developmental changes in postnatal murine intestinal interstitial cell of Cajal network structure and function.
Gao J, Sathar S, O'Grady G, Han J, Cheng LK
(2014) Ann Biomed Eng 42: 1729-39
MeSH Terms: Aging, Animals, Biological Clocks, Interstitial Cells of Cajal, Mice, Inbred BALB C
Show Abstract · Added April 26, 2016
The mammalian gastrointestinal (GI) tract undergoes rapid development during early postnatal life in order to transition from a milk to solid diet. Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are the pacemaker cells that coordinate smooth muscle contractility within the GI tract, and hence we hypothesized that ICC networks undergo significant developmental changes during this early postnatal period. Numerical metrics for quantifying ICC network structural properties were applied on confocal ICC network imaging data obtained from the murine small intestine at various postnatal ages spanning birth to weaning. These imaging data were also coupled to a biophysically-based computational model to simulate pacemaker activity in the networks, to quantify how changes in structure may alter function. The results showed a pruning-like mechanism which occurs during postnatal development, and the temporal course of this phenomenon was defined. There was an initial ICC process overgrowth to optimize network efficiency and increase functional output volume. This was followed by a selective retaining and strengthening of processes, while others were discarded to further elevate functional output volume. Subsequently, new ICC processes were formed and the network was adjusted to its adult morphology. These postnatal ICC network developmental events may be critical in facilitating mature digestive function.
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1 Members
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5 MeSH Terms
Mitochondrial calcium handling within the interstitial cells of Cajal.
Means SA, Cheng LK
(2014) Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 307: G107-21
MeSH Terms: Animals, Biological Clocks, Calcium, Calcium Signaling, Computer Simulation, Endoplasmic Reticulum, Humans, Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptors, Interstitial Cells of Cajal, Membrane Potentials, Mitochondria, Models, Biological, Periodicity, Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Calcium-Transporting ATPases, Time Factors
Show Abstract · Added April 26, 2016
The interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) drive rhythmic pacemaking contractions in the gastrointestinal system. The ICC generate pacemaking signals by membrane depolarizations associated with the release of intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) through inositol-trisphosphate (IP3) receptors (IP3R) and uptake by mitochondria (MT). This Ca(2+) dynamic is hypothesized to generate pacemaking signals by calibrating ER Ca(2+) store depletions and membrane depolarization with ER store-operated Ca(2+) entry mechanisms. Using a biophysically based spatio-temporal model of integrated Ca(2+) transport in the ICC, we determined the feasibility of ER depletion timescale correspondence with experimentally observed pacemaking frequencies while considering the impact of IP3R Ca(2+) release and MT uptake on bulk cytosolic Ca(2+) levels because persistent elevations of free intracellular Ca(2+) are toxic to the cell. MT densities and distributions are varied in the model geometry to observe MT influence on free cytosolic Ca(2+) and the resulting frequencies of ER Ca(2+) store depletions, as well as the sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATP-ase (SERCA) and IP3 agonist concentrations. Our simulations show that high MT densities observed in the ICC are more relevant to ER establishing Ca(2+) depletion frequencies than protection of the cytosol from elevated free Ca(2+), whereas the SERCA pump is more relevant to containing cytosolic Ca(2+) elevations. Our results further suggest that the level of IP3 agonist stimulating ER Ca(2+) release, subsequent MT uptake, and eventual activation of ER store-operated Ca(2+) entry may determine frequencies of rhythmic pacemaking exhibited by the ICC across species and tissue types.
Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.
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15 MeSH Terms
Generation of myometrium-specific Bmal1 knockout mice for parturition analysis.
Ratajczak CK, Asada M, Allen GC, McMahon DG, Muglia LM, Smith D, Bhattacharyya S, Muglia LJ
(2012) Reprod Fertil Dev 24: 759-67
MeSH Terms: ARNTL Transcription Factors, Animals, Biological Clocks, Female, Gene Transfer Techniques, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Myometrium, Organ Specificity, Parturition, Pregnancy, Time Factors
Show Abstract · Added April 17, 2013
Human and rodent studies indicate a role for circadian rhythmicity and associated clock gene expression in supporting normal parturition. The importance of clock gene expression in tissues besides the suprachiasmatic nucleus is emerging. Here, a Bmal1 conditional knockout mouse line and a novel Cre transgenic mouse line were used to examine the role of myometrial Bmal1 in parturition. Ninety-two percent (22/24) of control females but only 64% (14/22) of females with disrupted myometrial Bmal1 completed parturition during the expected time window of 5p.m. on Day 19 through to 9a.m. on Day 19.5 of gestation. However, neither serum progesterone levels nor uterine transcript expression of the contractile-associated proteins Connexin43 and Oxytocin receptor differed between females with disrupted myometrial Bmal1 and controls during late gestation. The data indicate a role for myometrial Bmal1 in maintaining normal time of day of parturition.
1 Communities
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14 MeSH Terms
Abnormal initiation and conduction of slow-wave activity in gastroparesis, defined by high-resolution electrical mapping.
O'Grady G, Angeli TR, Du P, Lahr C, Lammers WJEP, Windsor JA, Abell TL, Farrugia G, Pullan AJ, Cheng LK
(2012) Gastroenterology 143: 589-598.e3
MeSH Terms: Adult, Biological Clocks, Biopsy, Electric Stimulation Therapy, Electrodiagnosis, Female, Gastric Emptying, Gastroparesis, Humans, Interstitial Cells of Cajal, Male, Membrane Potentials, Middle Aged, Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted, Time Factors
Show Abstract · Added April 26, 2016
BACKGROUND & AIMS - Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) generate slow waves. Disrupted ICC networks and gastric dysrhythmias are each associated with gastroparesis. However, there are no data on the initiation and propagation of slow waves in gastroparesis because research tools have lacked spatial resolution. We applied high-resolution electrical mapping to quantify and classify gastroparesis slow-wave abnormalities in spatiotemporal detail.
METHODS - Serosal high-resolution mapping was performed using flexible arrays (256 electrodes; 36 cm(2)) at stimulator implantation in 12 patients with diabetic or idiopathic gastroparesis. Data were analyzed by isochronal mapping, velocity and amplitude field mapping, and propagation animation. ICC numbers were determined from gastric biopsy specimens.
RESULTS - Mean ICC counts were reduced in patients with gastroparesis (2.3 vs 5.4 bodies/field; P < .001). Slow-wave abnormalities were detected by high-resolution mapping in 11 of 12 patients. Several new patterns were observed and classified as abnormal initiation (10/12; stable ectopic pacemakers or diffuse focal events; median, 3.3 cycles/min; range, 2.1-5.7 cycles/min) or abnormal conduction (7/10; reduced velocities or conduction blocks; median, 2.9 cycles/min; range, 2.1-3.6 cycles/min). Circumferential conduction emerged during aberrant initiation or incomplete block and was associated with velocity elevation (7.3 vs 2.9 mm s(-1); P = .002) and increased amplitudes beyond a low base value (415 vs 170 μV; P = .002).
CONCLUSIONS - High-resolution mapping revealed new categories of abnormal human slow-wave activity. Abnormalities of slow-wave initiation and conduction occur in gastroparesis, often at normal frequency, which could be missed by tests that lack spatial resolution. Irregular initiation, aberrant conduction, and low amplitude activity could contribute to the pathogenesis of gastroparesis.
Copyright © 2012 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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15 MeSH Terms
The analysis of human gastric pacemaker activity.
O'Grady G, Pullan AJ, Cheng LK
(2012) J Physiol 590: 1299-300; author reply 1301-2
MeSH Terms: Biological Clocks, Female, Humans, Male, Muscle, Smooth, Stomach
Added April 26, 2016
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6 MeSH Terms
The cyanobacterial circadian system: from biophysics to bioevolution.
Johnson CH, Stewart PL, Egli M
(2011) Annu Rev Biophys 40: 143-67
MeSH Terms: Bacterial Proteins, Biological Clocks, Circadian Rhythm, Computer Simulation, Cyanobacteria, Evolution, Molecular, Models, Biological
Show Abstract · Added March 7, 2014
Recent studies have unveiled the molecular machinery responsible for the biological clock in cyanobacteria and found that it exerts pervasive control over cellular processes including global gene expression. Indeed, the entire chromosome undergoes daily cycles of topology/compaction! The circadian system comprises both a posttranslational oscillator (PTO) and a transcriptional/translational feedback loop (TTFL). The PTO can be reconstituted in vitro with three purified proteins (KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC) and ATP. These are the only circadian proteins for which high-resolution structures are available. Phase in this nanoclockwork has been associated with key phosphorylations of KaiC. Structural considerations illuminate the mechanism by which the KaiABC oscillator ratchets unidirectionally. Models of the complete in vivo system have important implications for our understanding of circadian clocks in higher organisms, including mammals. The conjunction of structural, biophysical, and biochemical approaches to this system has brought our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of biological timekeeping to an unprecedented level.
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2 Members
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7 MeSH Terms
Multiscale modeling of gastrointestinal electrophysiology and experimental validation.
Du P, O'Grady G, Davidson JB, Cheng LK, Pullan AJ
(2010) Crit Rev Biomed Eng 38: 225-54
MeSH Terms: Animals, Biological Clocks, Computer Simulation, Electromyography, Electrophysiology, Gastrointestinal Tract, Humans, Interstitial Cells of Cajal, Models, Biological, Muscle Contraction, Muscle, Smooth, Myoelectric Complex, Migrating
Show Abstract · Added April 26, 2016
Normal gastrointestinal (GI) motility results from the coordinated interplay of multiple cooperating mechanisms, both intrinsic and extrinsic to the GI tract. A fundamental component of this activity is an omnipresent electrical activity termed slow waves, which is generated and propagated by the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs). The role of ICC loss and network degradation in GI motility disorders is a significant area of ongoing research. This review examines recent progress in the multiscale modeling framework for effectively integrating a vast range of experimental data in GI electrophysiology, and outlines the prospect of how modeling can provide new insights into GI function in health and disease. The review begins with an overview of the GI tract and its electrophysiology, and then focuses on recent work on modeling GI electrical activity, spanning from cell to body biophysical scales. Mathematical cell models of the ICCs and smooth muscle cell are presented. The continuum framework of monodomain and bidomain models for tissue and organ models are then considered, and the forward techniques used to model the resultant body surface potential and magnetic field are discussed. The review then outlines recent progress in experimental support and validation of modeling, and concludes with a discussion on potential future research directions in this field.
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1 Members
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12 MeSH Terms
Ionic mechanisms of pacemaker activity in spontaneously contracting atrial HL-1 cells.
Yang Z, Murray KT
(2011) J Cardiovasc Pharmacol 57: 28-36
MeSH Terms: Action Potentials, Biological Clocks, Calcium, Cell Line, Transformed, Diastole, Heart Atria, Humans, Ions, Myocytes, Cardiac, Ryanodine, Sarcolemma, Sarcoplasmic Reticulum, Sinoatrial Node, Thapsigargin
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
Although normally absent, spontaneous pacemaker activity can develop in human atrium to promote tachyarrhythmias. HL-1 cells are immortalized atrial cardiomyocytes that contract spontaneously in culture, providing a model system of atrial cell automaticity. Using electrophysiologic recordings and selective pharmacologic blockers, we investigated the ionic basis of automaticity in atrial HL-1 cells. Both the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca release channel inhibitor ryanodine and the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin slowed automaticity, supporting a role for intracellular Ca release in pacemaker activity. Additional experiments were performed to examine the effects of ionic currents activating in the voltage range of diastolic depolarization. Inhibition of the hyperpolarization-activated pacemaker current, If, by ivabradine significantly suppressed diastolic depolarization, with modest slowing of automaticity. Block of inward Na currents also reduced automaticity, whereas inhibition of T- and L-type Ca currents caused milder effects to slow beat rate. The major outward current in HL-1 cells is the rapidly activating delayed rectifier, IKr. Inhibition of IKr using dofetilide caused marked prolongation of action potential duration and thus spontaneous cycle length. These results demonstrate a mutual role for both intracellular Ca release and sarcolemmal ionic currents in controlling automaticity in atrial HL-1 cells. Given that similar internal and membrane-based mechanisms also play a role in sinoatrial nodal cell pacemaker activity, our findings provide evidence for generalized conservation of pacemaker mechanisms among different types of cardiomyocytes.
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14 MeSH Terms