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Functional and structural similarity of human DNA primase [4Fe4S] cluster domain constructs.
Holt ME, Salay LE, O'Brien E, Barton JK, Chazin WJ
(2018) PLoS One 13: e0209345
MeSH Terms: Binding Sites, Circular Dichroism, Crystallography, X-Ray, DNA, DNA Primase, Molecular Docking Simulation, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Biomolecular, Oxidation-Reduction, Protein Binding, Protein Domains, Protein Structure, Secondary, RNA
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
The regulatory subunit of human DNA primase has a C-terminal domain (p58C) that contains a [4Fe4S] cluster and binds DNA. Previous electrochemical analysis of a p58C construct revealed that its affinity for DNA is sensitive to the redox state of the [4Fe4S] cluster. Concerns about the validity of this conclusion have been raised, based in part on differences in X-ray crystal structures of the p58C272-464 construct used for that study and that of a N-terminally shifted p58C266-456 construct and consequently, an assumption that p58C272-464 has abnormal physical and functional properties. To address this controversy, a new p58C266-464 construct containing all residues was crystallized under the conditions previously used for crystallizing p58C272-464, and the solution structures of both constructs were assessed using circular dichroism and NMR spectroscopy. In the new crystal structure, p58C266-464 exhibits the same elements of secondary structure near the DNA binding site as observed in the crystal structure of p58C272-464. Moreover, in solution, circular dichroism and 15N,1H-heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) NMR spectra show there are no significant differences in the distribution of secondary structures or in the tertiary structure or the two constructs. To validate that the two constructs have the same functional properties, binding of a primed DNA template was measured using a fluorescence-based DNA binding assay, and the affinities for this substrate were the same (3.4 ± 0.5 μM and 2.7 ± 0.3 μM, respectively). The electrochemical properties of p58C266-464 were also measured and this p58C construct was able to engage in redox switching on DNA with the same efficiency as p58C272-464. Together, these results show that although p58C can be stabilized in different conformations in the crystalline state, in solution there is effectively no difference in the structure and functional properties of p58C constructs of different lengths.
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12 MeSH Terms
Broadly Neutralizing Antibody Mediated Clearance of Human Hepatitis C Virus Infection.
Kinchen VJ, Zahid MN, Flyak AI, Soliman MG, Learn GH, Wang S, Davidson E, Doranz BJ, Ray SC, Cox AL, Crowe JE, Bjorkman PJ, Shaw GM, Bailey JR
(2018) Cell Host Microbe 24: 717-730.e5
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antibodies, Monoclonal, Antibodies, Neutralizing, Antibody Specificity, Base Sequence, Binding Sites, Cell Line, Cricetulus, Epitopes, Female, HEK293 Cells, HIV-1, Hepacivirus, Hepatitis C, Hepatitis C Antibodies, Humans, Immunologic Memory, Male, Models, Molecular, Mutagenesis, Site-Directed, Viral Envelope Proteins, Viral Load
Show Abstract · Added March 31, 2019
The role that broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) play in natural clearance of human hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Here, we investigate the mechanism by which bNAbs, isolated from two humans who spontaneously cleared HCV infection, contribute to HCV control. Using viral gene sequences amplified from longitudinal plasma of the two subjects, we found that these bNAbs, which target the front layer of the HCV envelope protein E2, neutralized most autologous HCV strains. Acquisition of resistance to bNAbs by some autologous strains was accompanied by progressive loss of E2 protein function, and temporally associated with HCV clearance. These data demonstrate that bNAbs can mediate clearance of human HCV infection by neutralizing infecting strains and driving escaped viruses to an unfit state. These immunopathologic events distinguish HCV from HIV-1 and suggest that development of an HCV vaccine may be achievable.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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22 MeSH Terms
HCV Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies Use a CDRH3 Disulfide Motif to Recognize an E2 Glycoprotein Site that Can Be Targeted for Vaccine Design.
Flyak AI, Ruiz S, Colbert MD, Luong T, Crowe JE, Bailey JR, Bjorkman PJ
(2018) Cell Host Microbe 24: 703-716.e3
MeSH Terms: Antibodies, Neutralizing, Antibodies, Viral, Binding Sites, Disulfides, Drug Design, Epitopes, Hepacivirus, Hepatitis C, Hepatitis C Antibodies, Humans, Immunoglobulin G, Models, Molecular, Protein Conformation, Sequence Alignment, Viral Envelope Proteins, Viral Hepatitis Vaccines, X-Ray Diffraction
Show Abstract · Added March 31, 2019
Hepatitis C virus (HCV) vaccine efforts are hampered by the extensive genetic diversity of HCV envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2. Structures of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) (e.g., HEPC3, HEPC74) isolated from individuals who spontaneously cleared HCV infection facilitate immunogen design to elicit antibodies against multiple HCV variants. However, challenges in expressing HCV glycoproteins previously limited bNAb-HCV structures to complexes with truncated E2 cores. Here we describe crystal structures of full-length E2 ectodomain complexes with HEPC3 and HEPC74, revealing lock-and-key antibody-antigen interactions, E2 regions (including a target of immunogen design) that were truncated or disordered in E2 cores, and an antibody CDRH3 disulfide motif that exhibits common interactions with a conserved epitope despite different bNAb-E2 binding orientations. The structures display unusual features relevant to common genetic signatures of HCV bNAbs and demonstrate extraordinary plasticity in antibody-antigen interactions. In addition, E2 variants that bind HEPC3/HEPC74-like germline precursors may represent candidate vaccine immunogens.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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17 MeSH Terms
Discovery, Characterization, and Effects on Renal Fluid and Electrolyte Excretion of the Kir4.1 Potassium Channel Pore Blocker, VU0134992.
Kharade SV, Kurata H, Bender AM, Blobaum AL, Figueroa EE, Duran A, Kramer M, Days E, Vinson P, Flores D, Satlin LM, Meiler J, Weaver CD, Lindsley CW, Hopkins CR, Denton JS
(2018) Mol Pharmacol 94: 926-937
MeSH Terms: Animals, Binding Sites, Diuretics, Electrolytes, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Male, Models, Molecular, Molecular Docking Simulation, Molecular Structure, Mutagenesis, Site-Directed, Potassium Channels, Inwardly Rectifying, Rats, Small Molecule Libraries, Substrate Specificity
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2019
The inward rectifier potassium (Kir) channel Kir4.1 () carries out important physiologic roles in epithelial cells of the kidney, astrocytes in the central nervous system, and stria vascularis of the inner ear. Loss-of-function mutations in lead to EAST/SeSAME syndrome, which is characterized by epilepsy, ataxia, renal salt wasting, and sensorineural deafness. Although genetic approaches have been indispensable for establishing the importance of Kir4.1 in the normal function of these tissues, the availability of pharmacological tools for acutely manipulating the activity of Kir4.1 in genetically normal animals has been lacking. We therefore carried out a high-throughput screen of 76,575 compounds from the Vanderbilt Institute of Chemical Biology library for small-molecule modulators of Kir4.1. The most potent inhibitor identified was 2-(2-bromo-4-isopropylphenoxy)--(2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-4-yl)acetamide (VU0134992). In whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology experiments, VU0134992 inhibits Kir4.1 with an IC value of 0.97 M and is 9-fold selective for homomeric Kir4.1 over Kir4.1/5.1 concatemeric channels (IC = 9 M) at -120 mV. In thallium (Tl) flux assays, VU0134992 is greater than 30-fold selective for Kir4.1 over Kir1.1, Kir2.1, and Kir2.2; is weakly active toward Kir2.3, Kir6.2/SUR1, and Kir7.1; and is equally active toward Kir3.1/3.2, Kir3.1/3.4, and Kir4.2. This potency and selectivity profile is superior to Kir4.1 inhibitors amitriptyline, nortriptyline, and fluoxetine. Medicinal chemistry identified components of VU0134992 that are critical for inhibiting Kir4.1. Patch-clamp electrophysiology, molecular modeling, and site-directed mutagenesis identified pore-lining glutamate 158 and isoleucine 159 as critical residues for block of the channel. VU0134992 displayed a large free unbound fraction () in rat plasma ( = 0.213). Consistent with the known role of Kir4.1 in renal function, oral dosing of VU0134992 led to a dose-dependent diuresis, natriuresis, and kaliuresis in rats. Thus, VU0134992 represents the first in vivo active tool compound for probing the therapeutic potential of Kir4.1 as a novel diuretic target for the treatment of hypertension.
Copyright © 2018 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.
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MeSH Terms
A Mechanism of Calmodulin Modulation of the Human Cardiac Sodium Channel.
Johnson CN, Potet F, Thompson MK, Kroncke BM, Glazer AM, Voehler MW, Knollmann BC, George AL, Chazin WJ
(2018) Structure 26: 683-694.e3
MeSH Terms: Binding Sites, Calcium, Calmodulin, Crystallography, X-Ray, Gene Expression Regulation, Humans, Kinetics, Models, Molecular, Mutation, NAV1.5 Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel, Protein Binding
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
The function of the human cardiac sodium channel (Na1.5) is modulated by the Ca sensor calmodulin (CaM), but the underlying mechanism(s) are controversial and poorly defined. CaM has been reported to bind in a Ca-dependent manner to two sites in the intracellular loop that is critical for inactivation of Na1.5 (inactivation gate [IG]). The affinity of CaM for the complete IG was significantly stronger than that of fragments that lacked both complete binding sites. Structural analysis by nuclear magnetic resonance, crystallographic, and scattering approaches revealed that CaM simultaneously engages both IG sites using an extended configuration. Patch-clamp recordings for wild-type and mutant channels with an impaired CaM-IG interaction revealed CaM binding to the IG promotes recovery from inactivation while impeding the kinetics of inactivation. Models of full-length Na1.5 suggest that CaM binding to the IG directly modulates channel function by destabilizing the inactivated state, which would promote resetting of the IG after channels close.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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MeSH Terms
Integrated Structural Biology for α-Helical Membrane Protein Structure Determination.
Xia Y, Fischer AW, Teixeira P, Weiner B, Meiler J
(2018) Structure 26: 657-666.e2
MeSH Terms: Algorithms, Binding Sites, Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy, Humans, Membrane Proteins, Microscopy, Electron, Models, Molecular, Monte Carlo Method, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Biomolecular, Protein Binding, Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical, Protein Folding, Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs, Rhodopsin, Thermodynamics
Show Abstract · Added March 17, 2018
While great progress has been made, only 10% of the nearly 1,000 integral, α-helical, multi-span membrane protein families are represented by at least one experimentally determined structure in the PDB. Previously, we developed the algorithm BCL::MP-Fold, which samples the large conformational space of membrane proteins de novo by assembling predicted secondary structure elements guided by knowledge-based potentials. Here, we present a case study of rhodopsin fold determination by integrating sparse and/or low-resolution restraints from multiple experimental techniques including electron microscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Simultaneous incorporation of orthogonal experimental restraints not only significantly improved the sampling accuracy but also allowed identification of the correct fold, which is demonstrated by a protein size-normalized transmembrane root-mean-square deviation as low as 1.2 Å. The protocol developed in this case study can be used for the determination of unknown membrane protein folds when limited experimental restraints are available.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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15 MeSH Terms
The Marburgvirus-Neutralizing Human Monoclonal Antibody MR191 Targets a Conserved Site to Block Virus Receptor Binding.
King LB, Fusco ML, Flyak AI, Ilinykh PA, Huang K, Gunn B, Kirchdoerfer RN, Hastie KM, Sangha AK, Meiler J, Alter G, Bukreyev A, Crowe JE, Saphire EO
(2018) Cell Host Microbe 23: 101-109.e4
MeSH Terms: Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Animals, Antibodies, Monoclonal, Antibodies, Neutralizing, Antibodies, Viral, Binding Sites, Carrier Proteins, Cell Line, Cercopithecus aethiops, Crystallography, X-Ray, Drosophila melanogaster, Humans, Marburgvirus, Membrane Glycoproteins, Receptors, Virus, Tobacco, Vero Cells, Viral Envelope Proteins, Viral Fusion Proteins, Virus Attachment
Show Abstract · Added March 17, 2018
Since their first identification 50 years ago, marburgviruses have emerged several times, with 83%-90% lethality in the largest outbreaks. Although no vaccines or therapeutics are available for human use, the human antibody MR191 provides complete protection in non-human primates when delivered several days after inoculation of a lethal marburgvirus dose. The detailed neutralization mechanism of MR191 remains outstanding. Here we present a 3.2 Å crystal structure of MR191 complexed with a trimeric marburgvirus surface glycoprotein (GP). MR191 neutralizes by occupying the conserved receptor-binding site and competing with the host receptor Niemann-Pick C1. The structure illuminates previously disordered regions of GP including the stalk, fusion loop, CXCC switch, and an N-terminal region of GP2 that wraps about the outside of GP1 to anchor a marburgvirus-specific "wing" antibody epitope. Virus escape mutations mapped far outside the MR191 receptor-binding site footprint suggest a role for these other regions in the GP quaternary structure.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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20 MeSH Terms
Role of Non-local Interactions between CDR Loops in Binding Affinity of MR78 Antibody to Marburg Virus Glycoprotein.
Sangha AK, Dong J, Williamson L, Hashiguchi T, Saphire EO, Crowe JE, Meiler J
(2017) Structure 25: 1820-1828.e2
MeSH Terms: Antibodies, Monoclonal, Antibodies, Neutralizing, Antibody Affinity, Binding Sites, Antibody, Molecular Docking Simulation, Protein Binding, Viral Envelope Proteins
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
An atomic-detail model of the Marburg virus glycoprotein in complex with a neutralizing human monoclonal antibody designated MR78 was constructed using Phenix.Rosetta starting from a 3.6Å crystallographic density map. The Asp at T6 in the HCDR3's bulged torso cannot form the canonical salt bridge as position T2 lacks an Arg or Lys residue. It instead engages in a hydrogen bond interaction with a Tyr contributed by the HCDR1 loop. This inter-CDR loop interaction stabilizes the bulged conformation needed for binding to the viral glycoprotein: a Tyr to Phe mutant displays a binding affinity reduced by a factor of at least 10. We found that 5% of a database of 465 million human antibody sequences has the same residues at T2 and T6 positions in HCDR3 and Tyr in HCDR1 that could potentially form this Asp-Tyr interaction, and that this interaction might contribute to a non-canonical bulged torso conformation.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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7 MeSH Terms
Structural basis of arrestin-3 activation and signaling.
Chen Q, Perry NA, Vishnivetskiy SA, Berndt S, Gilbert NC, Zhuo Y, Singh PK, Tholen J, Ohi MD, Gurevich EV, Brautigam CA, Klug CS, Gurevich VV, Iverson TM
(2017) Nat Commun 8: 1427
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Animals, Arrestins, Binding Sites, Cattle, Crystallography, X-Ray, Humans, Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 10, Models, Molecular, Phytic Acid, Protein Conformation, Protein Structure, Quaternary, Recombinant Proteins, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
A unique aspect of arrestin-3 is its ability to support both receptor-dependent and receptor-independent signaling. Here, we show that inositol hexakisphosphate (IP) is a non-receptor activator of arrestin-3 and report the structure of IP-activated arrestin-3 at 2.4-Å resolution. IP-activated arrestin-3 exhibits an inter-domain twist and a displaced C-tail, hallmarks of active arrestin. IP binds to the arrestin phosphate sensor, and is stabilized by trimerization. Analysis of the trimerization surface, which is also the receptor-binding surface, suggests a feature called the finger loop as a key region of the activation sensor. We show that finger loop helicity and flexibility may underlie coupling to hundreds of diverse receptors and also promote arrestin-3 activation by IP. Importantly, we show that effector-binding sites on arrestins have distinct conformations in the basal and activated states, acting as switch regions. These switch regions may work with the inter-domain twist to initiate and direct arrestin-mediated signaling.
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14 MeSH Terms
Association analysis identifies 65 new breast cancer risk loci.
Michailidou K, Lindström S, Dennis J, Beesley J, Hui S, Kar S, Lemaçon A, Soucy P, Glubb D, Rostamianfar A, Bolla MK, Wang Q, Tyrer J, Dicks E, Lee A, Wang Z, Allen J, Keeman R, Eilber U, French JD, Qing Chen X, Fachal L, McCue K, McCart Reed AE, Ghoussaini M, Carroll JS, Jiang X, Finucane H, Adams M, Adank MA, Ahsan H, Aittomäki K, Anton-Culver H, Antonenkova NN, Arndt V, Aronson KJ, Arun B, Auer PL, Bacot F, Barrdahl M, Baynes C, Beckmann MW, Behrens S, Benitez J, Bermisheva M, Bernstein L, Blomqvist C, Bogdanova NV, Bojesen SE, Bonanni B, Børresen-Dale AL, Brand JS, Brauch H, Brennan P, Brenner H, Brinton L, Broberg P, Brock IW, Broeks A, Brooks-Wilson A, Brucker SY, Brüning T, Burwinkel B, Butterbach K, Cai Q, Cai H, Caldés T, Canzian F, Carracedo A, Carter BD, Castelao JE, Chan TL, David Cheng TY, Seng Chia K, Choi JY, Christiansen H, Clarke CL, NBCS Collaborators, Collée M, Conroy DM, Cordina-Duverger E, Cornelissen S, Cox DG, Cox A, Cross SS, Cunningham JM, Czene K, Daly MB, Devilee P, Doheny KF, Dörk T, Dos-Santos-Silva I, Dumont M, Durcan L, Dwek M, Eccles DM, Ekici AB, Eliassen AH, Ellberg C, Elvira M, Engel C, Eriksson M, Fasching PA, Figueroa J, Flesch-Janys D, Fletcher O, Flyger H, Fritschi L, Gaborieau V, Gabrielson M, Gago-Dominguez M, Gao YT, Gapstur SM, García-Sáenz JA, Gaudet MM, Georgoulias V, Giles GG, Glendon G, Goldberg MS, Goldgar DE, González-Neira A, Grenaker Alnæs GI, Grip M, Gronwald J, Grundy A, Guénel P, Haeberle L, Hahnen E, Haiman CA, Håkansson N, Hamann U, Hamel N, Hankinson S, Harrington P, Hart SN, Hartikainen JM, Hartman M, Hein A, Heyworth J, Hicks B, Hillemanns P, Ho DN, Hollestelle A, Hooning MJ, Hoover RN, Hopper JL, Hou MF, Hsiung CN, Huang G, Humphreys K, Ishiguro J, Ito H, Iwasaki M, Iwata H, Jakubowska A, Janni W, John EM, Johnson N, Jones K, Jones M, Jukkola-Vuorinen A, Kaaks R, Kabisch M, Kaczmarek K, Kang D, Kasuga Y, Kerin MJ, Khan S, Khusnutdinova E, Kiiski JI, Kim SW, Knight JA, Kosma VM, Kristensen VN, Krüger U, Kwong A, Lambrechts D, Le Marchand L, Lee E, Lee MH, Lee JW, Neng Lee C, Lejbkowicz F, Li J, Lilyquist J, Lindblom A, Lissowska J, Lo WY, Loibl S, Long J, Lophatananon A, Lubinski J, Luccarini C, Lux MP, Ma ESK, MacInnis RJ, Maishman T, Makalic E, Malone KE, Kostovska IM, Mannermaa A, Manoukian S, Manson JE, Margolin S, Mariapun S, Martinez ME, Matsuo K, Mavroudis D, McKay J, McLean C, Meijers-Heijboer H, Meindl A, Menéndez P, Menon U, Meyer J, Miao H, Miller N, Taib NAM, Muir K, Mulligan AM, Mulot C, Neuhausen SL, Nevanlinna H, Neven P, Nielsen SF, Noh DY, Nordestgaard BG, Norman A, Olopade OI, Olson JE, Olsson H, Olswold C, Orr N, Pankratz VS, Park SK, Park-Simon TW, Lloyd R, Perez JIA, Peterlongo P, Peto J, Phillips KA, Pinchev M, Plaseska-Karanfilska D, Prentice R, Presneau N, Prokofyeva D, Pugh E, Pylkäs K, Rack B, Radice P, Rahman N, Rennert G, Rennert HS, Rhenius V, Romero A, Romm J, Ruddy KJ, Rüdiger T, Rudolph A, Ruebner M, Rutgers EJT, Saloustros E, Sandler DP, Sangrajrang S, Sawyer EJ, Schmidt DF, Schmutzler RK, Schneeweiss A, Schoemaker MJ, Schumacher F, Schürmann P, Scott RJ, Scott C, Seal S, Seynaeve C, Shah M, Sharma P, Shen CY, Sheng G, Sherman ME, Shrubsole MJ, Shu XO, Smeets A, Sohn C, Southey MC, Spinelli JJ, Stegmaier C, Stewart-Brown S, Stone J, Stram DO, Surowy H, Swerdlow A, Tamimi R, Taylor JA, Tengström M, Teo SH, Beth Terry M, Tessier DC, Thanasitthichai S, Thöne K, Tollenaar RAEM, Tomlinson I, Tong L, Torres D, Truong T, Tseng CC, Tsugane S, Ulmer HU, Ursin G, Untch M, Vachon C, van Asperen CJ, Van Den Berg D, van den Ouweland AMW, van der Kolk L, van der Luijt RB, Vincent D, Vollenweider J, Waisfisz Q, Wang-Gohrke S, Weinberg CR, Wendt C, Whittemore AS, Wildiers H, Willett W, Winqvist R, Wolk A, Wu AH, Xia L, Yamaji T, Yang XR, Har Yip C, Yoo KY, Yu JC, Zheng W, Zheng Y, Zhu B, Ziogas A, Ziv E, ABCTB Investigators, ConFab/AOCS Investigators, Lakhani SR, Antoniou AC, Droit A, Andrulis IL, Amos CI, Couch FJ, Pharoah PDP, Chang-Claude J, Hall P, Hunter DJ, Milne RL, García-Closas M, Schmidt MK, Chanock SJ, Dunning AM, Edwards SL, Bader GD, Chenevix-Trench G, Simard J, Kraft P, Easton DF
(2017) Nature 551: 92-94
MeSH Terms: Asia, Asian Continental Ancestry Group, Binding Sites, Breast Neoplasms, Computer Simulation, Europe, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Genetic Loci, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genome-Wide Association Study, Humans, Multifactorial Inheritance, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Regulatory Sequences, Nucleic Acid, Risk Assessment, Transcription Factors
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2018
Breast cancer risk is influenced by rare coding variants in susceptibility genes, such as BRCA1, and many common, mostly non-coding variants. However, much of the genetic contribution to breast cancer risk remains unknown. Here we report the results of a genome-wide association study of breast cancer in 122,977 cases and 105,974 controls of European ancestry and 14,068 cases and 13,104 controls of East Asian ancestry. We identified 65 new loci that are associated with overall breast cancer risk at P < 5 × 10. The majority of credible risk single-nucleotide polymorphisms in these loci fall in distal regulatory elements, and by integrating in silico data to predict target genes in breast cells at each locus, we demonstrate a strong overlap between candidate target genes and somatic driver genes in breast tumours. We also find that heritability of breast cancer due to all single-nucleotide polymorphisms in regulatory features was 2-5-fold enriched relative to the genome-wide average, with strong enrichment for particular transcription factor binding sites. These results provide further insight into genetic susceptibility to breast cancer and will improve the use of genetic risk scores for individualized screening and prevention.
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17 MeSH Terms