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Histone deacetylase 3 controls a transcriptional network required for B cell maturation.
Stengel KR, Bhaskara S, Wang J, Liu Q, Ellis JD, Sampathi S, Hiebert SW
(2019) Nucleic Acids Res 47: 10612-10627
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antigens, CD19, B-Lymphocytes, Base Sequence, Cell Differentiation, Gene Expression Regulation, Gene Regulatory Networks, Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors, Histone Deacetylases, Lipopolysaccharides, Lymphocyte Activation, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Plasma Cells, Positive Regulatory Domain I-Binding Factor 1, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-6, Repressor Proteins, Transcription, Genetic, Up-Regulation
Show Abstract · Added October 25, 2019
Histone deacetylase 3 (Hdac3) is a target of the FDA approved HDAC inhibitors, which are used for the treatment of lymphoid malignancies. Here, we used Cd19-Cre to conditionally delete Hdac3 to define its role in germinal center B cells, which represent the cell of origin for many B cell malignancies. Cd19-Cre-Hdac3-/- mice showed impaired germinal center formation along with a defect in plasmablast production. Analysis of Hdac3-/- germinal centers revealed a reduction in dark zone centroblasts and accumulation of light zone centrocytes. RNA-seq revealed a significant correlation between genes up-regulated upon Hdac3 loss and those up-regulated in Foxo1-deleted germinal center B cells, even though Foxo1 typically activates transcription. Therefore, to determine whether gene expression changes observed in Hdac3-/- germinal centers were a result of direct effects of Hdac3 deacetylase activity, we used an HDAC3 selective inhibitor and examined nascent transcription in germinal center-derived cell lines. Transcriptional changes upon HDAC3 inhibition were enriched for light zone gene signatures as observed in germinal centers. Further comparison of PRO-seq data with ChIP-seq/exo data for BCL6, SMRT, FOXO1 and H3K27ac identified direct targets of HDAC3 function including CD86, CD83 and CXCR5 that are likely responsible for driving the light zone phenotype observed in vivo.
© The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.
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18 MeSH Terms
Genetic Mosaicism in Calmodulinopathy.
Wren LM, Jiménez-Jáimez J, Al-Ghamdi S, Al-Aama JY, Bdeir A, Al-Hassnan ZN, Kuan JL, Foo RY, Potet F, Johnson CN, Aziz MC, Carvill GL, Kaski JP, Crotti L, Perin F, Monserrat L, Burridge PW, Schwartz PJ, Chazin WJ, Bhuiyan ZA, George AL
(2019) Circ Genom Precis Med 12: 375-385
MeSH Terms: Arrhythmias, Cardiac, Base Sequence, Calcium, Calmodulin, Child, Preschool, Electrophysiology, Female, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Humans, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Male, Mosaicism, Mutation, Missense, Pedigree
Show Abstract · Added March 11, 2020
BACKGROUND - CaM (calmodulin) mutations are associated with congenital arrhythmia susceptibility (calmodulinopathy) and are most often de novo. In this report, we sought to broaden the genotype-phenotype spectrum of calmodulinopathies with 2 novel calmodulin mutations and to investigate mosaicism in 2 affected families.
METHODS - CaM mutations were identified in 4 independent cases by DNA sequencing. Biochemical and electrophysiological studies were performed to determine functional consequences of each mutation.
RESULTS - Genetic studies identified 2 novel CaM variants (-E141K in 2 cases; -E141V) and one previously reported CaM pathogenic variant (-D130G) among 4 probands with shared clinical features of prolonged QTc interval (range 505-725 ms) and documented ventricular arrhythmia. A fatal outcome occurred for 2 of the cases. The parents of all probands were asymptomatic with normal QTc duration. However, 2 of the families had multiple affected offspring or multiple occurrences of intrauterine fetal demise. The mother from the family with recurrent intrauterine fetal demise exhibited the -E141K mutant allele in 25% of next-generation sequencing reads indicating somatic mosaicism, whereas -D130G was present in 6% of captured molecules of the paternal DNA sample, also indicating mosaicism. Two novel mutations (E141K and E141V) impaired Ca binding affinity to the C-domain of CaM. Human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes overexpressing mutant or wild-type CaM showed that both mutants impaired Ca-dependent inactivation of L-type Ca channels and prolonged action potential duration.
CONCLUSIONS - We report 2 families with somatic mosaicism associated with arrhythmogenic calmodulinopathy, and demonstrate dysregulation of L-type Ca channels by 2 novel CaM mutations affecting the same residue. Parental mosaicism should be suspected in families with unexplained fetal arrhythmia or fetal demise combined with a documented CaM mutation.
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15 MeSH Terms
A Rapid Allele-Specific Assay for HLA-A*32:01 to Identify Patients at Risk for Vancomycin-Induced Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms.
Rwandamuriye FX, Chopra A, Konvinse KC, Choo L, Trubiano JA, Shaffer CM, Watson M, Mallal SA, Phillips EJ
(2019) J Mol Diagn 21: 782-789
MeSH Terms: Alleles, Anti-Bacterial Agents, Base Sequence, Drug Hypersensitivity Syndrome, Eosinophilia, Genetic Testing, HLA-A Antigens, Humans, Polymerase Chain Reaction, Sequence Homology, Vancomycin
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2020
Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles have been implicated as risk factors for immune-mediated adverse drug reactions. The authors recently reported a strong association between HLA-A*32:01 and vancomycin-induced drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms. Identification of individuals with the risk allele before or shortly after the initiation of vancomycin therapy is of great clinical importance to prevent morbidity and mortality, and improve drug safety and antibiotic treatment options. A prerequisite to the success of pharmacogenetic screening tests is the development of simple, robust, cost-effective single HLA allele test that can be implemented in routine diagnostic laboratories. In this study, the authors developed a simple, real-time allele-specific PCR for typing the HLA-A*32:01 allele. Four-hundred and fifty-eight DNA samples including 30 HLA-A*32:01-positive samples were typed by allele-specific PCR. Compared with American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics-accredited, sequence-based, high-resolution, full-allelic HLA typing, this assay demonstrates 100% accuracy, 100% sensitivity (95% CI, 88.43% to 100%), and 100% specificity (95% CI, 99.14% to 100%). The lowest limit of detection of this assay using PowerUp SYBR Green is 10 ng of template DNA. The assay demonstrates a sensitivity and specificity to differentiate the HLA-A*32:01 allele from closely related non-HLA-A*32 alleles and may be used in clinical settings to identify individuals with the risk allele before or during the course of vancomycin therapy.
Copyright © 2019 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Extensive loss of cell-cycle and DNA repair genes in an ancient lineage of bipolar budding yeasts.
Steenwyk JL, Opulente DA, Kominek J, Shen XX, Zhou X, Labella AL, Bradley NP, Eichman BF, Čadež N, Libkind D, DeVirgilio J, Hulfachor AB, Kurtzman CP, Hittinger CT, Rokas A
(2019) PLoS Biol 17: e3000255
MeSH Terms: Base Sequence, Cell Cycle, DNA Damage, DNA Repair, Evolution, Molecular, Genes, Fungal, Phenotype, Phylogeny, Saccharomycetales
Show Abstract · Added August 26, 2019
Cell-cycle checkpoints and DNA repair processes protect organisms from potentially lethal mutational damage. Compared to other budding yeasts in the subphylum Saccharomycotina, we noticed that a lineage in the genus Hanseniaspora exhibited very high evolutionary rates, low Guanine-Cytosine (GC) content, small genome sizes, and lower gene numbers. To better understand Hanseniaspora evolution, we analyzed 25 genomes, including 11 newly sequenced, representing 18/21 known species in the genus. Our phylogenomic analyses identify two Hanseniaspora lineages, a faster-evolving lineage (FEL), which began diversifying approximately 87 million years ago (mya), and a slower-evolving lineage (SEL), which began diversifying approximately 54 mya. Remarkably, both lineages lost genes associated with the cell cycle and genome integrity, but these losses were greater in the FEL. E.g., all species lost the cell-cycle regulator WHIskey 5 (WHI5), and the FEL lost components of the spindle checkpoint pathway (e.g., Mitotic Arrest-Deficient 1 [MAD1], Mitotic Arrest-Deficient 2 [MAD2]) and DNA-damage-checkpoint pathway (e.g., Mitosis Entry Checkpoint 3 [MEC3], RADiation sensitive 9 [RAD9]). Similarly, both lineages lost genes involved in DNA repair pathways, including the DNA glycosylase gene 3-MethylAdenine DNA Glycosylase 1 (MAG1), which is part of the base-excision repair pathway, and the DNA photolyase gene PHotoreactivation Repair deficient 1 (PHR1), which is involved in pyrimidine dimer repair. Strikingly, the FEL lost 33 additional genes, including polymerases (i.e., POLymerase 4 [POL4] and POL32) and telomere-associated genes (e.g., Repressor/activator site binding protein-Interacting Factor 1 [RIF1], Replication Factor A 3 [RFA3], Cell Division Cycle 13 [CDC13], Pbp1p Binding Protein [PBP2]). Echoing these losses, molecular evolutionary analyses reveal that, compared to the SEL, the FEL stem lineage underwent a burst of accelerated evolution, which resulted in greater mutational loads, homopolymer instabilities, and higher fractions of mutations associated with the common endogenously damaged base, 8-oxoguanine. We conclude that Hanseniaspora is an ancient lineage that has diversified and thrived, despite lacking many otherwise highly conserved cell-cycle and genome integrity genes and pathways, and may represent a novel, to our knowledge, system for studying cellular life without them.
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9 MeSH Terms
Regulation of the Pancreatic Exocrine Differentiation Program and Morphogenesis by Onecut 1/Hnf6.
Kropp PA, Zhu X, Gannon M
(2019) Cell Mol Gastroenterol Hepatol 7: 841-856
MeSH Terms: Acinar Cells, Animals, Animals, Newborn, Base Sequence, Cell Differentiation, Cell Proliferation, Embryo, Mammalian, Epithelium, Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental, Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 6, Mice, Morphogenesis, Pancreas, Exocrine
Show Abstract · Added March 29, 2019
BACKGROUND & AIMS - The Onecut 1 transcription factor (Oc1, a.k.a. HNF6) promotes differentiation of endocrine and duct cells of the pancreas; however, it has no known role in acinar cell differentiation. We sought to better understand the role of Oc1 in exocrine pancreas development and to identify its direct transcriptional targets.
METHODS - Pancreata from Oc1 (Oc1;Pdx1-Cre) mouse embryos and neonates were analyzed morphologically. High-throughput RNA-sequencing was performed on control and Oc1-deficient pancreas; chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing was performed on wild-type embryonic mouse pancreata to identify direct Oc1 transcriptional targets. Immunofluorescence labeling was used to confirm the RNA-sequencing /chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing results and to further investigate the effects of Oc1 loss on acinar cells.
RESULTS - Loss of Oc1 from the developing pancreatic epithelium resulted in disrupted duct and acinar cell development. RNA-sequencing revealed decreased expression of acinar cell regulatory factors (Nr5a2, Ptf1a, Gata4, Mist1) and functional genes (Amylase, Cpa1, Prss1, Spink1) at embryonic day (e) 18.5 in Oc1 samples. Approximately 1000 of the altered genes were also identified as direct Oc1 targets by chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing, including most of the previously noted genes. By immunolabeling, we confirmed that Amylase, Mist1, and GATA4 protein levels are significantly decreased by P2, and Spink1 protein levels were significantly reduced and mislocalized. The pancreatic duct regulatory factors Hnf1β and FoxA2 were also identified as direct Oc1 targets.
CONCLUSIONS - These findings confirm that Oc1 is an important regulator of both duct and acinar cell development in the embryonic pancreas. Novel transcriptional targets of Oc1 have now been identified and provide clarity into the mechanisms of Oc1 transcriptional regulation in the developing exocrine pancreas. Oc1 can now be included in the gene-regulatory network of acinar cell regulatory genes. Oc1 regulates other acinar cell regulatory factors and acinar cell functional genes directly, and it can also regulate some acinar cell regulatory factors (eg, Mist1) indirectly. Oc1 therefore plays an important role in acinar cell development.
Copyright © 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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13 MeSH Terms
High frequency of shared clonotypes in human B cell receptor repertoires.
Soto C, Bombardi RG, Branchizio A, Kose N, Matta P, Sevy AM, Sinkovits RS, Gilchuk P, Finn JA, Crowe JE
(2019) Nature 566: 398-402
MeSH Terms: Adult, Amino Acid Sequence, Antibodies, Antigens, B-Lymphocytes, Base Sequence, Clone Cells, Female, Fetal Blood, Healthy Volunteers, Humans, Infant, Newborn, Male, Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell, Sequence Analysis, DNA
Show Abstract · Added March 31, 2019
The human genome contains approximately 20 thousand protein-coding genes, but the size of the collection of antigen receptors of the adaptive immune system that is generated by the recombination of gene segments with non-templated junctional additions (on B cells) is unknown-although it is certainly orders of magnitude larger. It has not been established whether individuals possess unique (or private) repertoires or substantial components of shared (or public) repertoires. Here we sequence recombined and expressed B cell receptor genes in several individuals to determine the size of their B cell receptor repertoires, and the extent to which these are shared between individuals. Our experiments revealed that the circulating repertoire of each individual contained between 9 and 17 million B cell clonotypes. The three individuals that we studied shared many clonotypes, including between 1 and 6% of B cell heavy-chain clonotypes shared between two subjects (0.3% of clonotypes shared by all three) and 20 to 34% of λ or κ light chains shared between two subjects (16 or 22% of λ or κ light chains, respectively, were shared by all three). Some of the B cell clonotypes had thousands of clones, or somatic variants, within the clonotype lineage. Although some of these shared lineages might be driven by exposure to common antigens, previous exposure to foreign antigens was not the only force that shaped the shared repertoires, as we also identified shared clonotypes in umbilical cord blood samples and all adult repertoires. The unexpectedly high prevalence of shared clonotypes in B cell repertoires, and identification of the sequences of these shared clonotypes, should enable better understanding of the role of B cell immune repertoires in health and disease.
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Broadly Neutralizing Antibody Mediated Clearance of Human Hepatitis C Virus Infection.
Kinchen VJ, Zahid MN, Flyak AI, Soliman MG, Learn GH, Wang S, Davidson E, Doranz BJ, Ray SC, Cox AL, Crowe JE, Bjorkman PJ, Shaw GM, Bailey JR
(2018) Cell Host Microbe 24: 717-730.e5
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antibodies, Monoclonal, Antibodies, Neutralizing, Antibody Specificity, Base Sequence, Binding Sites, Cell Line, Cricetulus, Epitopes, Female, HEK293 Cells, HIV-1, Hepacivirus, Hepatitis C, Hepatitis C Antibodies, Humans, Immunologic Memory, Male, Models, Molecular, Mutagenesis, Site-Directed, Viral Envelope Proteins, Viral Load
Show Abstract · Added March 31, 2019
The role that broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) play in natural clearance of human hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Here, we investigate the mechanism by which bNAbs, isolated from two humans who spontaneously cleared HCV infection, contribute to HCV control. Using viral gene sequences amplified from longitudinal plasma of the two subjects, we found that these bNAbs, which target the front layer of the HCV envelope protein E2, neutralized most autologous HCV strains. Acquisition of resistance to bNAbs by some autologous strains was accompanied by progressive loss of E2 protein function, and temporally associated with HCV clearance. These data demonstrate that bNAbs can mediate clearance of human HCV infection by neutralizing infecting strains and driving escaped viruses to an unfit state. These immunopathologic events distinguish HCV from HIV-1 and suggest that development of an HCV vaccine may be achievable.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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22 MeSH Terms
Comprehensive Molecular Characterization of the Hippo Signaling Pathway in Cancer.
Wang Y, Xu X, Maglic D, Dill MT, Mojumdar K, Ng PK, Jeong KJ, Tsang YH, Moreno D, Bhavana VH, Peng X, Ge Z, Chen H, Li J, Chen Z, Zhang H, Han L, Du D, Creighton CJ, Mills GB, Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network, Camargo F, Liang H
(2018) Cell Rep 25: 1304-1317.e5
MeSH Terms: Base Sequence, Cell Line, Tumor, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Humans, MicroRNAs, Models, Biological, Mutation, Neoplasms, Prognosis, Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added October 30, 2019
Hippo signaling has been recognized as a key tumor suppressor pathway. Here, we perform a comprehensive molecular characterization of 19 Hippo core genes in 9,125 tumor samples across 33 cancer types using multidimensional "omic" data from The Cancer Genome Atlas. We identify somatic drivers among Hippo genes and the related microRNA (miRNA) regulators, and using functional genomic approaches, we experimentally characterize YAP and TAZ mutation effects and miR-590 and miR-200a regulation for TAZ. Hippo pathway activity is best characterized by a YAP/TAZ transcriptional target signature of 22 genes, which shows robust prognostic power across cancer types. Our elastic-net integrated modeling further reveals cancer-type-specific pathway regulators and associated cancer drivers. Our results highlight the importance of Hippo signaling in squamous cell cancers, characterized by frequent amplification of YAP/TAZ, high expression heterogeneity, and significant prognostic patterns. This study represents a systems-biology approach to characterizing key cancer signaling pathways in the post-genomic era.
Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Metformin reduces liver glucose production by inhibition of fructose-1-6-bisphosphatase.
Hunter RW, Hughey CC, Lantier L, Sundelin EI, Peggie M, Zeqiraj E, Sicheri F, Jessen N, Wasserman DH, Sakamoto K
(2018) Nat Med 24: 1395-1406
MeSH Terms: Adenosine Monophosphate, Aminoimidazole Carboxamide, Animals, Base Sequence, Chickens, Disease Models, Animal, Fructose-Bisphosphatase, Glucose, Glucose Intolerance, Homeostasis, Humans, Hypoglycemia, Liver, Metformin, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mutation, Obesity, Prodrugs, Ribonucleotides
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Metformin is a first-line drug for the treatment of individuals with type 2 diabetes, yet its precise mechanism of action remains unclear. Metformin exerts its antihyperglycemic action primarily through lowering hepatic glucose production (HGP). This suppression is thought to be mediated through inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory complex I, and thus elevation of 5'-adenosine monophosphate (AMP) levels and the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), though this proposition has been challenged given results in mice lacking hepatic AMPK. Here we report that the AMP-inhibited enzyme fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase-1 (FBP1), a rate-controlling enzyme in gluconeogenesis, functions as a major contributor to the therapeutic action of metformin. We identified a point mutation in FBP1 that renders it insensitive to AMP while sparing regulation by fructose-2,6-bisphosphate (F-2,6-P), and knock-in (KI) of this mutant in mice significantly reduces their response to metformin treatment. We observe this during a metformin tolerance test and in a metformin-euglycemic clamp that we have developed. The antihyperglycemic effect of metformin in high-fat diet-fed diabetic FBP1-KI mice was also significantly blunted compared to wild-type controls. Collectively, we show a new mechanism of action for metformin and provide further evidence that molecular targeting of FBP1 can have antihyperglycemic effects.
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Dominant protection from HLA-linked autoimmunity by antigen-specific regulatory T cells.
Ooi JD, Petersen J, Tan YH, Huynh M, Willett ZJ, Ramarathinam SH, Eggenhuizen PJ, Loh KL, Watson KA, Gan PY, Alikhan MA, Dudek NL, Handel A, Hudson BG, Fugger L, Power DA, Holt SG, Coates PT, Gregersen JW, Purcell AW, Holdsworth SR, La Gruta NL, Reid HH, Rossjohn J, Kitching AR
(2017) Nature 545: 243-247
MeSH Terms: Animals, Anti-Glomerular Basement Membrane Disease, Autoimmunity, Base Sequence, CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes, Collagen Type IV, Cytokines, Female, Forkhead Transcription Factors, HLA-DR Serological Subtypes, HLA-DR1 Antigen, Humans, Immunodominant Epitopes, Male, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, Models, Molecular, T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory
Show Abstract · Added June 2, 2017
Susceptibility and protection against human autoimmune diseases, including type I diabetes, multiple sclerosis, and Goodpasture disease, is associated with particular human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles. However, the mechanisms underpinning such HLA-mediated effects on self-tolerance remain unclear. Here we investigate the molecular mechanism of Goodpasture disease, an HLA-linked autoimmune renal disorder characterized by an immunodominant CD4 T-cell self-epitope derived from the α3 chain of type IV collagen (α3). While HLA-DR15 confers a markedly increased disease risk, the protective HLA-DR1 allele is dominantly protective in trans with HLA-DR15 (ref. 2). We show that autoreactive α3-specific T cells expand in patients with Goodpasture disease and, in α3-immunized HLA-DR15 transgenic mice, α3-specific T cells infiltrate the kidney and mice develop Goodpasture disease. HLA-DR15 and HLA-DR1 exhibit distinct peptide repertoires and binding preferences and present the α3 epitope in different binding registers. HLA-DR15-α3 tetramer T cells in HLA-DR15 transgenic mice exhibit a conventional T-cell phenotype (T) that secretes pro-inflammatory cytokines. In contrast, HLA-DR1-α3 tetramer T cells in HLA-DR1 and HLA-DR15/DR1 transgenic mice are predominantly CD4Foxp3 regulatory T cells (T cells) expressing tolerogenic cytokines. HLA-DR1-induced T cells confer resistance to disease in HLA-DR15/DR1 transgenic mice. HLA-DR15 and HLA-DR1 healthy human donors display altered α3-specific T-cell antigen receptor usage, HLA-DR15-α3 tetramer Foxp3 T and HLA-DR1-α3 tetramer Foxp3CD25CD127 T dominant phenotypes. Moreover, patients with Goodpasture disease display a clonally expanded α3-specific CD4 T-cell repertoire. Accordingly, we provide a mechanistic basis for the dominantly protective effect of HLA in autoimmune disease, whereby HLA polymorphism shapes the relative abundance of self-epitope specific T cells that leads to protection or causation of autoimmunity.
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18 MeSH Terms