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Sequence Characteristics Distinguish Transcribed Enhancers from Promoters and Predict Their Breadth of Activity.
Colbran LL, Chen L, Capra JA
(2019) Genetics 211: 1205-1217
MeSH Terms: Base Composition, Enhancer Elements, Genetic, Histone Code, Humans, Models, Genetic, Promoter Regions, Genetic, Support Vector Machine, Transcription Factors, Transcriptional Activation
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Enhancers and promoters both regulate gene expression by recruiting transcription factors (TFs); however, the degree to which enhancer promoter activity is due to differences in their sequences or to genomic context is the subject of ongoing debate. We examined this question by analyzing the sequences of thousands of transcribed enhancers and promoters from hundreds of cellular contexts previously identified by cap analysis of gene expression. Support vector machine classifiers trained on counts of all possible 6-bp-long sequences (6-mers) were able to accurately distinguish promoters from enhancers and distinguish their breadth of activity across tissues. Classifiers trained to predict enhancer activity also performed well when applied to promoter prediction tasks, but promoter-trained classifiers performed poorly on enhancers. This suggests that the learned sequence patterns predictive of enhancer activity generalize to promoters, but not vice versa. Our classifiers also indicate that there are functionally relevant differences in enhancer and promoter GC content beyond the influence of CpG islands. Furthermore, sequences characteristic of broad promoter or broad enhancer activity matched different TFs, with predicted ETS- and RFX-binding sites indicative of promoters, and AP-1 sites indicative of enhancers. Finally, we evaluated the ability of our models to distinguish enhancers and promoters defined by histone modifications. Separating these classes was substantially more difficult, and this difference may contribute to ongoing debates about the similarity of enhancers and promoters. In summary, our results suggest that high-confidence transcribed enhancers and promoters can largely be distinguished based on biologically relevant sequence properties.
Copyright © 2019 by the Genetics Society of America.
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MeSH Terms
A Genome-Scale Investigation of How Sequence, Function, and Tree-Based Gene Properties Influence Phylogenetic Inference.
Shen XX, Salichos L, Rokas A
(2016) Genome Biol Evol 8: 2565-80
MeSH Terms: Animals, Base Composition, Genome, Fungal, Mammals, Phylogeny, Sequence Alignment, Yeasts
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2017
Molecular phylogenetic inference is inherently dependent on choices in both methodology and data. Many insightful studies have shown how choices in methodology, such as the model of sequence evolution or optimality criterion used, can strongly influence inference. In contrast, much less is known about the impact of choices in the properties of the data, typically genes, on phylogenetic inference. We investigated the relationships between 52 gene properties (24 sequence-based, 19 function-based, and 9 tree-based) with each other and with three measures of phylogenetic signal in two assembled data sets of 2,832 yeast and 2,002 mammalian genes. We found that most gene properties, such as evolutionary rate (measured through the percent average of pairwise identity across taxa) and total tree length, were highly correlated with each other. Similarly, several gene properties, such as gene alignment length, Guanine-Cytosine content, and the proportion of tree distance on internal branches divided by relative composition variability (treeness/RCV), were strongly correlated with phylogenetic signal. Analysis of partial correlations between gene properties and phylogenetic signal in which gene evolutionary rate and alignment length were simultaneously controlled, showed similar patterns of correlations, albeit weaker in strength. Examination of the relative importance of each gene property on phylogenetic signal identified gene alignment length, alongside with number of parsimony-informative sites and variable sites, as the most important predictors. Interestingly, the subsets of gene properties that optimally predicted phylogenetic signal differed considerably across our three phylogenetic measures and two data sets; however, gene alignment length and RCV were consistently included as predictors of all three phylogenetic measures in both yeasts and mammals. These results suggest that a handful of sequence-based gene properties are reliable predictors of phylogenetic signal and could be useful in guiding the choice of phylogenetic markers.
© The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.
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7 MeSH Terms
Ongoing GC-biased evolution is widespread in the human genome and enriched near recombination hot spots.
Katzman S, Capra JA, Haussler D, Pollard KS
(2011) Genome Biol Evol 3: 614-26
MeSH Terms: Base Composition, Chromosomes, Human, Computational Biology, Evolution, Molecular, Gene Frequency, Genome, Human, Humans, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Recombination, Genetic, Statistics as Topic
Show Abstract · Added April 18, 2017
Fast evolving regions of many metazoan genomes show a bias toward substitutions that change weak (A,T) into strong (G,C) base pairs. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) do not share this pattern, suggesting that it results from biased fixation rather than biased mutation. Supporting this hypothesis, analyses of polymorphism in specific regions of the human genome have identified a positive correlation between weak to strong (W→S) SNPs and derived allele frequency (DAF), suggesting that SNPs become increasingly GC biased over time, especially in regions of high recombination. Using polymorphism data generated by the 1000 Genomes Project from 179 individuals from 4 human populations, we evaluated the extent and distribution of ongoing GC-biased evolution in the human genome. We quantified GC fixation bias by comparing the DAFs of W→S mutations and S→W mutations using a Mann-Whitney U test. Genome-wide, W→S SNPs have significantly higher DAFs than S→W SNPs. This pattern is widespread across the human genome but varies in magnitude along the chromosomes. We found extreme GC-biased evolution in neighborhoods of recombination hot spots, a significant correlation between GC bias and recombination rate, and an inverse correlation between GC bias and chromosome arm length. These findings demonstrate the presence of ongoing fixation bias favoring G and C alleles throughout the human genome and suggest that the bias is caused by a recombination-associated process, such as GC-biased gene conversion.
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10 MeSH Terms
Substitution patterns are GC-biased in divergent sequences across the metazoans.
Capra JA, Pollard KS
(2011) Genome Biol Evol 3: 516-27
MeSH Terms: Animals, Base Composition, Base Sequence, Bias, Dogs, Evolution, Molecular, Gene Conversion, Genome, Humans, Mice, Odds Ratio, Phylogeny, Species Specificity
Show Abstract · Added April 18, 2017
The fastest-evolving regions in the human and chimpanzee genomes show a remarkable excess of weak (A,T) to strong (G,C) nucleotide substitutions since divergence from their common ancestor. We investigated the phylogenetic extent and possible causes of this weak to strong (W → S) bias in divergent sequences (BDS) using recently sequenced genomes and recombination maps from eight trios of eukaryotic species. To quantify evidence for BDS, we inferred substitution histories using an efficient maximum likelihood approach with a context-dependent evolutionary model. We then annotated all lineage-specific substitutions in terms of W → S bias and density on the chromosomes. Finally, we used the inferred substitutions to calculate a BDS score-a log odds ratio between substitution type and density-and assessed its statistical significance with Fisher's exact test. Applying this approach, we found significant BDS in the coding and noncoding sequence of human, mouse, dog, stickleback, fruit fly, and worm. We also observed a significant lack of W → S BDS in chicken and yeast. The BDS score varies between species and across the chromosomes within each species. It is most strongly correlated with different genomic features in different species, but a strong correlation with recombination rates is found in several species. Our results demonstrate that a W → S substitution bias in fast-evolving sequences is a widespread phenomenon. The patterns of BDS observed suggest that a recombination-associated process, such as GC-biased gene conversion, is involved in the production of the bias in many species, but the strength of the BDS likely depends on many factors, including genome stability, variability in recombination rate over time and across the genome, the frequency of meiosis, and the amount of outcrossing in each species.
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13 MeSH Terms
Features of recent codon evolution: a comparative polymorphism-fixation study.
Zhao Z, Jiang C
(2010) J Biomed Biotechnol 2010: 202918
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Substitution, Animals, Base Composition, Codon, CpG Islands, Evolution, Molecular, Humans, Mice, Mutation, Pan troglodytes, Polymorphism, Genetic, Species Specificity
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
Features of amino-acid and codon changes can provide us important insights on protein evolution. So far, investigators have often examined mutation patterns at either interspecies fixed substitution or intraspecies nucleotide polymorphism level, but not both. Here, we performed a unique analysis of a combined set of intra-species polymorphisms and inter-species substitutions in human codons. Strong difference in mutational pattern was found at codon positions 1, 2, and 3 between the polymorphism and fixation data. Fixation had strong bias towards increasing the rarest codons but decreasing the most frequently used codons, suggesting that codon equilibrium has not been reached yet. We detected strong CpG effect on CG-containing codons and subsequent suppression by fixation. Finally, we detected the signature of purifying selection against Amid R:U dinucleotides at synonymous dicodon boundaries. Overall, fixation process could effectively and quickly correct the volatile changes introduced by polymorphisms so that codon changes could be gradual and directional and that codon composition could be kept relatively stable during evolution.
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12 MeSH Terms
Cloning of adipose triglyceride lipase complementary deoxyribonucleic acid in poultry and expression of adipose triglyceride lipase during development of adipose in chickens.
Lee K, Shin J, Latshaw JD, Suh Y, Serr J
(2009) Poult Sci 88: 620-30
MeSH Terms: Adipose Tissue, Amino Acid Sequence, Animals, Base Composition, Chickens, Cloning, Molecular, DNA, Complementary, Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental, Lipase, Molecular Sequence Data, Quail, Turkeys
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2014
Increasing the breakdown of stored fat in adipose tissue leads to reducing fat content, enhancing feed efficiency and, consequently, decreasing the production cost of poultry. The processes of lipolysis are not completely understood, and the proteins involved in this process need to be identified. An adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), recently identified in several species, has not been studied in avian species. We have cloned the full-length coding sequences of ATGL cDNA for the chicken, turkey, and quail. Sequence comparisons among mammals and these avian species showed that the avian ATGL have 2 conserved domains, the patatin domain and the hydrophobic domain. The patatin domain contains lipase activity, and the hydrophobic domain exhibits lipid droplet binding. The high levels of chicken, turkey, and quail ATGL mRNA and protein are exclusively found in subcutaneous and abdominal adipose tissues. In addition, chicken ATGL (gATGL) is mainly expressed in the fractionated adipocytes compared with stromal-vascular cells that mostly contain preadipocytes (P < 0.001). Furthermore, ontogeny of gATGL mRNA and protein expression in adipose tissue showed induction of gATGL immediately after hatching before access to food (P < 0.05), suggesting that an energy deficit due to posthatching starvation may increase breakdown of stored fat via increasing gATGL expression in adipose tissue. Our studies showed that expression of the chicken ATGL is adipose specific and regulated developmentally, suggesting that a possible modulation of ATGL expression would regulate fat deposition in avian species.
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12 MeSH Terms
Evidence for variable selective pressures at a large secondary structure of the human mitochondrial DNA control region.
Pereira F, Soares P, Carneiro J, Pereira L, Richards MB, Samuels DC, Amorim A
(2008) Mol Biol Evol 25: 2759-70
MeSH Terms: Animals, Base Composition, DNA, Mitochondrial, Gene Deletion, Humans, Locus Control Region, Mitochondria, Nucleic Acid Conformation, Primates, Selection, Genetic
Show Abstract · Added December 12, 2013
A combined effect of functional constraints and random mutational events is responsible for the sequence evolution of the human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region. Most studies targeting this noncoding segment usually focus on its primary sequence information disregarding other informative levels such as secondary or tertiary DNA conformations. In this work, we combined the most recent developments in DNA folding calculations with a phylogenetic comparative approach in order to investigate the formation of intrastrand secondary structures in the human mtDNA control region. Our most striking results are those regarding a new cloverleaf-like secondary structure predicted for a 93-bp stretch of the control region 5'-peripheral domain. Randomized sequences indicated that this structure has a more negative folding energy than the average of random sequences with the same nucleotide composition. In addition, a sliding window scan across the complete mitochondrial genome revealed that it stands out as having one of the highest folding potential. Moreover, we detected several lines of evidence of both negative and positive selection on this structure with high levels of conservation at the structure-relevant stem regions and the occurrence of compensatory base changes in the primate lineage. In the light of previous data, we discuss the possible involvement of this structure in mtDNA replication and/or transcription. We conclude that maintenance of this structure is responsible for the observed heterogeneity in the rate of substitution among sites in part of the human hypervariable region I and that it is a hot spot for the 3' end of human mtDNA deletions.
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10 MeSH Terms
CpG island density and its correlations with genomic features in mammalian genomes.
Han L, Su B, Li WH, Zhao Z
(2008) Genome Biol 9: R79
MeSH Terms: Animals, Base Composition, Cattle, Chromosomes, Mammalian, Computational Biology, CpG Islands, Dogs, Genome, Genome, Human, Humans, Mammals, Mice, Rats, Recombination, Genetic
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
BACKGROUND - CpG islands, which are clusters of CpG dinucleotides in GC-rich regions, are considered gene markers and represent an important feature of mammalian genomes. Previous studies of CpG islands have largely been on specific loci or within one genome. To date, there seems to be no comparative analysis of CpG islands and their density at the DNA sequence level among mammalian genomes and of their correlations with other genome features.
RESULTS - In this study, we performed a systematic analysis of CpG islands in ten mammalian genomes. We found that both the number of CpG islands and their density vary greatly among genomes, though many of these genomes encode similar numbers of genes. We observed significant correlations between CpG island density and genomic features such as number of chromosomes, chromosome size, and recombination rate. We also observed a trend of higher CpG island density in telomeric regions. Furthermore, we evaluated the performance of three computational algorithms for CpG island identifications. Finally, we compared our observations in mammals to other non-mammal vertebrates.
CONCLUSION - Our study revealed that CpG islands vary greatly among mammalian genomes. Some factors such as recombination rate and chromosome size might have influenced the evolution of CpG islands in the course of mammalian evolution. Our results suggest a scenario in which an increase in chromosome number increases the rate of recombination, which in turn elevates GC content to help prevent loss of CpG islands and maintain their density. These findings should be useful for studying mammalian genomes, the role of CpG islands in gene function, and molecular evolution.
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14 MeSH Terms
Directionality of point mutation and 5-methylcytosine deamination rates in the chimpanzee genome.
Jiang C, Zhao Z
(2006) BMC Genomics 7: 316
MeSH Terms: 5-Methylcytosine, Animals, Base Composition, CpG Islands, DNA Mutational Analysis, Databases, Nucleic Acid, Deamination, Evolution, Molecular, Exons, Genome, Genome, Human, Humans, Pan troglodytes, Point Mutation, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
BACKGROUND - The pattern of point mutation is important for studying mutational mechanisms, genome evolution, and diseases. Previous studies of mutation direction were largely based on substitution data from a limited number of loci. To date, there is no genome-wide analysis of mutation direction or methylation-dependent transition rates in the chimpanzee or its categorized genomic regions.
RESULTS - In this study, we performed a detailed examination of mutation direction in the chimpanzee genome and its categorized genomic regions using 588,918 SNPs whose ancestral alleles could be inferred by mapping them to human genome sequences. The C-->T (G-->A) changes occurred most frequently in the chimpanzee genome. Each type of transition occurred approximately four times more frequently than each type of transversion. Notably, the frequency of C-->T (G-->A) was the highest in exons among the genomic categories regardless of whether we calculated directly, normalized with the nucleotide content, or removed the SNPs involved in the CpG effect. Moreover, the directionality of the point mutation in exons and CpG islands were opposite relative to their corresponding intergenic regions, indicating that different forces govern the nucleotide changes. Our analysis suggests that the GC content is not in equilibrium in the chimpanzee genome. Further quantitative analysis revealed that the 5-methylcytosine deamination rates at CpG sites were highly dependent on the local GC content and the lengths of SNP flanking sequences and varied among categorized genomic regions.
CONCLUSION - We present the first mutational spectrum, estimated by three different approaches, in the chimpanzee genome. Our results provide detailed information on recent nucleotide changes and methylation-dependent transition rates in the chimpanzee genome after its split from the human. These results have important implications for understanding genome composition evolution, mechanisms of point mutation, and other genetic factors such as selection, biased codon usage, biased gene conversion, and recombination.
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15 MeSH Terms
Mutational spectrum in the recent human genome inferred by single nucleotide polymorphisms.
Jiang C, Zhao Z
(2006) Genomics 88: 527-34
MeSH Terms: Animals, Base Composition, Biometry, CpG Islands, DNA, Data Interpretation, Statistical, Databases, Nucleic Acid, Evolution, Molecular, Exons, Genome, Human, Genomics, Humans, Introns, Mutation, Pan troglodytes, Papio, Point Mutation, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Species Specificity
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
So far, there is no genome-wide estimation of the mutational spectrum in humans. In this study, we systematically examined the directionality of the point mutations and maintenance of GC content in the human genome using approximately 1.8 million high-quality human single nucleotide polymorphisms and their ancestral sequences in chimpanzees. The frequency of C-->T (G-->A) changes was the highest among all mutation types and the frequency of each type of transition was approximately fourfold that of each type of transversion. In intergenic regions, when the GC content increased, the frequency of changes from G or C increased. In exons, the frequency of G:C-->A:T was the highest among the genomic categories and contributed mainly by the frequent mutations at the CpG sites. In contrast, mutations at the CpG sites, or CpG-->TpG/CpA mutations, occurred less frequently in the CpG islands relative to intergenic regions with similar GC content. Our results suggest that the GC content is overall not in equilibrium in the human genome, with a trend toward shifting the human genome to be AT rich and shifting the GC content of a region to approach the genome average. Our results, which differ from previous estimates based on limited loci or on the rodent lineage, provide the first representative and reliable mutational spectrum in the recent human genome and categorized genomic regions.
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19 MeSH Terms