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Survivorship, Version 2.2018, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology.
Denlinger CS, Sanft T, Baker KS, Broderick G, Demark-Wahnefried W, Friedman DL, Goldman M, Hudson M, Khakpour N, King A, Koura D, Lally RM, Langbaum TS, McDonough AL, Melisko M, Montoya JG, Mooney K, Moslehi JJ, O'Connor T, Overholser L, Paskett ED, Peppercorn J, Pirl W, Rodriguez MA, Ruddy KJ, Silverman P, Smith S, Syrjala KL, Tevaarwerk A, Urba SG, Wakabayashi MT, Zee P, McMillian NR, Freedman-Cass DA
(2018) J Natl Compr Canc Netw 16: 1216-1247
MeSH Terms: Anthracyclines, Antibiotics, Antineoplastic, Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological, Bacterial Infections, Cancer Survivors, Cardiotoxicity, Humans, Immunocompromised Host, Lymphedema, Mass Screening, Medical Oncology, Neoplasms, Risk Assessment, Societies, Medical, Survivorship, United States, Vaccination, Virus Diseases
Show Abstract · Added December 13, 2018
The NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship provide screening, evaluation, and treatment recommendations for common physical and psychosocial consequences of cancer and cancer treatment to help healthcare professionals who work with survivors of adult-onset cancer in the posttreatment period. This portion of the guidelines describes recommendations regarding the management of anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity and lymphedema. In addition, recommendations regarding immunizations and the prevention of infections in cancer survivors are included.
Copyright © 2018 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.
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18 MeSH Terms
Dysbiotic Proteobacteria expansion: a microbial signature of epithelial dysfunction.
Litvak Y, Byndloss MX, Tsolis RM, Bäumler AJ
(2017) Curr Opin Microbiol 39: 1-6
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bacterial Infections, Colitis, Colon, Dysbiosis, Gastrointestinal Microbiome, Humans, Intestinal Mucosa, Mice, Proteobacteria
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2020
A balanced gut microbiota is important for health, but the mechanisms maintaining homeostasis are incompletely understood. Anaerobiosis of the healthy colon drives the composition of the gut microbiota towards a dominance of obligate anaerobes, while dysbiosis is often associated with a sustained increase in the abundance of facultative anaerobic Proteobacteria, indicative of a disruption in anaerobiosis. The colonic epithelium is hypoxic, but intestinal inflammation or antibiotic treatment increases epithelial oxygenation in the colon, thereby disrupting anaerobiosis to drive a dysbiotic expansion of facultative anaerobic Proteobacteria through aerobic respiration. These observations suggest a dysbiotic expansion of Proteobacteria is a potential diagnostic microbial signature of epithelial dysfunction, a hypothesis that could spawn novel preventative or therapeutic strategies for a broad spectrum of human diseases.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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Multisite external validation of a risk prediction model for the diagnosis of blood stream infections in febrile pediatric oncology patients without severe neutropenia.
Esbenshade AJ, Zhao Z, Aftandilian C, Saab R, Wattier RL, Beauchemin M, Miller TP, Wilkes JJ, Kelly MJ, Fernbach A, Jeng M, Schwartz CL, Dvorak CC, Shyr Y, Moons KGM, Sulis ML, Friedman DL
(2017) Cancer 123: 3781-3790
MeSH Terms: Bacteremia, Child, Child, Preschool, Datasets as Topic, Febrile Neutropenia, Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections, Humans, Immunocompromised Host, Models, Statistical, Neoplasms, Predictive Value of Tests, Retrospective Studies, Risk, Staphylococcal Infections, Staphylococcus aureus, Uncertainty
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2018
BACKGROUND - Pediatric oncology patients are at an increased risk of invasive bacterial infection due to immunosuppression. The risk of such infection in the absence of severe neutropenia (absolute neutrophil count ≥ 500/μL) is not well established and a validated prediction model for blood stream infection (BSI) risk offers clinical usefulness.
METHODS - A 6-site retrospective external validation was conducted using a previously published risk prediction model for BSI in febrile pediatric oncology patients without severe neutropenia: the Esbenshade/Vanderbilt (EsVan) model. A reduced model (EsVan2) excluding 2 less clinically reliable variables also was created using the initial EsVan model derivative cohort, and was validated using all 5 external validation cohorts. One data set was used only in sensitivity analyses due to missing some variables.
RESULTS - From the 5 primary data sets, there were a total of 1197 febrile episodes and 76 episodes of bacteremia. The overall C statistic for predicting bacteremia was 0.695, with a calibration slope of 0.50 for the original model and a calibration slope of 1.0 when recalibration was applied to the model. The model performed better in predicting high-risk bacteremia (gram-negative or Staphylococcus aureus infection) versus BSI alone, with a C statistic of 0.801 and a calibration slope of 0.65. The EsVan2 model outperformed the EsVan model across data sets with a C statistic of 0.733 for predicting BSI and a C statistic of 0.841 for high-risk BSI.
CONCLUSIONS - The results of this external validation demonstrated that the EsVan and EsVan2 models are able to predict BSI across multiple performance sites and, once validated and implemented prospectively, could assist in decision making in clinical practice. Cancer 2017;123:3781-3790. © 2017 American Cancer Society.
© 2017 American Cancer Society.
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Colonization resistance: The deconvolution of a complex trait.
Olsan EE, Byndloss MX, Faber F, Rivera-Chávez F, Tsolis RM, Bäumler AJ
(2017) J Biol Chem 292: 8577-8581
MeSH Terms: Animals, Anti-Bacterial Agents, Bacteria, Bacterial Infections, Drug Resistance, Bacterial, Gastrointestinal Microbiome, Humans, Intestines
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2020
Carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae are an emerging threat to hospitals worldwide, and antibiotic exposure is a risk factor for developing fecal carriage that may lead to nosocomial infection. Here, we review how antibiotics reduce colonization resistance against Enterobacteriaceae to pinpoint possible control points for curbing their spread. Recent work identifies host-derived respiratory electron acceptors as a critical resource driving a post-antibiotic expansion of Enterobacteriaceae within the large bowel. By providing a conceptual framework for colonization resistance against Enterobacteriaceae, these mechanistic insights point to the metabolism of epithelial cells as a possible target for intervention strategies.
© 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.
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How bacterial pathogens use type III and type IV secretion systems to facilitate their transmission.
Byndloss MX, Rivera-Chávez F, Tsolis RM, Bäumler AJ
(2017) Curr Opin Microbiol 35: 1-7
MeSH Terms: Animals, Brucella, Brucellosis, Gram-Negative Bacteria, Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections, Host-Pathogen Interactions, Humans, Protein Transport, Salmonella, Salmonella Infections, Type III Secretion Systems, Type IV Secretion Systems, Virulence Factors
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2020
Work on type III or type IV secretion systems (T3SSs or T4SSs) is often focused on elucidating how these sophisticated bacterial virulence factors manipulate host cell physiology to cause disease. But to fully understand their role in pathogen biology, it is important to consider whether the morbidity or mortality they trigger is somehow linked to enhancing communicability of the microbe. Recent work on Salmonella enterica and Brucella abortus provide captivating examples of how manipulation of host cells with T3SSs or T4SSs instigates distant downstream consequences that promote spread of the pathogen. It is clear from these examples that T3SSs and T4SSs are ultimately transmission factors placed under selection by an incredibly complex series of events unfolding during host pathogen interaction.
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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Transition Metals and Virulence in Bacteria.
Palmer LD, Skaar EP
(2016) Annu Rev Genet 50: 67-91
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bacteria, Bacterial Infections, Deficiency Diseases, Diet, Heme, Host-Pathogen Interactions, Humans, Iron, Iron Overload, Metals, Siderophores
Show Abstract · Added April 8, 2017
Transition metals are required trace elements for all forms of life. Due to their unique inorganic and redox properties, transition metals serve as cofactors for enzymes and other proteins. In bacterial pathogenesis, the vertebrate host represents a rich source of nutrient metals, and bacteria have evolved diverse metal acquisition strategies. Host metal homeostasis changes dramatically in response to bacterial infections, including production of metal sequestering proteins and the bombardment of bacteria with toxic levels of metals. In response, bacteria have evolved systems to subvert metal sequestration and toxicity. The coevolution of hosts and their bacterial pathogens in the battle for metals has uncovered emerging paradigms in social microbiology, rapid evolution, host specificity, and metal homeostasis across domains. This review focuses on recent advances and open questions in our understanding of the complex role of transition metals at the host-pathogen interface.
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EGFR regulates macrophage activation and function in bacterial infection.
Hardbower DM, Singh K, Asim M, Verriere TG, Olivares-Villagómez D, Barry DP, Allaman MM, Washington MK, Peek RM, Piazuelo MB, Wilson KT
(2016) J Clin Invest 126: 3296-312
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bacterial Infections, Chemokines, Citrobacter rodentium, Cytokines, Disease Progression, ErbB Receptors, Female, Gastric Mucosa, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Humans, Inflammation, Macrophage Activation, Macrophages, Male, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, NF-kappa B, Phosphorylation, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added August 3, 2016
EGFR signaling regulates macrophage function, but its role in bacterial infection has not been investigated. Here, we assessed the role of macrophage EGFR signaling during infection with Helicobacter pylori, a bacterial pathogen that causes persistent inflammation and gastric cancer. EGFR was phosphorylated in murine and human macrophages during H. pylori infection. In human gastric tissues, elevated levels of phosphorylated EGFR were observed throughout the histologic cascade from gastritis to carcinoma. Deleting Egfr in myeloid cells attenuated gastritis and increased H. pylori burden in infected mice. EGFR deficiency also led to a global defect in macrophage activation that was associated with decreased cytokine, chemokine, and NO production. We observed similar alterations in macrophage activation and disease phenotype in the Citrobacter rodentium model of murine infectious colitis. Mechanistically, EGFR signaling activated NF-κB and MAPK1/3 pathways to induce cytokine production and macrophage activation. Although deletion of Egfr had no effect on DC function, EGFR-deficient macrophages displayed impaired Th1 and Th17 adaptive immune responses to H. pylori, which contributed to decreased chronic inflammation in infected mice. Together, these results indicate that EGFR signaling is central to macrophage function in response to enteric bacterial pathogens and is a potential therapeutic target for infection-induced inflammation and associated carcinogenesis.
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21 MeSH Terms
Chronic Bacterial Pathogens: Mechanisms of Persistence.
Byndloss MX, Tsolis RM
(2016) Microbiol Spectr 4:
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antibodies, Bacterial, Bacteria, Bacterial Infections, Chronic Disease, Cytokines, Host-Parasite Interactions, Humans, Immune Evasion, Immune System, Immunity, Innate, Macrophages
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2020
Many bacterial pathogens can cause acute infections that are cleared with the onset of adaptive immunity, but a subset of these pathogens can establish persistent, and sometimes lifelong, infections. While bacteria that cause chronic infections are phylogenetically diverse, they share common features in their interactions with the host that enable a protracted period of colonization. This article will compare the persistence strategies of two chronic pathogens from the Proteobacteria, Brucella abortus and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, to consider how these two pathogens, which are very different at the genomic level, can utilize common strategies to evade immune clearance to cause chronic intracellular infections of the mononuclear phagocyte system.
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Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Extended Infusion Versus Short Infusion Piperacillin-Tazobactam in Critically Ill Patients Undergoing CRRT.
Shotwell MS, Nesbitt R, Madonia PN, Gould ER, Connor MJ, Salem C, Aduroja OA, Amde M, Groszek JJ, Wei P, Taylor ME, Tolwani AJ, Fissell WH
(2016) Clin J Am Soc Nephrol 11: 1377-83
MeSH Terms: Acute Kidney Injury, Adult, Aged, Anti-Bacterial Agents, Bacterial Infections, Critical Illness, Dialysis Solutions, Female, Hemodiafiltration, Humans, Infusions, Intravenous, Male, Middle Aged, Penicillanic Acid, Piperacillin, Piperacillin, Tazobactam Drug Combination, Time Factors
Show Abstract · Added June 2, 2016
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES - Infection is the most common cause of death in severe AKI, but many patients receiving continuous RRT do not reach target antibiotic concentrations in plasma. Extended infusion of β-lactams is associated with improved target attainment in critically ill patients; thus, we hypothesized that extended infusion piperacillin-tazobactam would improve piperacillin target attainment compared with short infusion in patients receiving continuous RRT.
DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS - We conducted an institutional review board-approved observational cohort study of piperacillin-tazobactam pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in critically ill patients receiving continuous venovenous hemodialysis and hemodiafiltration at three tertiary care hospitals between 2007 and 2015. Antibiotic concentrations in blood and/or dialysate samples were measured by liquid chromatography, and one- and two-compartment pharmacokinetic models were fitted to the data using nonlinear mixed effects regression. Target attainment for piperacillin was defined as achieving four times the minimum inhibitory concentration of 16 μg/ml for >50% of the dosing cycle. The probabilities of target attainment for a range of doses, frequencies, and infusion durations were estimated using a Monte Carlo simulation method. Target attainment was also examined as a function of patient weight and continuous RRT effluent rate.
RESULTS - Sixty-eight participants had data for analysis. Regardless of infusion duration, 6 g/d piperacillin was associated with ≤45% target attainment, whereas 12 g/d was associated with ≥95% target attainment. For 8 and 9 g/d, target attainment ranged between 68% and 85%. The probability of target attainment was lower at higher effluent rates and patient weights. For all doses, frequencies, patient weights, and continuous RRT effluent rates, extended infusion was associated with higher probability of target attainment compared with short infusion.
CONCLUSIONS - Extended infusions of piperacillin-tazobactam are associated with greater probability of target attainment in patients receiving continuous RRT.
Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.
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17 MeSH Terms
Dual role of arginine metabolism in establishing pathogenesis.
Gogoi M, Datey A, Wilson KT, Chakravortty D
(2016) Curr Opin Microbiol 29: 43-8
MeSH Terms: Animals, Arginase, Arginine, Bacteria, Bacterial Infections, Energy Metabolism, Host-Pathogen Interactions, Humans, Immune Evasion, Mice, Nitric Oxide, Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II
Show Abstract · Added February 15, 2016
Arginine is an integral part of host defense when invading pathogens are encountered. The arginine metabolite nitric oxide (NO) confers antimicrobial properties, whereas the metabolite ornithine is utilized for polyamine synthesis. Polyamines are crucial to tissue repair and anti-inflammatory responses. iNOS/arginase balance can determine Th1/Th2 response. Furthermore, the host arginine pool and its metabolites are utilized as energy sources by various pathogens. Apart from its role as an immune modulator, recent studies have also highlighted the therapeutic effects of arginine. This article sheds light upon the roles of arginine metabolism during pathological conditions and its therapeutic potential.
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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12 MeSH Terms